Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    Is the Global Gluten-free Pet Food Market Set to Explode?

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Is gluten-free pet food the next great investment?


    Could gluten-free pet food be the next big thing? Photo: CC--Franchise Opportunities.
    Caption: Could gluten-free pet food be the next big thing? Photo: CC--Franchise Opportunities.

    Celiac.com 08/04/2017 - Industry analysts are projecting the global market for gluten-free pet foods to enjoy growth of up to 25% a year over the next decade. Across numerous industries, a shift from products containing gluten to gluten-free products is creating major potential for manufacturers.

    The latest market report from Persistence Market Researchers, titled Global Gluten-free Pet Food Market: Drivers and Restraints, projects double-digit growth in gluten-free pet food markets through 2025.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    The report offers market information and analysis on all segments of the global gluten-free pet food market broken down by type, flavor, specification, form, and distribution channel. Types include natural and added additives, while flavor types are further divided into chicken, beef, fish, and other red meat and white meats.

    Specification covers the type of pet, such as food for cats, for dogs, for birds, for pocket animals, and others. The report breaks down each of these categories.

    In terms of distribution channel, the global gluten-free pet food market report includes information on e-commerce, supermarkets, retail shops, exclusive pet shops, and others. Form type includes information on dry and wet pet food market segments.

    Gluten-free pet food is a new segment in the pet food industry, and has strong potential to displace regular pet foods.

    North America currently leads the world in gluten-free pet food production. Currently, there are no gluten-free pet food manufacturers in Europe.

    Meanwhile, North America and Europe are currently the largest consumers of gluten-free pet food products followed by Asia Pacific.

    A Sample of this Report is Available Upon Request at: PersistenceMarketResearch.com

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    02/01/2011 - Imagine having a dog that was specially-trained to sniff out even the tiniest amounts of gluten in food and warn you ahead of time. There are scores of people with celiac disease severe enough that the slightest trace of gluten can make them painfully ill. Hollie Scott is one of them. Scott is a University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine student is also lucky to have her dog Elias is a champion Beauceron and a gluten-detecter extraordinaire. The handsome Beauceron comes from a 400-year-old breed that became almost extinct serving as messenger dogs in Europe during two world wars. Even though he is just only 2 years old, Elias is...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/04/2016 - First, the good news. Canary seed, commonly used as feed for its namesake yellow birds has been approved as gluten-free and fit for human consumption in Canada.
    Health Canada and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration deemed canary bird seed as a health food suitable for those who need to adhere to a gluten-free diet. Canary seed is similar in size to flax or sesame seeds, is high in protein, and has a nutty flavor with a pleasant aroma.
    Canary seed can be added whole into energy bars and snack bars, sprinkled on yogurt or cereal. It can be used to top buns, bagels and breads. It can be ground into flour and use to make delicious...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/04/2016 - With all the hype about gluten-free diets going around, it's only natural that dog owners might wonder about potential benefits of a gluten-fee diet for their pet. Before rushing out and spending money on a bunch of new gluten-free grub for Fido, it's wise to first ask a few questions.
    First, figure out whether the dog is sensitive to gluten from wheat, barley, oats or rye, or if the dog is sensitive to grains including soy and corn. It's also possible that the dog has no sensitivities to the current food.
    Most dogs do not suffer from celiac disease, so a gluten-free diet is not necessary, nor will it be likely to improve...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/12/2017 - Humans rely on powerful canine noses to do so many things, including sniffing for drugs, bombs and even cancer.
    Now, some dogs are being trained to serve their masters by sniffing out gluten.
    Trained to help some of the 3 million Americans who have celiac disease, gluten sniffing dogs can be a tremendous boon to their owners, especially those who are highly sensitive.
    One such person is Evelyn Lapadat, a 13-year-old Indiana girl with celiac disease that leaves her with joint pain, stiffness and fatigue when she eats even tiny amounts of gluten.
    Now, thanks to Zeus, her Australian shepherd, Evelyn rarely has an issue...