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Question On Ig A Deficiency

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Some questions on IgA deficiency!

Would an Ig A deficiency cause me to not react on an allergy panel, or to have a delayed reaction to the testing?

If I am Ig A deficient would I even feel those allergic reactions to pollens and stuff (mostly stuffy nose and itchy

face)?

I know that Ig A deficiency does affect the outcome of the celiac panel, so is there another blood panel that can be done for people who are Ig A deficient?

How do I know if I am Ig A deficient for sure?

Thanks!

Haley

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This is a great question. I wish I knew the answer. I finally convinced my mother to get a blood test for gluten intolerance which came back normal. I was shocked as my daughter and I both have it and based on my mom's history of health problems I am 99.9% sure that she has it as well. I plan to do more research on this topic. I wonder if the entrolab testing might be the better route in a case like this.

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Some questions on IgA deficiency!

Would an Ig A deficiency cause me to not react on an allergy panel, or to have a delayed reaction to the testing?

If I am Ig A deficient would I even feel those allergic reactions to pollens and stuff (mostly stuffy nose and itchy

face)?

I know that Ig A deficiency does affect the outcome of the celiac panel, so is there another blood panel that can be done for people who are Ig A deficient?

How do I know if I am Ig A deficient for sure?

Thanks!

Haley

From my understanding, the allergy panels mainly test IgE reactions, so the IgA deficiency should not make a significant difference on the allegy testing or the response time. The immunoglobulins A and E work on different things, that's why the "E" isn't even measured for the celiac panel, only "A" and "G", whereas the "E" is the main one for allergies. I think some allergy testing can include "G" testing, but I don't think I've ever heard of IgA being related to allergy testing. Someone can correct me if I'm wrong though.

You can get your "Total IgA" tested with bloodwork. They're supposed to do it when they run a celiac panel, but I've found out lots, if not most, doctors do not request it, WHICH THEY SHOULD! If you are IgA deficient, the body ramps up your IgG, so the IgG celiac testing would be the main indicators for celiac.

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From my understanding, the allergy panels mainly test IgE reactions, so the IgA deficiency should not make a significant difference on the allegy testing or the response time. The immunoglobulins A and E work on different things, that's why the "E" isn't even measured for the celiac panel, only "A" and "G", whereas the "E" is the main one for allergies. I think some allergy testing can include "G" testing, but I don't think I've ever heard of IgA being related to allergy testing. Someone can correct me if I'm wrong though.

You can get your "Total IgA" tested with bloodwork. They're supposed to do it when they run a celiac panel, but I've found out lots, if not most, doctors do not request it, WHICH THEY SHOULD! If you are IgA deficient, the body ramps up your IgG, so the IgG celiac testing would be the main indicators for celiac.

The standard serology antibody tests only test for IgA. You could try a DNA test. It can make one of two conclusions for you:

1) Either you do not, and cannot have celiac disease

2) You are predisposed, genetically, to having celiac disease.

From there, you could proceed forward with other diagnostic procedures, or you could decide that based on your symptoms and a #2 result of the DNA test, that you have it, and be done with the "wondering and worrying", and just start eating right.

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Some questions on IgA deficiency!

Would an Ig A deficiency cause me to not react on an allergy panel, or to have a delayed reaction to the testing?

If I am Ig A deficient would I even feel those allergic reactions to pollens and stuff (mostly stuffy nose and itchy

face)?

I know that Ig A deficiency does affect the outcome of the celiac panel, so is there another blood panel that can be done for people who are Ig A deficient?

How do I know if I am Ig A deficient for sure?

Thanks!

Haley

Haley,

I refer you to the following study:

"Celiac Disease and Immunoglobulin A Deficiency: How Effective Are the Serological Methods of Diagnosis?" V.Kumar et al.

Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology, November 2002, p. 1295-1300, Vol. 9, No. 6 DOI: 10.1128/CDLI.9.6.1295-1300.2002

One link to it: http://cvi.asm.org/cgi/content/full/9/6/1295

You may need other ways of accessing the journal article, like your local library. I can not attach it here because it is copyright by the journal....

However, this article will give you some more information and some more places to investigate for information about your case.

I can include the abstract however:

"Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency is 10 to 15 times more common in patients with celiac disease (celiac disease) than in healthy subjects. Serological tests have become the preferred methods of diagnosing celiac disease in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. However, commercially available serological methods are limited in that they detect only the IgA isotype of antibodies (with the exception of IgG gliadin assays); hence, IgA-deficient patients with celiac disease may yield false-negative serology. Fifteen pediatric patients with celiac disease and 10 IgA-deficient pediatric

patients without celiac disease were examined for IgA and IgG antibodies to endomysium, gliadin, and tissue transglu-taminase. Twenty-five specimens from patients with IgA deficiency were examined. Fifteen were from patients with celiac disease, and 10 were patients without celiac disease. All 15 IgA-deficient patients with celiac disease were positive for endomysium antibodies of the IgG isotype and for IgG gliadin antibodies. All but one of the IgA-deficient patients with celiac disease were also positive for IgG tissue transglutaminase antibodies. None of the IgA-deficient patients without celiac disease were positive for any of the antibody markers. All the specimens examined were also negative for IgA-specific antibodies to endomysium, gliadin, and tissue transglutaminase. IgG-specific antibody tests for endomysium, gliadin, and tissue transglutaminase are useful for the identification of IgA-deficient patients with celiac disease. IgG antibody tests along with tests routinely being used in clinical laboratories can reliably detect all active patients with celiac disease. In

addition, the levels of these celiac disease-specific IgG antibodies could be used to monitor patient dietary compliance."

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1. Would an Ig A deficiency cause me to not react on an allergy panel, or to have a delayed reaction to the testing?

No, allergy panels are based off of IgE antibodies. IgA bodies are mainly found in the gut, saliva, tears, and milk.

2. If I am Ig A deficient would I even feel those allergic reactions to pollens and stuff (mostly stuffy nose and itchy

face)?

IgA deficiency would not impact allergies.

3. I know that Ig A deficiency does affect the outcome of the celiac panel, so is there another blood panel that can be done for people who are Ig A deficient?

The most specific serological test for celiac is tTG IgA because IgA is found in the gut, and that is the location of the autoimmune reaction. You can have tTG IgG tested if you are IgA deficient.

How do I know if I am Ig A deficient for sure?

Get a total IgA count.

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Also, it is important to actually get the results of the total IgA. Even if it is within range but right at the bottom inside the range, it might cause the tests to show up positive. This is because the amount of IgA is important here. There have been some people posting about that on the forums, mainly regarding children who do not make a lot of IgA at least during their first three years.

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