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Don in Dallas

Psychological Impact Of Celiac

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Good Day!! I am in my 4th week of Gluten Free and things are finally beginning to improve. Still have the D and nausea but not as bad as in the beginning. I assume the tummy will get back to normal in time. What I wrestled with initially that I am beginning to give less energy to now, was the fact that bread, pasteries, pizza, etc. were off limits. I loved them all (and my weight 265 lbs showed it). Now, since the 1st of the year (before diagnosis) I have lost 25 lbs. and wearing clothes I haven't worn in years. Now that really makes me feel good.

I also think I am lactose intollerent as well. Had a bowl of gluten free cereal last week and was in the bathroom for hours. I have been reading the forums and find this is not unusual at all. There is a huge learning curve with this illness that I never thought about in the beginning. I do think however, that a gluten free life style, is going to have many more positives than negatives, now that I have gotten past the initial shock of the change in food habits.

I want to thank all of you who participate in this forum. It has been a life saver to read stories from others who have "been there, done that". It is making the journey much easier. I hope in time I can help each of you in someway as well......

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Don, that is a very kind thing to say. I, too, wish I had more time to post recipes, etc., and I will when I'm finished with my master's. It's always healthy to give back. I find it keeps me on the right track :) Until then, take care of you and keep up the good work. I know you will since you're already seeing the benefits.


Proofreader, copy editor, herb gardener and an evolving gluten-free cook.

Had a reaction to wheat, oats, rye, and barley in a lab test done by a homeopathic doctor in 1997. Have been mostly gluten-free since then. Also highly allergic to MSG.

Here's a quote I ran across when researching self-advocacy for children with special needs that I like: "Our subconscious picks up on each positive action we take on our own behalf, lifting the spirit and deepening our self-respect." Kat James

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Welcome and good job on the weight loss!

I'm on week 6 now of the diet and just starting to feel more "normal." I still have digestive issues but not so bad.

I'm on a pretty simple diet. Most of us find in the beiginning we need to cut diary, soy, some people cut nightshades like tomatoes and potatoes and bell peppers. I also don't eat any gluten free substitutes right now because I can't digest them either. Xanthan gum and tapioca starch are not agreeing with me at the moment.

Most people seem to be able to add back in many if not all the foods they had to cut, even if it's in moderation. It will just depend on how you heal I guess.

Arrowhead Mills has a gluten free baking mix with no tapioca or xanthan gum that I make pancakes and a bread that has the texture of cornbread out of. You do need to make sure you're getting enough carbs to have that energy sustained all day long.

Good luck and keep coming back for support. I can't live without this board right now.


Lots of doctors diagnosed me with lots of things including IBS, lactose intolerance, wheat intolerance, and quite a few of them threw up their hands in total confusion.

Had GI symptoms, allergy symptoms and unexplained illness my whole life.

Jan. 2010 Diagnosed celiac at the age of 40.

Ready to get well and get on with my life!

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Good Day!! I am in my 4th week of Gluten Free and things are finally beginning to improve. Still have the D and nausea but not as bad as in the beginning. I assume the tummy will get back to normal in time. What I wrestled with initially that I am beginning to give less energy to now, was the fact that bread, pasteries, pizza, etc. were off limits. I loved them all (and my weight 265 lbs showed it). Now, since the 1st of the year (before diagnosis) I have lost 25 lbs. and wearing clothes I haven't worn in years. Now that really makes me feel good.

I also think I am lactose intollerent as well. Had a bowl of gluten free cereal last week and was in the bathroom for hours. I have been reading the forums and find this is not unusual at all. There is a huge learning curve with this illness that I never thought about in the beginning. I do think however, that a gluten free life style, is going to have many more positives than negatives, now that I have gotten past the initial shock of the change in food habits.

I want to thank all of you who participate in this forum. It has been a life saver to read stories from others who have "been there, done that". It is making the journey much easier. I hope in time I can help each of you in someway as well......

What a great attitude. As they say, "Attitude is everything." It is going to be great to have you as part of the forum. Welcome.


Gluten Intolerant with double HLA-DQ6. Pre-diagnosis: Weight gain, swelling, diarrhea, mouth sores, back pain, body aches, fatigue, muscle weakness, BRAIN FOG, runny nose, recurrent sinus infections, bruising, low white cell count (whole life), and more. My feet were so bad, I could hardly walk. Toward the end: Chronic Vit. D deficiency (almost no D in my body despite a quality multi-vit. each day).

There is hope! Gluten-free since Sept. '09, and I have my life back - I feel better than in many, many years!

Favorite quotation: "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt

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For me in the beginning I had to take it one day at a time. I could not let myself think "I can never eat bread again." Instead it was "I'm not having bread today." He he, there are still sometimes days like that four years later. It's a coping mechanism. Get through today and worry about tomorrow tomorrow. Don't beat yourself over the head with "I can never".


"My mother always told me, it's okay to play with a man's mind

as long as you put it back where you got it when you're done with it."

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