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Adclaure

Daughters Enterolab results-need help!

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I've suspected my 6 year old has gluten sensitivity for years now. Her blood test came back negative so I ordered the Enterolab test. I was blown away by her anti-gliadin #. How accurate is Enterolab? Can we reintroduce dairy down the road? These are her results:

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA      406 Units   (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA      98 Units   (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA      26 Units   (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-soy IgA      39 Units   (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

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As far as I have heard, they mean nothing.  Sorry.  

Did she have actual Celiac blood tests?  And was she eating gluten at the time?  

 

 

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/why-dont-you-recognize-tests-stool-tests-or-otherwise-for-gluten-sensitivity-that-are-currently-available-through-companies-like-enterolab-or-cyrex/

 

"...ecause of this, we must make our decisions based on what hasbeen published; Harvard, UCSD, and the American College of Gastroenterology all agree that stool tests are simply not sensitive or specific enough methods in screening for celiac disease. We can say therefore with confidence that the test currently being used by these labs is not good enough..."

 

Edited by kareng

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The enterolab test corroborated what I already knew, in my case.  So why are you so concerned about tests?  Why don't you just have her go gluten free and see what happens to symptoms?  BTW, my dairy sensitivity went away after I had been gluten-free for several years.

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If she doesn't have a bonafied dx by a MEDICAL DOCTOR then she will not be protected at school & later in college. 

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1 hour ago, etbtbfs said:

The enterolab test corroborated what I already knew, in my case.  So why are you so concerned about tests?  Why don't you just have her go gluten free and see what happens to symptoms?  BTW, my dairy sensitivity went away after I had been gluten-free for several years.

Obviously there's always the option to exclude gluten independent of tests but it's a big step for a young kid. There are a lot of sacrifices to make, a lot of birthday parties etc where she will potentially miss out etc. etc. I think Adclaure has every reason to try and work on objective evidence if possible. It's the responsible course of action in my view. 

Adclaure I have no knowledge of the tests but I wish you and your daughter the best. You may find this article interesting before taking a decision on gluten:

http://bottomlineinc.com/before-you-give-up-gluten-try-a-low-fodmap-diet/

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Now I'm really confused because her gene test (blood work) came back negative for both genes. The doctor said there is no way she could have celiac. But does that also mean there is no way she is gluten sensitive? Europe regocnizes 7 genes for celiac so I'm wondering if she actually is sensitive to gluten and this test  isn't good enough?

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On 6/20/2016 at 3:42 PM, Adclaure said:

Now I'm really confused because her gene test (blood work) came back negative for both genes. The doctor said there is no way she could have celiac. But does that also mean there is no way she is gluten sensitive? Europe regocnizes 7 genes for celiac so I'm wondering if she actually is sensitive to gluten and this test  isn't good enough?

your doctor is wrong, ....

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While it is less likely someone without either of the 2 Celiac genes actually has Celiac, it is not impossible.  She may be gluten sensitive but you should make the effort to find out if it is Celiac vs. gluten sensitivity because with Celiac, damage occurs to the small intestine. That is really important to know.

As far as being protected in school, you would need a plan for primary school up to age 18.  They are not so good sometimes at understanding Celiac and doing the right things.  However, college is changing at a rapid pace and many colleges will provide gluten free food without a doctor's note. My niece does not have a diagnosis but gets really sick like I do when she eats gluten. She attends Ithaca College in NY state and they accommodate anyone who needs to eat gluten free. She was never mandated to prove she has it. I think by the time kids today reach college, it will be even easier. This is a money thing also......colleges do not want to lose business because they cannot accommodate dietary needs. 

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