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Ladyrhedd

Can gluten-free Pizza Be Trusted?

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Isn't there a high CC risk with gluten-free pizza from a pizza place? Our family favorite pizza place offers gluten-free pizza, but I'm nervous about even trying it. Part of me thinks I probably don't even need to worry about CC, but then again, I never realized I had damage to my small intestines until it was found, so why chance doing more damage? Anyway, I guess I'm just wondering how it can *really* be truly gluten free.

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Some establishments take appropriate precautions with respect to contamination; others do not. It is not possible to make a general statement. What place, specifically, are you wondering about.

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I think you have to talk to the manager about thier practices. We have a pizza place here that went thru training to be certified for gluten-free pizza. They get the crust from a gluten-free bakery. They have special pans and cutters. They use toppings like cheese & sauce from the fridge. The toppings get contaiminated from floury fingers and putting the sauce spoon on the dough. They even bake the pizza a distance from the other pizzas (15 inches, I think)

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It's a local place, not a chain. I will call and ask. What about places like Outback Steakhouse? Do they follow some protocols? Is that gov't mandated to claim it's gluten-free?

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There's a chain in Australia (Crust) that offer a gluten free pizza and I've never had problems with them. I think they partnered with the NSW Coeliac Society.

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What about places like Outback Steakhouse? Do they follow some protocols? Is that gov't mandated to claim it's gluten-free?

Outback have specific processes in place for gluten-free orders, as do many other establishments.

In the US, the term "gluten-free" remains unregulated, despite the requirement in federal law (FALCPA) that a rule be in place by 2008. It is still just a proposed rule. There was a case where someone was prosecuted for selling "gluten-free" bread that wasn't, but it was handled as criminal fraud and he went to prison.

In Canada, the term is regulated, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has taken enforcement action where the claim was made, but the handling procedures did not back up the claim.

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We go to a local place about once a month. They have a seperate oven, utensils, and toppings. So far so good. But...every single time, I quiz them to make sure nothing has changed. My kids get embarrassed that I ask the same person the same thing but I don't care. The waitress did tell me that they had a lady call back and complain that she was sick but they watched her cut her child's pizza and then cut hers! So remember.....don't touch anyone else's pizza. : )

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When I was a kid, I made pizza's at a local place.

Based on what I saw there, I would be hard-pressed to make it a safe environment for myself if I was once again behind the counter.

A pizza oven is FULL of old pieces of pizza crust. The counters are full of flour. The utensils, rags, pans and pizza board cannot be "protected" to remain uncontaminated IMHO.

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CeliacAndCfsCrusader, if you worked there as a kid, surely you understand that in those days there was no attempt to provide a gluten-free product.

Some pizza establishments have put processes in place to have separate preparation areas, color-coded pans, slicers and other utensils, and so forth. The floor of the oven may well have gluten-containing crumbs. The pizza (whether gluten-free or not) does not come into contact with that part of the oven. Gluten-free pizzas are (in typical places) baked only on the top rack, in pans which do not allow the pizza to contact the rack, and which (pans) are used only for gluten-free pizzas. The gluten-free crusts are made elsewhere and shipped to the pizzeria frozen or refrigerated.

Here in Ontario, the first chain to offer gluten-free pizza was Pizza Pizza. They worked closely with the Canadian Celiac Association to develop their handling procedures, and the CCA approves of them. I have eaten them on many occasions and have never had a problem. The first time, I walked into the local one and watched while they made it. Since then, I call ahead for pickup.

Contrast this with the joke of "gluten-free" pizza at Domino's--what a crock that is.

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Sorry, I missed your response. Maybe things are different here in the US, but I'll stand by experience.

IMHO, pizza places are full of kids behind the scenes, no matter how much training, there will be tons of "fooling around" in back. Flour fights, wiping utensils on the same aprons, cleaning pans 1/2 way because there is a big game on tv and it's busy.....it's just too much of a risk for me personally.

I guess it all depends on what your tolerance is.

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So there really can't be any information trusted? What I understand is that even if a restaurant says that they are gluten free, its always better to take the necessary precautions anyway? This is a practice that I can see as the best way to go about eating right. What I don't understand is what legally allows these establishments to claim a gluten conscious environment when they cannot necessarily control what goes on behind the scenes. Are there any people to regulate this? Monthly inspections? Company policies to protect the customers?

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You have to learn which establishments you trust and apply common sense.

I "might" trust a pizza joint....if I hadn't worked in one.

Just my two cents.

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You have to learn which establishments you trust and apply common sense.

I "might" trust a pizza joint....if I hadn't worked in one.

Just my two cents.

You've made your point.

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