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Gluten-free Foods Have Lots of Salt

Many gluten-free foods and snacks are heavy on the salt, says a new study.


Are gluten-free foods and snacks too salty? Photo: CC-- Ian Watson

Celiac.com 08/29/2017 - The popularity of gluten-free products has soared, despite little evidence that gluten-free products are beneficial for people who do not have celiac disease.

The number and range of gluten-free products continue to grow at a rapid pace, and manufacturers are adding more all the time. The proliferation of gluten-free products is inviting the scrutiny of nutritionists, some of whom are arraigning the alarm about questionable nutrition of many gluten-free foods and snacks.

Recent products tests show that the vast majority of gluten-free snacks tested are far saltier than their non-gluten-free alternatives, say researchers. Just how much saltier? Researchers surveyed a total of 106 products, and found that many gluten-free snacks have up to five times more salt than non-gluten-free counterparts. And only a third of these products have proper warnings on their labels, according to a separate study by health campaigners.

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The team also compared salt content for each product in a particular category to the salt content (per 100g) of a randomly chosen gluten-containing equivalent product of that category. Notable differences in salt content include:

  • Schar Gluten Free Pretzels (3.0/100g), twice the salt of Sainsbury's Salted Pretzels (1.5g/100g)
  • Mrs Crimble's Original Cheese Crackers (3.5/100g), 2.5 times the salt of Ritz Original Crackers (1.38/100g)
  • The Snack Organisation Sweet Chilli Rice Crackers (2.6/100g), 3 times as salty as Aldi's The Foodie Market Crunchy Chilli Rice Snacks (0.84/100g)

These revelations invite questions about whether health-conscious shoppers are being misled.

Nutritionists are urging shoppers to look past clever packaging, and to not automatically assume that "gluten-free" foods are healthy.

Full Survey Data: Actiononsalt.org

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1 Response:

 
Jeff L*
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
04 Sep 2017 9:26:13 AM PDT
"These revelations invite questions about whether health-conscious shoppers are being misled."rnrnIndeed, I wonder whether we health-conscious shoppers have been misled for decades... being told about how dangerous salt is, when in fact there's little basis for the dire warnings.rnrnYou might consider reading this book: "The Salt Fix: Why the Experts Got It All Wrong--and How Eating More Might Save Your Life" by James DiNicolantoniorn




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Interesting article. I do wonder how she was 'misdiagnosed' though and how she came to the conclusion she wasn't celiac.

Try dropping the oats for while and see if that helps. Some of us, myself included, react to even the ones that are certified as gluten free.

Hey guys, I appreciate the input, you are all very sweet and kind. I do not eat out at all. Only eat food I cook. No alcohol. Only certified gluten-free oats, grains, rice, etc. I have 3 roommates in a little house. I have my own gluten-free section to cook and prepare foo...

What was your gluten free diet like? I wonder if, when you were gluten-free, you went more whole food, less processed food? Or did you continue to eat processed food that was just gluten free? One reason I ask is that I have cut way back on grains and processed foods like gluten-free bread, but o...

Equal parts Hershey Coco Powder and a sweetener with a pinch of salt. Super easy to make your own. I like adding a bit to my coffee with almond milk, and lakanto sugar free maple, or a bit of monk fruit or stevia. PS you might want to drop dairy milk. The enzymes to break it down come from th...