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larry mac

Wheat Flour Sourdough Starters

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Just discovered a variety of fresh sourdough starters very reasonably priced ($7-$10 w/ free shipping).

If starting with a volume of one ounce, immediately adding one cup gluten-free flour & one cup water/milk, then replacing one cup every few days, how long till completely wheat free (ie. safe for celiacs)?

best regards, lm

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http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/detail...C89&id=1522

http://www.sourdoughbreads.com/Sourdough_Starter.htm

p.s., There are even more dried starters available, but I'm thinking they would also need to be "diluted" numerous times.


gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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I don't have anything useful to add, but I can't wait to hear how this turns out. I love(d) sourdough bread.

Nancy


The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person who is doing it.

~Chinese Proverb

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Just discovered a variety of fresh sourdough starters very reasonably priced ($7-$10 w/ free shipping).

If starting with a volume of one ounce, immediately adding one cup gluten-free flour & one cup water/milk, then replacing one cup every few days, how long till completely wheat free (ie. safe for celiacs)?

best regards, lm

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/detail...C89&id=1522

http://www.sourdoughbreads.com/Sourdough_Starter.htm

p.s., There are even more dried starters available, but I'm thinking they would also need to be "diluted" numerous times.

I believe never would be the appropriate response here. I wouldn't chance it myself.

There are companies that make gluten free starters or perhaps you can find a recipe for one.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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I used to have a sourdough started that only had water, sugar, yeast and potato flakes in it. It was very delicious. I wonder if it would work gluten-free. Although, it isn't the "traditional" sourdough taste like you'd buy at a bakery. Hmm....


Mom of:

Carleigh~ 10 years old, allergic to wheat, milk, peanuts, strawberries, and many EAs. She is currently soy-light and egg-light ~ celiac testing inconclusive by allergist.

Gluten-Free since 10/05 She's a gymnast. : )

Nick ~ 13 years old with no known allergies.

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Could you get the same effect ( taste wise ) using Buttermilk or slightly soured milk?


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming WOW-- What a Ride!

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Could you get the same effect ( taste wise ) using Buttermilk or slightly soured milk?

Hey grump 1,

I actually do sometimes use buttermilk for cooking. But no, it's not the same as a good sourdough. I take it your not a sourdough bread lover. I go way back. Before the time when you could get a loaf of California Sourdough in just about any grocery store. Used to be you had to go out of your way to get it, if you could get it at all. They ship it in frozen now. All they really do in the store is thaw it out and put it out. It's damn good though.

A sourdough bread lover can easily tell (by just a quick whiff) if it's a genuine sourdough or just a local grocery store bakery bread containing an "additive" (a product to mimic the sourdough taste). Though sometimes quite tasty, there's simply no comparisan. Another fast tipoff is the crust. Oh God, the crust. You can easily chip a tooth on the real thing. And I have (broken off a crown).

Yes, sometimes I've had hot, crusty bread and the best butter for a meal. No wonder I turned out to be a Celiac. Now, if only I could make gluten-free bread that looks like the cover of Bette Hagmans bread book (what a rip-off). I challenge anyone to come up with something resembling anything on the cover of "The Gluten-Free Gourmet Bakes Bread".

best regards, lm

p.s., I'm not bitter, I'm sour!

p.s.s., Ha Ha lol yeah yeah.


gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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To answer the original question, every dilution you do would still leave behind some wheat flour. You could dilute it so many times that the statistical chances of having any wheat molecules left behind would be practically zero, but how low is low enough for you to safely eat it, and how many dilutions must you do to get there? I wouldn't feel safe using it. True sourdough starter is just wild yeast picked up from the air that come to live in the flour/water/sugar you leave out on the counter. You can also do this with rice flour or potato water and either start with a package of dry yeast, or simply wait for it to ferment from the captured wild yeast. San Francisco sourdough tastes the way it does because the wild yeast in that area are different from the wild yeast in New Jersey, so your starter will have its own flavor. Here's the instructions from Bette Hagman:

"In a 1- or 1-1/2 quart glass or pottery crock, dissolve the yeast (1 packet or 2-1/4t) in the water (1c lukewarm water or potato water). Add the sugar (pinch) and rice flour (1 and 1/2c white rice flour). Let the jar sit out until fermented (1 to 3 days), stirring every few hours. This will bubble up and ferment and then die down with a skim of liquid on the top. Be sure to stir well before using. The consistency should be about that of pancake batter."

Refeed it with water and rice flour whenever you take some, or occasionally throw some away and feed the rest if you haven't used it in a while. Gotta feed the yeast or it will die.


Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

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