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    Michelin-Starred French Chef Shoots for the Gluten-Free Moon


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 04/08/2016 - An all gluten-free menu by a celebrated French chef? At half price? Oui! Michelin-starred French chef is going all-in on gluten-free food by banishing gluten from her entire menu, and cutting prices in half to start it all off.


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    Photo: CC--Dennis33053The announcement, by Chef Reine Sammut, makes L'Auberge de la Feniere in Provence the first restaurant in France to have both a Michelin star and a gluten-free menu.

    The classic restaurant built in a stone barn and surrounded by vineyards has indeed adopted a gluten-free menu, says Sammut, who has had her Michelin star since 1995.

    She was inspired to make the change by her daughter, Nadia, who is a chemist and suffers from celiac disease. Sammut was eager to make the change to a gluten-free menu so that "everyone could eat at the same table."

    "The basic ingredients needed are not easy to find, but Nadia tracked them down," said Sammut. "I only had to test them."

    L'Auberge de la Feniere is offering its gluten-free menu, which even has gluten-free puff pastry, at half the usual price to encourage people to try the restaurant's new, gluten-free cuisine. She had me at "gluten-free puff pastry."

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    Guest Erica

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    Excellent news-time to visit France & going to this restaurant makes the must-do list. Thank you!

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    She had me at gluten free puff pastry as well!!! Wish I lived in France. Merci!

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    "Sammut was eager to make the change to a gluten-free menu so that "everyone could eat at the same table."

     

    What a novel idea, and hopefully more will follow her lead.

     

    Eating fresh, whole food meals is not difficult and I am 99% certain that those who can eat gluten wouldn't even miss it while enjoying a quality meal.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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  • Related Articles

    Melissa Blanco
    This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 edition of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.
    Celiac.com 12/11/2009 - I recently embarked on a quest for family-friendly restaurants that offered gluten-free selections.  I explained this vision to my husband and three children as we set the rules of our experiment: five family members to eat at five restaurants during a five week period.  The challenge - the children were to choose the restaurant, the chosen restaurant couldn’t sell Happy Meals or have a drive-thru window and the restaurant had to be a franchise rather than a local venue.  Additionally, the mom, me, and the only celiac in the family, had the option of not eating if it might compromise her small intestines.  Here is what we discovered:
    Restaurant # 1: Applebee’s
    My children chose to eat at Applebee’s on a Sunday afternoon for lunch.  The atmosphere was friendly and a plentiful kids’ menu was offered.  With over 1900 restaurants nationwide and in 15 other countries, according to the company website, it seems there is an Applebee’s almost everywhere.  Additionally, Applebee’s offers a Weight Watcher’s menu for restaurant patrons who are counting points, which led me to hope an allergy/gluten-free menu would also be provided.
    After we were seated, I perused the menu to read this statement, “To our guests with food sensitivities or allergies.  Applebee’s cannot ensure that menu items do not contain ingredients that might cause an allergic reaction.  Please consider this when ordering.”
    I spoke to a manager and asked if a gluten-free menu was available.  I was informed, “Applebee’s policy is not to guarantee allergy-free food.  Our company does not carry a gluten-free menu, but we can modify food.  For example, we can prepare grilled chicken breast strips for kids, rather than giving them breaded chicken fingers.  Again, we don’t guarantee the food will not come in contact with the allergen.”
    Restaurant #2: Red Robin
    The next stop on our restaurant expedition was Red Robin, which also offers an extensive children’s menu.  According to the company website, there are over 430 Red Robin restaurants, in North America.  After we were seated in our booth, I asked our server if a gluten-free menu was available.  She immediately went to the kitchen and returned with a printed Wheat/Gluten Allergen menu.  Printed on the top of the menu was the statement, “Red Robin relied on our suppliers’ statements of ingredients in deciding which products did not contain certain allergens.  Suppliers may change the ingredients in their products or the way they prepare their products, so please check this list to make sure that the menu item you like still meets your dietary requirements.  Red Robin cannot guarantee that any menu item will be prepared completely free of the allergen in question.”
    Gluten-free offerings were grouped in the following categories: salads; salad dressings; burgers; chicken burgers; entrees; and available side dishes.  The Kids’ menu offered a beef patty burger, turkey patty, and chicken-on-a-stick.  It stated: “Kids may also select from any items listed on the Wheat/Gluten menu as adult items to custom design a wheat/gluten free meal for your child.  This menu is current and valid until 10/1/09.”
    I was informed by our server that when a customer orders from the gluten-free menu, an allergy alert is put on their ticket and the area of food preparation is cleaned to avoid cross-contamination.  Additionally, the fries are prepared in oil specifically designated for fries, and those with a gluten allergy should avoid the fry seasoning.
    I ordered off of the Red Robin gluten-free menu and personally recommend the Crispy Chicken Tender Salad with grilled chicken rather than crispy, no garlic bread, and the honey mustard dressing.
    Restaurant #3: Garlic Jim’s Famous Gourmet Pizza
    It was a Friday evening and my children decided they really wanted to eat pizza for dinner.  This led us to almost break our fast food rule by ordering carryout from a pizza restaurant.  Ordering pizza is an extreme challenge for those suffering from gluten intolerance. Therefore, I had to do my research ahead of time.  I called Papa John’s, Domino’s, Papa Murphy’s and Pizza Hut to confirm that gluten-free pizza is not offered, at any of these pizza chains.  I did find a pizza franchise in my state, called Garlic Jim’s, which offers a gluten-free crust. 
    According to the chain website, “Garlic Jim’s is proud to be the first pizza chain accredited for gluten free food service by the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America.”  Garlic Jim’s Famous Gourmet Pizza is currently located in seven states including; Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Colorado, Tennessee, and Florida.
    I was informed at the restaurant that the gluten-free crust is covered with sauce in a separate area in order to avoid cross contamination although the toppings are put on in the same location where wheat-based crusts are prepared.  Different pans and utensils are used in the preparation of this gluten-free thin crust which costs three dollars more than their traditional pizzas.  The restaurant also posts a sign stating that although they do offer gluten-free pizza, they cannot guarantee the pizza will not come in contact with allergens.
    I recommend the gluten-free pepperoni pizza, and can attest that pizza has never tasted so good.
    Restaurant #4:  The Old Spaghetti Factory
    The Old Spaghetti Factory was established in 1969, and as of today, boasts 39 locations nationwide.  I was quite pleased to discover, when my children chose to eat at The Old Spaghetti Factory, that they offer gluten-free pasta.  Before being seated, I inquired at the hostess desk if a gluten-free menu was available and I was presented with a laminated copy. 
    Each entré includes complimentary salad, bread, and ice cream. Obviously, those with gluten intolerance need to give the bread a pass, but there are viable options available for the remainder of the meal.  Gluten-free salad dressings include pesto and vinaigrette—hold the croutons on the salad.  The main course is a rice pasta with the following sauce choices: marinara; meat; mushroom; mizithra cheese, and; brown butter.  Diners also have the option of adding gluten-free sausage and sliced chicken breast to their meal.  For dessert, a choice of spumoni or vanilla ice cream is offered. 
     I ordered the Manager’s Favorite pasta, which includes a combination of two sauces.  I chose gluten-free pasta topped with marinara sauce and mizithra cheese.  My dinner also included a salad with vinaigrette dressing and spumoni for dessert. 
    Restaurant #5: Outback Steakhouse
    Our final dining choice was the Outback Steakhouse which, according to the company’s website, is an Australian Steakhouse with over 950 locations worldwide.  I was offered a gluten-free menu that is nearly as large as the main menu.  Offerings included appetizers, steaks, chicken, seafood, salads, side dishes, and even a brownie dessert.  The entire gluten-free menu is available on the Outback Steakhouse website, www.outback.com .
    Our server was very knowledgeable of gluten intolerance. I ordered off of the gluten-free menu.  When ordering salads, it is recommended that you request that they be mixed separately to avoid cross contamination.  Overall, it was a very pleasant dining experience for my entire family, with a plentiful menu for me and an ample kids’ menu.
    I would certainly recommend what I ordered— Victoria’s Filet with a baked potato and a salad without croutons.  I passed on the bread which accompanies every meal.  It was a pleasant dining experience at what is quite possibly the restaurant that has set the current gold standard for gluten-free dining.
    Overall, our experiment was a great success with four of the five restaurants we visited offering gluten-free menus.  I advise diners to be cautious wherever they eat because even if a company offers gluten-free options you must also take into account the knowledge of the chef preparing your food and the server assisting you.  It is encouraging that major restaurant chains are acknowledging the need to modify their menus for those suffering from gluten intolerance.  Good luck and happy dining.


    Scott Adams
    This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2002 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.
    The results of my latest Celiac.com survey indicate that 71 percent of 983 respondents dine out less often now than before they went on a gluten-free diet.  Further, 74 percent of those who do eat out are now more nervous and uncomfortable during their dining experience, and 50 percent of them felt this way because it is either too much trouble to explain their diet, or because they felt that restaurant employees are in too big of a hurry to worry about their special needs.  As a resident of San Francisco, a city that supposedly has enough table space in its restaurants to seat everyone in the city at once, these results disappoint me.  Not because I eat out less due to my gluten-restricted diet, or am uncomfortable when I do so, but because I don’t believe that anyone with celiac disease who is armed with the proper knowledge needs to fear or avoid eating out.
    In order to eat out safely the first thing that you must check before going into a restaurant is your attitude.  If you are the type of person who is too embarrassed to send your meal back because they didn’t follow your instructions or if you are the opposite type and are so demanding that you often annoy the staff—you will need to find some middle ground.  It took me a while to reach this point, but I can now go into a restaurant with confidence and look at getting a good gluten-free meal there as a personal challenge that begins when I walk through their door. 
    Upon entering a restaurant the first thing that you need to notice is how busy the place is, including how stressed out the workers seem to be—the more stressed out they are, the more tactful you will need to be to get what you want—a safe meal.  One rule that has served me well in all situations is to keep it simple—both your order and how you place it.  I never try to give a scientific discourse on celiac disease to restaurant workers, as I have found that it only serves to frustrate or confuse them.  Tell them only what they need to know—that you have an allergy to wheat (using the term gluten will typically lead back into long explanations) and need to make sure that your dish is wheat-free.  I wouldn’t tell them that you’ll get violently ill if ANY wheat ends up in your meal, as some people recommend, because they probably won’t want to serve you.  I also wouldn’t go into detail about hidden ingredients that contain wheat—it will take too long to explain and you will again run the risk of scaring them into not serving you. 
    I usually don’t approach the chef unless it’s very slow because he is probably the busiest person in a restaurant.  When it’s busy I always ask the waiter to give the chef special order instructions, both verbally and in writing on the order ticket.  Rather than try to educate the staff and make them experts on gluten, it’s far more efficient if you are the one who becomes more educated with regard to the dishes you like to eat so that you can order them in a manner that will ensure your safety.  I strongly believe that your diet is ultimately your responsibility and not a restaurant’s (with the exception of any mistakes that they might make).
    The key to ordering a gluten-free meal is your beforehand knowledge of its ingredients and how it is prepared.  Most people who have cooked have a basic understanding of how certain dishes are prepared, and how they could contain gluten.  Even if you aren’t a cook you might have had the meal you want to order enough times to know something about its ingredients and preparation methods.  You need only to know enough about the meal to ask the right questions so that you can alter any preparation methods that might cause it to contain gluten.  For example, whenever I order a salad I always tell them no croutons, and to bring me olive oil and vinegar for dressing.  If I order fried rice in a Chinese restaurant I order it without soy sauce, or I give them my own bottle to cook with.  If you order something properly and it arrives incorrectly, send it back!  I recently ordered Chinese food with my family and did everything right—I told them about my wheat allergy, gave them my bottle of soy sauce, and told the waitress that I wanted to make sure that there was no wheat flour in or on anything that I ordered (but that corn starch is fine—if you don’t clarify this point it might unnecessarily eliminate or alter many Chinese dishes).  When our food arrived the chicken I ordered was breaded.  After inquiring about it I found out that they used wheat flour so I sent it back, the waitress apologized, and it was no big deal.
    I recommend that you purchase and read basic cookbooks for the types of foods that you like to eat so that you can place your order with confidence.  For example, I own several cookbooks for my favorite cuisines, including ones that cover Mexican, Chinese, Thai, Italian, Vietnamese, Indian and American foods.  I typically look over the relevant cookbook before I go to a particular restaurant so that I can get an idea of what I want to order and how to order it.  The more up-front knowledge you have about how the dishes you like are prepared, the easier it will be for you to order them in a manner that ensures that they are safe.  Having these books around is also great should you begin to cook more at home, which 65 percent of my survey respondents already do, and this is something that I also highly recommend.
    Generally speaking I try to avoid large chain restaurants as much as possible because many of their items are highly processed and contain a huge number of ingredients.  Their employees typically have no idea what’s in their foods.  I think that many of the survey respondents are with me on this, as 70 percent of them also eat less processed and junk foods due to their gluten-free diets.  I only eat at chain restaurants if I am able to check their Web sites in advance for safe items, and if I can’t do this I am extra careful about what I order.  I try to eat at smaller, family-owned establishments because they usually know the ingredients and preparation methods for all of their dishes.  Additionally, authentic ethnic foods such as Mexican, Vietnamese, Thai, Indian, Indonesian, Japanese and Korean typically use little wheat, so I lean more towards these types of foods when I eat out. 
    The transition to a gluten-free diet isn’t easy—74 percent of survey respondents thought it was difficult or very difficult.  Like many things in life, it took some up-front work on your part to be able to make the successful transition to a gluten-free diet, and the same is true for eating out.  I like to think that what you put into it, you will get out of it—the more you learn about cuisine and its various methods of preparation, the more pleasant and care-free your dining experiences will be, and the more likely you will be to get a safe meal.  Life’s too short to not enjoy the basic pleasure of eating out, so the next time you get the urge, do your homework first, then take charge of your meal at the restaurant!


    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 10/17/2012 - This article originally appeared in the Winter 2012 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.
    It’s estimated that of the 3 million Americans with celiac disease, an autoimmune disease triggered by exposure to gluten-a protein component of wheat, barley, and rye-only 3% have been diagnosed. The good news for celiac patients who have been diagnosed is that the treatment for their condition is simple and doesn’t require the ingestion of drugs--a gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, celiac patients must deal with several challenges in maintaining a diet free of gluten, specifically the expenses involved. Compared with “regular” gluten-containing foods, gluten-free alternatives are more expensive. In fact, a study has indicated that gluten-free foods cost more than double their gluten-containing counterparts.
    In a study by the Dalhousie Medical School at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, prices were compared between food products labeled as “gluten-free” with comparable gluten-containing food products at two large-sized chain grocery stores. Unit prices of the food items in dollars per 100 grams were calculated for this purpose. According to the study, all the 56 gluten-free products were more expensive than their corresponding products. The average unit price for gluten-free products was found to be $1.71, compared with $0.61 for the gluten-containing products. This means that gluten-free products were 242% more expensive than gluten-containing items.
    Fortunately, celiac patients can receive tax deductions for certain expenses related with their gluten-free diet. To receive these benefits, celiacs must provide a doctor’s note confirming their celiac diagnosis and save their receipts for all their gluten-free foods and other products they purchase. The difference between the prices of gluten-free items compared to those of regular items is tax-deductible. Products that don’t have a gluten-containing counterpart, such as xanthan gum and sorghum flour, are totally tax-deductible. Shipping costs for online orders of gluten-free items are also tax-deductible. In order to file your claim, you should fill out a 1049 schedule A for medical deductions. For more information, contact a qualified accountant.
    There are other ways to avoid spending loads of money on gluten-free foods. For instance, stay away from gluten-free processed and “junk” foods such as snack foods and desserts made with refined carbohydrates and sugar and lacking nutrients. Not only will you save money, but you’ll safeguard your health. I recommend making meals comprised of nutritious, naturally gluten-free whole foods at home such as fruits, vegetables, dairy products, poultry, fish, meats, nuts and seeds, and eggs. These foods are packed with vital nutrients and don’t carry any additional costs. Make sure that no gluten has been added to such foods and they are safe from cross-contamination.
    Another way to save money is to make your own gluten-free mixes yourself, such as the ones I recommend on my gluten-free website. Instead of buying expensive commercial gluten-free baking mixes, you can create your own gluten-free flour mixes for a variety of foods such as pancakes, pizza, rolls, and muffins and store them conveniently in your refrigerator or freezer. I also recommend purchasing gluten-free ingredients in bulk online, as many websites offer great deals. These are just a few of the ways to save money on the gluten-free diet.
    It is unfortunate that gluten-free foods are more expensive than “regular” food items, especially to such an extraordinary degree, however savvy gluten-free dieters can through tax deductions and smart shopping choices cut down on their expenses. Perhaps in the future we will see a decrease in gluten-free food pricing, but one thing is for sure-we should consider ourselves lucky that we have found an answer to our health problems. Even if the gluten-free diet is expensive, at least it’s the road to greater health and quality of life.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2013 - A restaurant owned by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver has been fined over $12,000 after a customer with celiac disease was sickened by eating regular pasta, instead of gluten-free pasta she was supposed to receive.
    The fine resolves a complaint brought by 38-year-old Kristy Richardson, who dined in 2011 at Jamie's Italian in Porstmouth, U.K. Richardson suffers from celiac disease.
    According to reports in the Telegraph, Richardson asked three different staff members to make sure she received gluten-free pasta, but she somehow received regular pasta. As a result, she became "violently ill," with nausea and vomiting that lasted for days and which left her weak for months, according to news reports.
    This in itself might be bad enough for most people, but, at the time, Richardson was on a waiting list for a heart and lung transplant. According to reports in the Sun, her gluten-triggered illness was so severe that her doctors temporarily removed her from that list; potentially depriving her of a transplant opportunity.
    Richardson complained, authorities became involved, charges were filed, and the restaurant eventually pleaded guilty to "selling food not of the nature, substance or quality demanded by a purchaser," according to the Telegraph.
    The fine is in addition to the nearly $4,000 previously awarded to Richardson in a civil case over the matter. What do you think? Should restaurants be fined if their gluten-free food contains gluten. Does it matter whether it makes people sick?

  • Recent Articles

    Christina Kantzavelos
    Celiac.com 07/20/2018 - During my Vipassana retreat, I wasn’t left with much to eat during breakfast, at least in terms of gluten free options. Even with gluten free bread, the toasters weren’t separated to prevent cross contamination. All of my other options were full of sugar (cereals, fruits), which I try to avoid, especially for breakfast. I had to come up with something that did not have sugar, was tasty, salty, and gave me some form of protein. After about four days of mixing and matching, I was finally able to come up with the strangest concoction, that may not look the prettiest, but sure tastes delicious. Actually, if you squint your eyes just enough, it tastes like buttery popcorn. I now can’t stop eating it as a snack at home, and would like to share it with others who are looking for a yummy nutritious snack. 
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/19/2018 - Maintaining a gluten-free diet can be an on-going challenge, especially when you factor in all the hidden or obscure gluten that can trip you up. In many cases, foods that are naturally gluten-free end up contain added gluten. Sometimes this can slip by us, and that when the suffering begins. To avoid suffering needlessly, be sure to keep a sharp eye on labels, and beware of added or hidden gluten, even in food labeled gluten-free.  Use Celiac.com's SAFE Gluten-Free Food List and UNSAFE Gluten-free Food List as a guide.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/18/2018 - Despite many studies on immune development in children, there still isn’t much good data on how a mother’s diet during pregnancy and infancy influences a child’s immune development.  A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether changes in maternal or infant diet might influence the risk of allergies or autoimmune disease.
    The team included Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, Despo Ierodiakonou, Katharine Jarrold, Sergio Cunha,  Jennifer Chivinge, Zoe Robinson, Natalie Geoghegan, Alisha Ruparelia, Pooja Devani, Marialena Trivella, Jo Leonardi-Bee, and Robert J. Boyle.
    They are variously associated with the Department of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease More Common in Women and Girls International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; the Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Section of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; and Stanford University in the USA.
    Team members searched MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Web of Science, Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) for observational studies conducted between January 1946 and July 2013, and interventional studies conducted through December 2017, that evaluated the relationship between diet during pregnancy, lactation, or the first year of life, and future risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    They then selected studies, extracted data, and assessed bias risk. They evaluated data using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). They found 260 original studies, covering 964,143 participants, of milk feeding, including 1 intervention trial of breastfeeding promotion, and 173 original studies, covering 542,672 participants, of other maternal or infant dietary exposures, including 80 trials of 26 maternal, 32 infant, or 22 combined interventions. 
    They found a high bias risk in nearly half of the more than 250 milk feeding studies and in about one-quarter of studies of other dietary exposures. Evidence from 19 intervention trials suggests that oral supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of eczema. 44 cases per 1,000; 95% CI 20–64), and 6 trials, suggest that fish oil supplementation during pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of allergic sensitization to egg. GRADE certainty of these findings was moderate. 
    The team found less evidence, and low GRADE certainty, for claims that breastfeeding reduces eczema risk during infancy, that longer exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced type 1 diabetes mellitus, and that probiotics reduce risk of infants developing allergies to cow’s milk. 
    They found no evidence that dietary exposure to other factors, including prebiotic supplements, maternal allergenic food avoidance, and vitamin, mineral, fruit, and vegetable intake, influence risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    Overall, the team’s findings support a connection between the mother’s diet and risk of immune-mediated diseases in the child. Maternal probiotic and fish oil supplementation may reduce risk of eczema and allergic sensitization to food, respectively.
    Stay tuned for more on diet during pregnancy and its role in celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi:  10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/17/2018 - What can fat soluble vitamin levels in newly diagnosed children tell us about celiac disease? A team of researchers recently assessed fat soluble vitamin levels in children diagnosed with newly celiac disease to determine whether vitamin levels needed to be assessed routinely in these patients during diagnosis.
    The researchers evaluated the symptoms of celiac patients in a newly diagnosed pediatric group and evaluated their fat soluble vitamin levels and intestinal biopsies, and then compared their vitamin levels with those of a healthy control group.
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    The team evaluated 27 female, 25 male celiac patients, and an evenly divided group of 50 healthy control subjects. Patients averaged 9 years, and weighed 16.2 kg. The most common symptom in celiac patients was growth retardation, which was seen in 61.5%, with  abdominal pain next at 51.9%, and diarrhea, seen in 11.5%. Histological examination showed nearly half of the patients at grade Marsh 3B. 
    Vitamin A and vitamin D levels for celiac patients were significantly lower than the control group. Vitamin A and vitamin D deficiencies were significantly more common compared to healthy subjects. Nearly all of the celiac patients showed vitamin D insufficiency, while nearly 62% showed vitamin D deficiency. Nearly 33% of celiac patients showed vitamin A deficiency. 
    The team saw no deficiencies in vitamin E or vitamin K1 among celiac patients. In the healthy control group, vitamin D deficiency was seen in 2 (4%) patients, vitamin D insufficiency was determined in 9 (18%) patients. The team found normal levels of all other vitamins in the healthy group.
    Children with newly diagnosed celiac disease showed significantly reduced levels of vitamin D and A. The team recommends screening of vitamin A and D levels during diagnosis of these patients.
    Source:
    BMC Pediatrics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/16/2018 - Did weak public oversight leave Arizonans ripe for Theranos’ faulty blood tests scam? Scandal-plagued blood-testing company Theranos deceived Arizona officials and patients by selling unproven, unreliable products that produced faulty medical results, according to a new book by Wall Street Journal reporter, whose in-depth, comprehensive investigation of the company uncovered deceit, abuse, and potential fraud.
    Moreover, Arizona government officials facilitated the deception by providing weak regulatory oversight that essentially left patients as guinea pigs, said the book’s author, investigative reporter John Carreyrou. 
    In the newly released "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup," Carreyrou documents how Theranos and its upstart founder, Elizabeth Holmes, used overblown marketing claims and questionable sales tactics to push faulty products that resulted in consistently faulty blood tests results. Flawed results included tests for celiac disease and numerous other serious, and potentially life-threatening, conditions.
    According to Carreyrou, Theranos’ lies and deceit made Arizonans into guinea pigs in what amounted to a "big, unauthorized medical experiment.” Even though founder Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos duped numerous people, including seemingly savvy investors, Carreyrou points out that there were public facts available to elected officials back then, like a complete lack of clinical data on the company's testing and no approvals from the Food and Drug Administration for any of its tests.
    SEC recently charged the now disgraced Holmes with what it called a 'years-long fraud.’ The company’s value has plummeted, and it is now nearly worthless, and facing dozens, and possibly hundreds of lawsuits from angry investors. Meantime, Theranos will pay Arizona consumers $4.65 million under a consumer-fraud settlement Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich negotiated with the embattled blood-testing company.
    Both investors and Arizona officials, “could have picked up on those things or asked more questions or kicked the tires more," Carreyrou said. Unlike other states, such as New York, Arizona lacks robust laboratory oversight that would likely have prevented Theranos from operating in those places, he added.
    Stay tuned for more new on how the Theranos fraud story plays out.
    Read more at azcentral.com.