21735 "Free-From" Peanut Butter Cookies (Gluten-Free) - Celiac.com
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"Free-From" Peanut Butter Cookies (Gluten-Free)

Ok, I know these cookies aren't free from peanuts, but they are peanut butter cookies, after all!  If you can do almonds, but not peanuts, definitely try this recipe with almond butter – yum!

For the rest of us with other dietary restrictions, take heart! These cookies fit the bill! They're delicious, and still gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free, soy-free, and sugar-free! Yes, they even have a low glycemic index! Enjoy these cookies on their own, or add chocolate chips (dairy-free chips are great too!) for a change of pace. High protein, loads of vitamins and minerals, dietary fiber – it's all there, and in a cookie!!!  Maybe I should have called these “Guilt-Free Cookies”!!!

Don't be daunted by some of the unusual flour ingredients. Try them if you will, or just use my all purpose blend instead, for a quick and easy recipe substitution.

Ingredients:
1 ½ cups peanut butter (natural or no sugar added)
¾ cup agave nectar (light or dark)
1 Tbs. gluten-free vanilla extract
¼ cup unsweetened applesauce
½ tsp. salt
1 cup Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour*
¾ cup buckwheat flour (or Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour)
2 Tbs. mesquite flour (or Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour)
2 Tbs. almond meal (or Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour)
½ cup+ chocolate chips (optional)
Cinnamon and sugar (or granulated splenda) mixture (or cinnamon only) for tops of cookies

*Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour may be made using the recipe found in my cookbook, Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating, or on my Web site.

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Directions:
Preheat oven to 350 F.

Blend peanut butter and all liquid ingredients together, then add in the dry ingredients, mixing until fully incorporated.

Prepare a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Roll balls of dough approximately the size of ping pong balls in your hands and place on the prepared cookie sheet. Dip a fork in the cinnamon-sugar mixture and press into each cookie to flatten with a criss-cross design.


Bake for 10-12 minutes and remove to cool on the pan.

Peanut Butter Cookies
Finished "Free-From" Peanut Butter Cookies


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2 Responses:

 
Jeff
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said this on
09 Feb 2009 11:40:47 PM PDT
Great recipe, but you should be promoting this as free of all of the top 8 allergens except for peanuts. You left out the fact that it is milk free, and milk is one of the most common allergens in the top 8!

 
Mary
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
14 May 2009 9:45:26 AM PDT
I have actually made almost all of Jules' recipes without milk (even if the recipe calls for it, the substitutions are very easy and she usually lets you know what's best to add in its place). That's why I use her recipes - because with her flour, you know what you're baking is going to turn great even if you have to make substitutions. These cookies are great, just like everything else I've made using Jule's recipes.




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Thank you ps, it may be better if the thread title was changed as we now have two 'overwhelmed' topics. If it were 'Bile ducts and celiac?' then it may attract more users with direct experience?

Hello and welcome Maybe? From reading others accounts there's a big variation in how quickly gluten antibodies respond to the gluten diet. I did similar to you and my doctor said that 1 week back on should be enough to show up in a test, but he didn't know what he was talking about sadly... The 2 week figure refers to the endoscopy, for blood testing 8-12 weeks on gluten is more normal. Basically if it comes back positive fine you have your answer. If its negative it may be a false negative due to your going gluten free beforehand. If you want to pursue a diagnosis then yes. Don't go off gluten again until you confirm that all testing is complete. Keep a journal noting any symptoms, that may be useful to you later. More info here: There's some good info in the site faq: https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/announcement/3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/ I know how you feel! Partway through my gluten challenge I knew that too results notwithstanding. Fwiw I think you've found your answer. Good luck!

Learn more about testing for celiac disease here: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/ You do have to be on a gluten diet for ANY of the celiac tests (blood and biopsy) to work. While the endoscopy (with biopsies) can reveal villi damage, many other things besides celiac disease can cause villi damage too: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/what-else-can-cause-damage-to-the-small-intestine-other-than-celiac-disease/ So, both the blood test and endoscopy are usually ordered. There are some exceptions, but those are not common.

Exactly what are your allergy symptoms? Were they IgG or IgE? Allergy testing as a whole is not super accurate -- especially the IgG. Were you on any H1 or H2 antihistamines for the last five days when you were tested? As far as celiac testing, four days without consuming gluten probably would not impact testing.

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