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KimmyJ

What Are The Tests I Should Ask For?

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I had positive blood work for Celiac and a positive skin biopsy for DH back in Oct. Unfortunately, I didn't get any follow-up care because I was out of country, and I suppose because the doctor didn't really know much about Celiac. Anyhow, I am finally back home and I want to find a doctor who is a little more knowlegeable about Celiac, or at least willing to learn, and in order t be prepared, I want to go in knowing what to ask for as far as tests are concerned. Can someone please list for me the usual tests that are conducted for Celiac patients? Thanks!

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

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Egads I wish I knew who to credit for this quote/info, but I just copied it over from another thread a couple days ago.

He or she wrote, in response to a similar inquiry:

"You should have a bone density scan done and also get checked for anemia if you haven't already. It would be helpful if your doctor would check your folate, B12 and calcium levels also."

Good luck! :)


>>>>>>> tom <<<<<<<

Celiac 1st diagnosed as a toddler, in the 60s. Docs then, between bloodletting & leech-tending, said "he'll grow out of it" & I was back on gluten & mostly fine for 30yrs.

Gluten-free since 12-03

Dairy-free since 10-04

Soy-free since 5-07

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Since your tests produced a diagnosis for Celiac you will want to check to see if you vitamin and mineral levels. It used to be called an Executive Panel or full Metabolic Panel.

I have found that every new doctor that I have been to, wants to run their own test to verify what a previous doctor told you. What a waste of money. There is no need for diagnostic testing for Celiac.


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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Have you gone gluten free yet? If so, are you still having symptoms.

You should get your antibody and vitamin levels and checked.

Also you might need to have an endoscopy, but you will need to be eating gluten to get this done.

Gastroenterologists are usually the best doctors to see about celiacs as they are usually the ones to diagnose it. Ask your regular doctor for the name of a good gastroenterologist who specializes in celiacs.

Good luck.


Australian

Gluten Free Since mid March 2008

As well as gluten I can't eat: cantaloupe, honeydew, dairy and most nuts and seeds. I also seem to have a problem with a lot of fruits and vegetables but only when they are raw.

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I have been gluten-free ever since my diagnosis back in mid-October. I have absolutely no intention of going back to eating gluten just so some doctor can get a biopsy. Not at all worth it. I do still have some symptoms, but only when I accidentally get glutened. Thanks for the help everyone!

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from: http://www.celiacdiseasecenter.columbia.ed...nts/A02-FAQ.htm

Q: What follow-up care should I have after diagnosis?

Patients need follow-up after diagnosis. Symptoms that persist after commencing the diet require elucidation and appropriate treatment. Bone density should be measured because osteopenia and osteoporosis are common complications of celiac disease. Iron, folic acid, calcium and certain vitamins should be measured as there is often malabsorption of these nutrients. Certain vitamins and minerals may need to be administered, but the patient should be under a physician's guidance as to how much should be taken and for how long. Consultation with a dietitian experienced with the gluten-free diet is recommended. Many patients, especially the elderly, require a Pneumovax vaccination because hyposplenism and a resultant increased risk of pneumococcal infection is common.

Blood tests are used to monitor adherence to the gluten-free diet, as antibody levels should normalize with time. Patients with celiac disease should have at least one follow-up biopsy to confirm their response to the diet and the normalization of the biopsy sample. Patients who are non-responders, or whose clinical situation is somewhat confusing, may need more repeated biopsies at intervals

Patients who have persistent diarrhea after starting a gluten-free diet require a more intensive evaluation to exclude other food intolerances, colitis, bacterial overgrowth or pancreatic insufficiency. All these can be adequately treated if correctly diagnosed.

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