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simplicity66

Table Salt Vs Kosher Or Sea Salt?

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my system seems to hold alot of water when i eat alot of salt and my thrist i cant seem to quench...being off alot of salt sources( was on a very blane diet for 9mths)...i am finding gluten-free recipes and products contain alot of salt....by making or trying to make my own products i am really not sure which salts would be better for my system so i dont hold alot of water....i hold so much my feet and hands swell and it hurts....my question is.....which salt should i be using all the time to avoid this uncomfortable feeling?????..seems that riceguy has gotten me on the right track which coconut milk and oil....which i thank him...his help and knowledge helped me alot.....

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I switched to sea salt (it has to be gray, or some off color or it's too refined) I really like it. It has about 1/4 of the amount of sodium and the flavor is more complex. I don't know how it would affect your swelling though.


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

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There's a whole bunch of different salts and chef's who collect them from all over the world. Each one adds a distinct flavor to food and if you want to watch your salt intake you should look at the sodium content. I find that kosher salt doesn't bother me as bad as regular fine table salt.

It would be good to wean yourself.


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I also had a lot of swelling in my feet and legs, and staying off the salt did help some. However, I now can use more salt without a problem (unless I really go overboard for a few days). It seems my malabsorption was at least part of the problem I had with salt. Plus I can also have more proteins, carbs, and fats with less of the problems I had from those. The improvement came with the use of a magnesium supplement (powdered). This one supplement has help me in so many ways I wish I'd started taking it a looong time ago. Things like muscle/nerve pain, sleep cycles, digestion, mood, alertness, and more.

It was posts on this forum which lead me to try it. For that I am eternally grateful.

BTW, I like the sun-dried sea salt over that stuff referred to as "ordinary table salt". I'm sure there are a number of fine brands to select from, and as Jestgar stated, the good ones aren't so white.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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...... The improvement came with the use of a magnesium supplement (powdered).....

Hey Mr. RiceGuy,

I don't want to hijack s66's salt post, but your magnesium suggestion led me to:

http://dietary-supplements.info.nih.gov/fa...s/magnesium.asp

One thing that concerns me is that the Recommended Dietary Magnesium Allowance for an adult male is 420 mg/day, yet the Tolerable Upper Intake Levels for supplemental magnesium is only 350 mg/day. That indicates a very narrow dosing window.

The other thing that appears highly important is type of product. According to this Dept. of Health info, there are seven different forms of magnesium suppliments, with each form offering varying amounts of elemental magnesium.

"The amount of elemental magnesium in a compound and its bioavailability influence the effectiveness of the magnesium supplement".

I just started taking three tablets of magnesium oxide equaling 1200 mg a day. At 60% elemental magnesium availability (potentially), I'm over the recommended amount. Of course, that's assuming a lot. There's no easy way to determine how much we're getting from our diet, or from the supplements.

The report also mentions enteric tablet coating, but not powdered (I think).

best regards, lm


gluten-free 12-18-06

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Guest AutumnE

I use kosher sea salt, it does have less iodine but I have a corn intolerance and they use corn to add the iodine. If your problem is a corn intolerance it could cause bloating or swelling.

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I switched to sea salt (it has to be gray, or some off color or it's too refined) I really like it. It has about 1/4 of the amount of sodium and the flavor is more complex. I don't know how it would affect your swelling though.

Perhaps 1/4 less sodium..(more Mg++, Ca++ and K+). but certainly not 1/4 of the sodium..

taste/texture wise its nicer for me but health wise it lacks Iodine ..and contains appreciable sulfates (sulphates)..

I can expand for others if anyone wants... can't believe I need to for Jestgar...


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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One thing that concerns me is that the Recommended Dietary Magnesium Allowance for an adult male is 420 mg/day, yet the Tolerable Upper Intake Levels for supplemental magnesium is only 350 mg/day. That indicates a very narrow dosing window.

The other thing that appears highly important is type of product....

I just started taking three tablets of magnesium oxide equaling 1200 mg a day. At 60% elemental magnesium availability (potentially), I'm over the recommended amount. Of course, that's assuming a lot. There's no easy way to determine how much we're getting from our diet, or from the supplements.

I did read some stuff about this, and it is my understanding that the oxide form offers a comparatively low absorption potential. The chelate forms are apparently the ones to use, one of which is citrate (the form in the powder I currently use). I am thinking of trying the carbonate form, just to compare taste/effectiveness.

As for the dosage, I wouldn't be too concerned about it. If you take too much, you'll likely know by your BM. I currently take twice the daily dosage, and have only positive experience with it. I've seen posts from other members stating much higher intake levels, but since the form of it matters with regard to potency/potential, I suppose some may simply be using a less effective form. It doesn't appear to be so critical as to pose any harm if the intake exceeds the recommended dosage. Plus for individuals who have malabsorption, perhaps the limit of concern is that of the digestive system itself.

The way I think of it, if you start "seeing green" when you eat spinach or other dark green veggies, then the digestive system isn't breaking down the chlorophylle. Since magnesium is part of every chlorophylle molecule, then it seems to me that's an indication of poor digestion. Hence, such an individual would quite likely have a magnesium deficiency, no?


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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Perhaps 1/4 less sodium..(more Mg++, Ca++ and K+). but certainly not 1/4 of the sodium..

Actual content depends on which sea it was from. But table salt is only NaCl, and how could that be good for you?


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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Table salt in Canada and the US is almost universally iodized, which means that in addition to the sodium chloride (NaCl) which comprises the vast majority of the content, there is a small amount of sodium iodide (NaI) present.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

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Actual content depends on which sea it was from. But table salt is only NaCl, and how could that be good for you?

Well firstly almopst noone has long term salt deficiency... or low Na... so less salt is proably better for almost everyone BUT ocean salt is actually fairly constant in proportions and even ppt of total salts doesn't vary enormously.(outside the ploar regions and persian gulf which is almost a sea within a sea... if ultimately connected to the oceans. local variations occur due to high runoff .. for instance the amazon has a very low concentration but its still not huge.... other things that make a difference are local geology, for instance areas with a high orthoclase (KAlSi3O8) content (found in many granites) will have slightly higher K than a plagioclase area Na|Ca solid solution series with the same cat-ion... (Si2O6) (two less O2's because of the valency of Na and Ca.. and similarly sediment derived from these... But its really small... We (geologists) use these are paleo-markers etc. I could look up the numbers but ...??

Anyway... most table salt is from the Zechstein (late Permian) which is before we started wholescale dumping of toxic metals into the sea... along with trans-uranics... however I don't worry about that :D

The reason I corrected you was ytou wrote 25% of which people who are not scientists could take to mean they can have 4x as much!

Ultimately all salt is sea salt .... Ok there are lake deposts too (indeed the Russians made the Aral sea into a huge saltpan by accident...) but it all undergoes the same process as sea salt... evaporation exceeds influx ... and almost all salt deposits are mixed and layered... in the same order...Ive seen some really weird salt's .. one almost pure SrCl I drilled through... I spotted it on a log run and we had to dump the mud from the radioactivity... (ahem creating our own mini dustbowl in the Sahara) killed off everything in site... I had sand bulldozed over it later... (lots of that in the sahara) .. anyway... just didn't want people thinking they can have 4x as much sea salt :D


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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Oh yeah, I forgot that you were that rock guy :rolleyes:

There's an interesting bit on low sodium salt taken from (near Finland? Sweden?) and the Great Salt Lake has a huge Morton salt plant on it.

In the same vein of salt talk, I once went to a lecture wherein the lecturer explained that 4-6 warriors could consume several days worth of salt from one cannibalized victim. It was an interesting perspective on warfare.


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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