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Tennis Champ Djokovic Talks Game Changing Gluten-free Diet

Celiac.com 09/29/2015 - In his new autobiography, world number one tennis player Novak Djokovic opens up about how positive blood screens for gluten antibodies changed his diet, and how his diet changed his career.

Novak Djokovic at the French Open. Photo: CC--TatianaThrough 2010, Djokovic had seen some notable late-match collapses, and was even forced to drop out from competitions due to health reasons. Many thought his career in peril.

He was referred to doctor Igor Cetojevic, M.D, who recommended several tests, including an ELISA test. ELISA is a common test for malaria and HIV, but it can also be used in the determination of food allergies. Djokovic’s ELISA indicated an intolerance to wheat and dairy products.

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The doctor immediately advised Djokovic to change his diet, especially to eliminate high-gluten foods like bread.

The scientific evidence is pretty strong that a gluten-free diet is only useful for athletic performance if the athlete is gluten-free, and here is a case where it seems to have made the difference.

After adopting a fairly strict gluten-free diet, especially during training and match play, Djokovic has seen remarkable success on the court. He has played strong, injury-free tennis and has won multiple grand slam titles with nearly zero defeats, and no late-match bonking of days past.

Read more at Healthaim.com.

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