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ptkds

gluten-free Pancakes At Ihop!

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My mom went to IHOP yesterday w/ her dh and my brother. She said they had "corn cake pancakes" and they were gluten free! She said they tasted pretty good, too. So I called IHOP to see if this were true, and of course they wouldn't confirm. They told me to talk to the manager at the IHOP I go to. So, if you have an IHOP near you, call em up! They may have gluten-free pancakes there!!

ptkds

PS, the IHOP she went to was somewhere in the Beumont/houston area.

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My mom went to IHOP yesterday w/ her dh and my brother. She said they had "corn cake pancakes" and they were gluten free! She said they tasted pretty good, too. So I called IHOP to see if this were true, and of course they wouldn't confirm. They told me to talk to the manager at the IHOP I go to. So, if you have an IHOP near you, call em up! They may have gluten-free pancakes there!!

ptkds

PS, the IHOP she went to was somewhere in the Beumont/houston area.

I would be VERY careful with how trusting you are of IHOP...Even if they do have gluten free corn cake pancakes, will they clean the grill after each time?? The risk for CC in a place like that shoots through the roof...plus...IHOP has been known to put pancake batter in their omletes to make them fluffier...it would be wonderful if more mainstream places were going to start offering these options but be careful! did your mom get sick? now that its a few days later?

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Wow!!! Sounds nice, I would love to have pancakes when I go out. Even though I don't have an IHOP around me, there are several near the shore where we vacation in NJ.

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did your mom get sick? now that its a few days later?

My mom was very specific about asking the waitress to make sure they cook the pancakes in a clean pan, and she asked that they not use any pancake batter in the omelotte. She didn't get sick at all. I just talked to her, and she is fine. I have been to Dennys a few times without a problem. I get the meat lover's omelotte, and it is yummy. Just don't get the hot dogs for kids, cuz they come prepackaged with the bread I think. My dd's got glutened when ordered them hot dogs w/out the bread.

ptkds

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...The risk for CC in a place like that shoots through the roof...plus...IHOP has been known to put pancake batter in their omletes to make them fluffier...

That is true but that makes it sound like they do that in some underhanded way. It is right on the menu that their omlettes have pancake batter.

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It has been a few years since I've eaten at an IHOP and when I did, it definetely wasn't on the menu that pancake batter was in their omletes...if it was, I certainly didn't see it.....on the menu or not, it's still weird that they do that... :blink:

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IHOP does use pancake batter in their omlettes to "make them fluffier".

I just ate there the other day and it says it right on the menu (under the omlette section).

I emailed IHOP corporate about the corn cake batter - I have my doubts - not to discount anyone, but I have little faith that any chain restaurant has advanced to being able to offer gluten-free pancakes...

I sure hope I'm wrong though...

:)

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I just looked on their website and it does list the corn cakes as a new item on the menu. I think I'd rather just have my pancakes at home with Authentic Foods mix though. I'm not sure I'd feel safe eating at IHOP.

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I'm glad to see some restaurants are at least trying to create gluten-free dishes :) . I would still worry about cc though.

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IHOP's Response :angry:

"Dear Mr. Broncobux:

I do understand your concern regarding the importance of obtaining accurate information on our products, for dietary purposes or restrictions. Unfortunately, IHOP is unable to provide detailed information on our menu items.

IHOP values the health of our guests and recognizes the need to provide information to our guests. However, food preparation practices, menu offerings and product suppliers vary from region to region. With that natural variance in food across the country, it is nearly impossible to calculate and publish accurate nutritional information or ingredient content on all of our menu items.

Thank you for bringing your concerns to my attention. We hope to serve you again soon.

Sincerely,

Don Miller

Guest Services Representative

IHOP Restaurant Support Center"

-- I asked if the corn cake pancakes contained gluten... what a worthless response.

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My response:

Mr. Miller,

While I appreciate your quick response, I consider the content to be of little or no value.

Apparently, IHOP is not in the business of being honest and upfront about their products. As a loyal customer with food allergies, I would have hoped for a simple yes or no answer to my earlier query. I think its pathetic that IHOP believes that "it is nearly impossible to calculate and publish accurate nutritional information or ingredient content on all of our menu items. Perhaps you are unaware of other restaurants that are able (shockingly) to produce gluten free menus at their restaurants regardless of region or food preparation practices. When you have a chance, take a look at Outback Steakhouse, Carrabbas, PF Chang's, Pei Wei, Flemings Steakhouse, McDonalds, Wendy's, First Watch, Chipotle, Jack in the Box's (and many more) websites as they all are able to produce either gluten free menus or are able to be honest with their customers about ingredients in their products.

This is a disappointing day for me. I have been a loyal customer of IHOP for many years (even if I only came in to eat eggs and sausage). Yesterday, I asked a simple question. Today, I received a politician's response. I expect better from IHOP.

FYI, I have copied and pasted your response to www.glutenfreeforum.com (a national website for celiac disease and those who abide by a gluten free diet), my local yahoo food allergen list serv in Las Vegas and all MySpace groups related to celiac disease and gluten intolerance.

I sincerely hope IHOP decides to join the afore-mentioned chain restaurants in 2007 and voluntarily disclose the ingredients in their products. Until then, I will encourage all of my friends to take their business elsewhere.

Sincerely,

Broncobux

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My response:

Mr. Miller,

While I appreciate your quick response, I consider the content to be of little or no value.

Apparently, IHOP is not in the business of being honest and upfront about their products. As a loyal customer with food allergies, I would have hoped for a simple yes or no answer to my earlier query. I think its pathetic that IHOP believes that "it is nearly impossible to calculate and publish accurate nutritional information or ingredient content on all of our menu items. Perhaps you are unaware of other restaurants that are able (shockingly) to produce gluten free menus at their restaurants regardless of region or food preparation practices. When you have a chance, take a look at Outback Steakhouse, Carrabbas, PF Chang's, Pei Wei, Flemings Steakhouse, McDonalds, Wendy's, First Watch, Chipotle, Jack in the Box's (and many more) websites as they all are able to produce either gluten free menus or are able to be honest with their customers about ingredients in their products.

This is a disappointing day for me. I have been a loyal customer of IHOP for many years (even if I only came in to eat eggs and sausage). Yesterday, I asked a simple question. Today, I received a politician's response. I expect better from IHOP.

FYI, I have copied and pasted your response to www.glutenfreeforum.com (a national website for celiac disease and those who abide by a gluten free diet), my local yahoo food allergen list serv in Las Vegas and all MySpace groups related to celiac disease and gluten intolerance.

I sincerely hope IHOP decides to join the afore-mentioned chain restaurants in 2007 and voluntarily disclose the ingredients in their products. Until then, I will encourage all of my friends to take their business elsewhere.

Sincerely,

Broncobux

Nice Job!!!!! I mean fine, that you don't have a gluten free menu (although you would think in a place that makes scrambled eggs how hard could it be); but to not even disclose your ingredients. That just seems ridiculous. Like you said, you asked a simple question. "Do the corn cakes contain gluten." Sounds like a yes or no question to me.

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WOW...Way to go Chris!!!

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My mom was very specific about asking the waitress to make sure they cook the pancakes in a clean pan, and she asked that they not use any pancake batter in the omelotte. She didn't get sick at all. I just talked to her, and she is fine. I have been to Dennys a few times without a problem. I get the meat lover's omelotte, and it is yummy. Just don't get the hot dogs for kids, cuz they come prepackaged with the bread I think. My dd's got glutened when ordered them hot dogs w/out the bread.

ptkds

Denny's has a gluten free menu. Or at least they will bring out a list of stuff and go over it with you so you know just what is in every thing. Or at lest the one up north in Bellingham, Wa. did when we were up there. Have not tried it down here yet. That might be some thing you might want to check out also.

Grump

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My response:

Mr. Miller,

While I appreciate your quick response, I consider the content to be of little or no value.

Apparently, IHOP is not in the business of being honest and upfront about their products. As a loyal customer with food allergies, I would have hoped for a simple yes or no answer to my earlier query. I think its pathetic that IHOP believes that "it is nearly impossible to calculate and publish accurate nutritional information or ingredient content on all of our menu items. Perhaps you are unaware of other restaurants that are able (shockingly) to produce gluten free menus at their restaurants regardless of region or food preparation practices. When you have a chance, take a look at Outback Steakhouse, Carrabbas, PF Chang's, Pei Wei, Flemings Steakhouse, McDonalds, Wendy's, First Watch, Chipotle, Jack in the Box's (and many more) websites as they all are able to produce either gluten free menus or are able to be honest with their customers about ingredients in their products.

This is a disappointing day for me. I have been a loyal customer of IHOP for many years (even if I only came in to eat eggs and sausage). Yesterday, I asked a simple question. Today, I received a politician's response. I expect better from IHOP.

FYI, I have copied and pasted your response to www.glutenfreeforum.com (a national website for celiac disease and those who abide by a gluten free diet), my local yahoo food allergen list serv in Las Vegas and all MySpace groups related to celiac disease and gluten intolerance.

I sincerely hope IHOP decides to join the afore-mentioned chain restaurants in 2007 and voluntarily disclose the ingredients in their products. Until then, I will encourage all of my friends to take their business elsewhere.

Sincerely,

Broncobux

What a well-written letter. You speak for the gluten-free masses!

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It is true about IHOP putting pancake batter in their omelets AND this fact IS NOT anywhere on their menus. You must ask for your omelet to be without batter.

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Winki,

In Vegas, they pancake batter disclaimer is located in the menus. Its in tiny print right beneath the omelettes section.

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Disclaimer: I've only looked for the batter description since my own diagnosis about 10 months ago and only at IHOP restaurants in Virginia. All have had the statement about batter in the omlette in the same size text where they describe their omlettes (number of eggs, side dishes, etc.).

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My mom went to IHOP yesterday w/ her dh and my brother. She said they had "corn cake pancakes" and they were gluten free! She said they tasted pretty good, too. So I called IHOP to see if this were true, and of course they wouldn't confirm. They told me to talk to the manager at the IHOP I go to. So, if you have an IHOP near you, call em up! They may have gluten-free pancakes there!!

ptkds

PS, the IHOP she went to was somewhere in the Beumont/houston area.

Sounds great, thanks for the info. FYI IHOP puts pancake batter in their eggs. Who would have thought. Be careful when ordering eggs.

Kerri

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It is true about IHOP putting pancake batter in their omelets AND this fact IS NOT anywhere on their menus. You must ask for your omelet to be without batter.

The menu VERY clearly says that there is pancake batter in the omelets. It's there right under the word "Omelets."

richard

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Just want to interject this as it seems on topic. Be very carefull about scrambled eggs at buffets or anywhere else for that matter. I've been served scrambled eggs which were in large aluminum pan and under eggs in this pan were flattened tortillas (wheat) to absorb run off fluid from eggs.

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When we were vacationing in Orlando we stayed right next to an IHOP and went there often. They claimed that this particular location did NOT put pancake batter in the omlette (although it was in good size font right on the menu) but to be safe, they would crack three eggs and make me an omlette from them. I was fine and it tasted great! They were very accomodating.

The menu VERY clearly says that there is pancake batter in the omelets. It's there right under the word "Omelets."

richard

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It has been a few years since I've eaten at an IHOP and when I did, it definetely wasn't on the menu that pancake batter was in their omletes...if it was, I certainly didn't see it.....on the menu or not, it's still weird that they do that... :blink:

They didn't used to list it, the waiter that told me said it was a "trade secret". But this was when I was first diagnosed. I've left them alone since then.

I think the McDonalds french fries lawsuit may have gotten their attention about keeping secrets where food contents are concerned.

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Yes, I believe its a more recent addition to their menu as well, during my diagnosis about 4-5 years ago, I was in college in southern virginia and got sick and it was not on the menu. I'm glad that it is now! I didn't know about the flour tortilla thing, that is very helpful, thank you!

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