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Great Gluten-free Bread from USDA Scientists?


USDA scientists may have craked the code to great gluten-free bread.

Celiac.com 01/13/2011 - It might be rocket science, after all. Well, sort of. It turns out that engineering a good loaf of gluten-free bread is the focus of some of the best scientific minds in the food business.

It also turns out that scientists with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in Manhattan, Kansas, have developed a process that produces a high-quality, gluten-free bread.

Such bread, if produced on a large scale, might benefit the millions of Americans with celiac disease who are unable to digest gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. Gluten-free grains include corn, sorghum, and rice, among others.

The new bread-making process is the work of chemists Scott Bean and Tilman Schober at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Grain Quality and Structure Research Unit.

They discovered that removing a certain amount of fat from a corn protein called zein, allowed them to craft a gluten-free dough that is more like wheat dough, and free-standing, bakery-type rolls are more like traditional wheat rolls. ARS is the chief intramural scientific research agency of USDA.

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Bean and Schober had some success crafting gluten-free pan bread using other grains, but they were unable to make free-standing rolls because the rolls expanded too much. According to Bean, the resulting bread was lower quality than comparable wheat bread.

Bean and Schober had shown earlier that zein-a readily available byproduct from corn wet milling and fuel-ethanol production-could be used to make dough that was more similar to wheat dough. The dough still didn't meet their standards, though, because the rolls produced from it were crumbly and flat.

Removing more of the fat from the zein protein's surface, Bean and Schober found, allowed the proteins to stick to each other much like wheat proteins do, giving the zein-based dough  elastic properties similar to wheat dough.

Bean and Schober's findings may also apply to sorghum, which, says Bean, may prove to be a better grain to use since it is a gluten-free grain.

The team used corn as an intermediate step toward to achieve the ideal standard for gluten-free breads: a wheat-flour-like dough made with non-wheat proteins, resulting in products with a fluffy, light texture.

This research may prove useful in creating commercial, gluten-free bread for the 2 to 3 million Americans who have celiac disease. For many of those folks, tasty, gluten-free breads and rolls from corn, rice and sorghum would be a welcome addition to their diet.

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7 Responses:

 
j patty smollen
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said this on
17 Jan 2011 7:16:45 AM PDT
Awesome can't wait to try it.

 
LaRayne Betlach
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
17 Jan 2011 11:38:36 AM PDT
Sounds like a break-through in better tasting gluten free bread!!

 
Andrea
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
17 Jan 2011 4:00:08 PM PDT
This is great that people are working on this. I hope to see more gluten free bread available at a higher quality. But since most corn is genetically modified I hope they work on alternatives.

 
Margaret P
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said this on
17 Jan 2011 6:44:50 PM PDT
Those of us who must avoid corn can't eat these cookies. I don't know what part of the corn causes the problems, but I'm not taking any chances after diarrhea from Xylitol derived from corn!

 
Gale Elliott
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said this on
18 Jan 2011 2:30:52 PM PDT
Hope they get it ready for general use soon!!

 
Paul
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said this on
19 Jan 2011 6:57:19 AM PDT
Bean & Schober Baked Goods ... has an interesting ring to it no? Hopefully they won't neglect flavor while focusing on all this gluten free science.

 
betsy frahm
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said this on
31 Jan 2011 2:01:33 PM PDT
I cannot wait for a good bread to come out. I always said that I could live on bread and gravy, both of which I cannot have. Because I do not have bad reactions to gluten except for a bump or two occasionally, I tend to cheat with bread. But if I had a GF bread to satisfy my hunger for sandwiches, I wouldn't cheat and would stop silently harming my body.




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So I've been gluten free for 6 months. I gave it up the day of my endoscopy and never looked back. I was a fairly silent Celiac. My blood work was always normal (never anemic, malnourished), I didn't have all the horrible symptoms that others do. I think I caught it early and that those things were definitely coming. Since going gluten-free I notice that my belly is better. I still have days where it's not great, but in the last month I've noticed that it's consistently pretty good. I don't hardly ever get stomach aches. I've lost 16 lbs and I'm never bloated. Those things are good. But, aside from that, I don't feel much different than I did before. I'm still tired a lot. But I have two kids under 4 and I run a non-profit. I have horrible anxiety and that's only increased since finding out about my Celiac (it's health anxiety and it freaked me out big time that I have an AI disorder). I feel like my complexion looks the same (never had an issue with that). I just read stories on here that talk about how the brain fog lifted quickly, or how people don't feel tired anymore, etc. I'm still a zombie sometimes. Has anyone else has this experience? Maybe my body was doing such a good job compensating for my Celiac that I wasn't really very symptomatic to begin with - and that the tiredness I feel isn't due to gluten. Oh, FYI, I had a full thyroid panel done in December and it was all normal.

Your daughter could have non celiac gluten sensitivity. That would correspond to negative celiac tests coupled with positive reaction to the gluten free diet. Whilst there are similarities to celiac presentation it appears that neuro symptoms are more common in ncgs patients. That seems to be the case for me anyway! The condition is as yet poorly understood but there is progress being made, check out a topic I just started on the pre diagnosis thread with some info and links. The remarks by umberto Volta in particular are just about the best summation I've yet seen on where the research is at. I will post a link later.

The gi may be able to see some signs of celiac visually but the chances are you will have to wait a couple of weeks for the biopsies before there's any confirmation. The damage to the villi is too small to detect with naked eye I think. as long as your eating some gluten each day you will have done all you can for a diagnosis. Not long now so go ahead and treat yourself to a nice cheesecake, fish and chips etc.

check out CoQ10, not related to celiac (as far as I know) but for balance issues.

remind your hubby, "if mama ain't happy, ain't nobody gonna be happy."