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Ennis_TX

Eating out and Discrimination

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Found this article about a 11 year old with celiac who was forced to eat outside after being told he could not bring and eat his own "Safe" food into Shields Tavern. Biggest point was the social impact it had on the kid and the way it was handled.

I think this will bring up a new perspective and in the end perhaps open more restaurants to understanding that some of us have to bring own food to a gathering for our own safety and that ousting us for it is actual discrimination with legal implications. I personally bring my own food when I eat out, I tip big for it if they are understanding and normally order a 1 ingredient side to simplify it with the least chance of contamination. This is something many of us do to meet a compromise and interact in a social environment, and feel normal. While it really depends on person to person and how sensitive/comfortable you are eating out, heading out to accompany and eat with family, friends, and coworkers should be a option, even if we have to bring our own food as a compromise.

http://wydaily.com/2017/07/20/family-of-disabled-11-year-old-sues-colonial-williamsburg-for-discrimination-nws/

On a side note remember not every chain and store are the same, always talk to a manager, or call ahead before bringing in your own food, or eating out with special requirements, dietary restrictions, or extreme food allergies/intolerance.

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I am not sure this was handled properly by ALL the adults in charge!  Most restaurants discourage bringing in food because of local health regulations -- not because they are trying to make you buy their food.    Some restaurants will overlook this.  I suspect this was handled poorly by the child's parent.  He should have called in advance and talked directly to a manager and not wait staff.  The parent could have prevented this humiliating experience.  Life is hard.  Kids  adjust.  

We have eaten in that very tavern.  Okay, my kid ate.  Hubby and I consumed our gluten-free picnic meal in the common areas.  We just ordered a drink and enjoyed the ambiance.  My 7 year old daughter was dressed in a period costume I sewed.  We had a fabulous experience in Williamsburg.  

Edited by cyclinglady
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I don't think we have heard the whole story.  I have heard from several people that have been to that tavern and were able to eat gluten-free.  

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As for the ADA - that doesn't mean we have the "right" to eat out for fun.  It has provisions for what is reasonable for the business.  I think it applies better to circumstances where you have no choice but to eat the food - like a college dorm.

Edited by kareng

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6 hours ago, Ennis_TX said:

Found this article about a 11 year old with celiac who was forced to eat outside after being told he could not bring and eat his own "Safe" food into Shields Tavern. Biggest point was the social impact it had on the kid and the way it was handled.

I think this will bring up a new perspective and in the end perhaps open more restaurants to understanding that some of us have to bring own food to a gathering for our own safety and that ousting us for it is actual discrimination with legal implications. I personally bring my own food when I eat out, I tip big for it if they are understanding and normally order a 1 ingredient side to simplify it with the least chance of contamination. This is something many of us do to meet a compromise and interact in a social environment, and feel normal. While it really depends on person to person and how sensitive/comfortable you are eating out, heading out to accompany and eat with family, friends, and coworkers should be a option, even if we have to bring our own food as a compromise.

http://wydaily.com/2017/07/20/family-of-disabled-11-year-old-sues-colonial-williamsburg-for-discrimination-nws/

On a side note remember not every chain and store are the same, always talk to a manager, or call ahead before bringing in your own food, or eating out with special requirements, dietary restrictions, or extreme food allergies/intolerance.

The outcome wasn't good, but if the planning had gone on for that long they could've contacted the tavern in advance and either satisfied themselves about their standards or cleared the child to bring in a snack. Instead they've lawyered up and a great many people are going to go through a lot of stress which didn't really need to happen. 

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18 hours ago, Jmg said:

The outcome wasn't good, but if the planning had gone on for that long they could've contacted the tavern in advance and either satisfied themselves about their standards or cleared the child to bring in a snack. Instead they've lawyered up and a great many people are going to go through a lot of stress which didn't really need to happen. 

Sounded like it's against the law in that state to bring in outside food to any restaurant. A simple phone call to the tavern would have told them that. Prior planning is exactly what was needed here. We don't have the right to break laws, and outside of school and jail, (with the correct paperwork),  we don't have the right to have gluten-free food everywhere we go. I'm shaking my head at the parents and how they dropped the ball here. 

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18 hours ago, kareng said:

As for the ADA - that doesn't mean we have the "right" to eat out for fun.  It has provisions for what is reasonable for the business.  I think it applies better to circumstances where you have no choice but to eat the food - like a college dorm.

Exactly!

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I find it amusing I brought this up to point out that discrimination is not something that should happen to those of us with this disease and if handled well we can compromise by bringing our own food where allowed and calling and contacting places prior to going explaining and setting things up. In this way we do not end up feeling out of place and can try to live a more normal life with social interactions and gatherings if all is handled well. I am unsure if this goal was met or blown out of the water -_-.

18 hours ago, kareng said:

As for the ADA - that doesn't mean we have the "right" to eat out for fun.  It has provisions for what is reasonable for the business.  I think it applies better to circumstances where you have no choice but to eat the food - like a college dorm.

One point I think this applies also and has for me so far it seems, is theme parks. Places like Six Flags where your stuck in their grounds, and they can not guarantee food safety. I found that with my celiac diagnoses I can talk to them and be allowed to bring my own food into the park. This not only allows me to head out and eat but also saves me a ton of money >.< as expensive as gluten-free food is theme park food is like another 3x that. They just put a medical sticker on my cooler and I store it in a locker in the park and go back to it for snacks and food. Odd thing from years past.....I have a life time member ship to Six Flags, But I can not go unless someone else is with me for when I get anemic, or sick so I go once a year if even that (not gone this year or last year). My other option is to book a hotel near by or sleep in my car. (I get deathly tired at night and pass out around 9pm). There is also the lines -_- I have to buy a flash pass to skip the lines, or I have panic attacks being unable to move for hours waiting for a ride.

 

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7 minutes ago, Ennis_TX said:

I find it amusing I brought this up to point out that discrimination is not something that should happen to those of us with this disease and if handled well we can compromise by bringing our own food where allowed and calling and contacting places prior to going explaining and setting things up. In this way we do not end up feeling out of place and can try to live a more normal life with social interactions and gatherings if all is handled well. I am unsure if this goal was met or blown out of the water -_-.

One point I think this applies also and has for me so far it seems, is theme parks. Places like Six Flags where your stuck in their grounds, and they can not guarantee food safety. I found that with my celiac diagnoses I can talk to them and be allowed to bring my own food into the park. This not only allows me to head out and eat but also saves me a ton of money >.< as expensive as gluten-free food is theme park food is like another 3x that. They just put a medical sticker on my cooler and I store it in a locker in the park and go back to it for snacks and food. Odd thing from years past.....I have a life time member ship to Six Flags, But I can not go unless someone else is with me for when I get anemic, or sick so I go once a year if even that (not gone this year or last year). My other option is to book a hotel near by or sleep in my car. (I get deathly tired at night and pass out around 9pm). There is also the lines -_- I have to buy a flash pass to skip the lines, or I have panic attacks being unable to move for hours waiting for a ride.

 

I have been to amusement parks & stadiums that don't really have gluten-free except ice cream, chips, that sort of stuff.  And, when called or emailed in advance, I am given a note to bring my own food.& eat outside with my family.  But that is different than a restaurant that is not allowed to have outside food in.

From what I have seen, this family didn't handle the whole situation well.  If they had brought a small discrete lunch in, waited until the others had their food, then pull it out and not made a big fuss, they probably would have been fine.  I have also been told that this tavern does do a safe gluten-free meal.... 

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3 hours ago, kareng said:

I have been to amusement parks & stadiums that don't really have gluten-free except ice cream, chips, that sort of stuff.  And, when called or emailed in advance, I am given a note to bring my own food.& eat outside with my family.  But that is different than a restaurant that is not allowed to have outside food in.

From what I have seen, this family didn't handle the whole situation well.  If they had brought a small discrete lunch in, waited until the others had their food, then pull it out and not made a big fuss, they probably would have been fine.  I have also been told that this tavern does do a safe gluten-free meal.... 

Spot on. 

You know you're going in advance so in good time you write /phone (ideally write) and let the venue know. The manager can then let you know what the venue can provide and you can make a decision as to whether it's suitable for the child or not. If it's not, then you can negotiate on whether they can eat their own food, ie offer to pay for a meal to cover their costs. Most people will want to help as long as the request is reasonable. If no agreement can be reached and all food is considered unsafe, then the person organizing the trip cab make arrangements for the child to eat beforehand. Not ideal and perhaps a shame for the little boy, but not the end of the world either. 

Instead they show up on the day, force the hands of whatever presumably junior staff is on duty and are now using lawyers to get their own way and in the process antagonizing the business and probably the wider, non celiac community who see a small business being subjected to legal harassment by parents who didn't do their prep and lawyers who smell a cash cow.

 

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