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Is the Global Gluten-free Pet Food Market Set to Explode?

Is gluten-free pet food the next great investment?


Could gluten-free pet food be the next big thing? Photo: CC--Franchise Opportunities.

Celiac.com 08/04/2017 - Industry analysts are projecting the global market for gluten-free pet foods to enjoy growth of up to 25% a year over the next decade. Across numerous industries, a shift from products containing gluten to gluten-free products is creating major potential for manufacturers.

The latest market report from Persistence Market Researchers, titled Global Gluten-free Pet Food Market: Drivers and Restraints, projects double-digit growth in gluten-free pet food markets through 2025.

The report offers market information and analysis on all segments of the global gluten-free pet food market broken down by type, flavor, specification, form, and distribution channel. Types include natural and added additives, while flavor types are further divided into chicken, beef, fish, and other red meat and white meats.

Specification covers the type of pet, such as food for cats, for dogs, for birds, for pocket animals, and others. The report breaks down each of these categories.

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In terms of distribution channel, the global gluten-free pet food market report includes information on e-commerce, supermarkets, retail shops, exclusive pet shops, and others. Form type includes information on dry and wet pet food market segments.

Gluten-free pet food is a new segment in the pet food industry, and has strong potential to displace regular pet foods.

North America currently leads the world in gluten-free pet food production. Currently, there are no gluten-free pet food manufacturers in Europe.

Meanwhile, North America and Europe are currently the largest consumers of gluten-free pet food products followed by Asia Pacific.

A Sample of this Report is Available Upon Request at: PersistenceMarketResearch.com

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












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2 Responses:

 
Tania J Malven
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
07 Aug 2017 3:52:25 PM PDT
Our dog was diagnosed with inflammatory bowel syndrome at age 2. Rx: diet free of wheat, corn, soy, dairy, beef, chicken and eggs. He did very well for the next 11.5 years!

 
Kay2
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
08 Aug 2017 9:52:51 PM PDT
My dog doesn't have celiac, I do. But to avoid cross contamination issues and keep life simple, my dog gets a grain free food. It's simply one less thing to worry about.




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I would stick to a very basic gluten-free diet as recommended by Dr. Fasano and other celiac experts. It would not hurt for a short amount of time and might get him through his exams. This is the study about dealing with Trace Amounts of Hidden Gluten (not saying your son has non-responsi...

Yes do follow up with testing, once confirmed we can help you along the road. Other intolerance and allergies are very common with this disease. Lactose is broken down by enzymes produced by the tips of your villi in your intestines, they are normally the most damaged and in some cases just gone....

Please follow the advice of celiac experts and get your daughter tested before going gluten free, Your doctor, like many, is woefully misinformed. You should be tested too (all first degree relatives), even if symptom free, and especially since your mother was recently diagnosed. Learn more a...

We in the UK he takes a pack lunch and have asked for a health plan so wait and see. Not easy when he taking his gcse and he wants to do well. Thanks for the advice

My daughter, who does not have celiac disease, is also in the 11th grade. Since you said exams instead of finals, I assume you are not in the US where a 504 plan can accommodate anyone with a disability (celiac disease counts). This includes tudors, more time to complete tests, etc. Do you hav...