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huevo_no_bueno

Egg Allergy Thread

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Hi,

I'm hoping to start an egg allergy thread here. I'm allergic to eggs. The whites. The yolks. Even duck eggs gave me a reaction.

I keep inadvertently bumping into things I react to in restaurants. I try to be cautious but eggs are everywhere. It almost seems more difficult to avoid than gluten. Eggs are in so many gluten-free products.

I regularly get bummed out about this, if I let myself think about it for very long. I don't miss gluten one bit, but I do miss eating things made with eggs, and I hate the feeling of an allergic reaction.

Hope to learn and share info here! :)


Positive IgA-gluten in 2004

Positive IgG-gluten in 2008

Gluten intolerance

Egg allergy

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I'm also allergic to eggs, but only the whites. If I eat eggs or something with eggs in the top ingredients, I get a similar reaction I get to gluten, only the egg rxn is quicker coming and going. My egg rxn last a few hours at most, gluten lasts for a few days...I get a really bad stomachache, a headache, nausea, everything. It lasts a few hours then goes away. I tried a gluten-free bread from Trader Joe's that I couldn't tolerate. I ate half of the roll and got sick. You're right, it is really hard to avoid eggs. I haven't really tried many gluten free breads for that very reason; most have massive amounts of eggs/egg whites. Ain't life grand!

But I still say, at least I know what is wrong with me and I can control it with food, as difficult as that at times may be.


Be yourself, everyone else is taken.

Oscar Wilde

Gluten free November 2007

IgA Deficient, Neg Bloodwork, Double DQ2 Positive

Dietary and Genetic Diagnosis June 2, 2008

Soy free Jan 09

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My standard meal for eating out is a "big salad" with plenty of good cheese and some meat. Lately, however, I seem to be having the egg reaction to this, even if I use plain oil & vinegar. I don't know if it is cross-contamination from the surface on which the protein is grilled or tongs from a neighboring Ceasar salad. I don't know. I react sometimes to high levels of sulfites, like many people do, but this is happening at places where you don't expect a lot of that.


Positive IgA-gluten in 2004

Positive IgG-gluten in 2008

Gluten intolerance

Egg allergy

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My standard meal for eating out is a "big salad" with plenty of good cheese and some meat. Lately, however, I seem to be having the egg reaction to this, even if I use plain oil & vinegar. I don't know if it is cross-contamination from the surface on which the protein is grilled or tongs from a neighboring Ceasar salad. I don't know. I react sometimes to high levels of sulfites, like many people do, but this is happening at places where you don't expect a lot of that.

big salad... LOL :lol:

I have gotten sick from a few salads too. Not always sure why either. Eating out is a big old pain.


Be yourself, everyone else is taken.

Oscar Wilde

Gluten free November 2007

IgA Deficient, Neg Bloodwork, Double DQ2 Positive

Dietary and Genetic Diagnosis June 2, 2008

Soy free Jan 09

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My standard meal for eating out is a "big salad" with plenty of good cheese and some meat. Lately, however, I seem to be having the egg reaction to this, even if I use plain oil & vinegar. I don't know if it is cross-contamination from the surface on which the protein is grilled or tongs from a neighboring Ceasar salad. I don't know. I react sometimes to high levels of sulfites, like many people do, but this is happening at places where you don't expect a lot of that.

You might beware of that chicken. I've seen a lot of it that contains milk, wheat, and or soy. We do have additional allergies to watch out for. My daughter can only have chicken if it is plain chicken that they cook from scratch. The frozen stuff always has additives, it seems.

My mom is allergic to chicken and my daughter shows some number on the RAST. I can't remember what, but it's not enough to be an allergy.

It could be that you've developed a chicken allergy as well, since chicken and eggs are related.

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big salad... LOL :lol:

I have gotten sick from a few salads too. Not always sure why either. Eating out is a big old pain.

I know the feeling. My favorite meal used to be a big salad, but due to my gastroparesis, that just doesn't work any more.

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I've considered the chicken allergy, but when I've made chicken at home recently I feel fine.

After that one salad I've had the old D for the past 24 hours, and without getting way into it here, I think it was something on the chicken or hiding in the lettuce. I'm now thinking I was glutened too, but I definitely had the egg reaction. No fun!!

If every restaurant just used fresh ingredients without any pre-mixes and fillers, and could really tell you "what's in the burger," it would be a whole lot easier.

Do any of you who have answered on this thread bake at home or have any favorite "treats" that are safe, gluten free and egg free?


Positive IgA-gluten in 2004

Positive IgG-gluten in 2008

Gluten intolerance

Egg allergy

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I've considered the chicken allergy, but when I've made chicken at home recently I feel fine.

After that one salad I've had the old D for the past 24 hours, and without getting way into it here, I think it was something on the chicken or hiding in the lettuce. I'm now thinking I was glutened too, but I definitely had the egg reaction. No fun!!

If every restaurant just used fresh ingredients without any pre-mixes and fillers, and could really tell you "what's in the burger," it would be a whole lot easier.

Do any of you who have answered on this thread bake at home or have any favorite "treats" that are safe, gluten free and egg free?

I bake very little. Not much seems to come out well when you have to leave the egg out. I do make the zucchini bread (recipe on this site) and use ground flax instead of egg. That does come out really well. Luckily we have the Flying Apron bakery here so I can get cupcakes and pastries for my daughter that are really good.

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Sorry, I am not a baker. About the only thing I "bake" is the pizza crust from Namaste.

For cookies or the occasional treat, check out the Enjoy Life brand. They are made in a bakery that is dedicated to be free of the big 8 allergens. I've had their chocolate and snickerdoodle cookies. They are not exactly a chocolate cookie from a bakery, but I found them to exceed my expectations.


Be yourself, everyone else is taken.

Oscar Wilde

Gluten free November 2007

IgA Deficient, Neg Bloodwork, Double DQ2 Positive

Dietary and Genetic Diagnosis June 2, 2008

Soy free Jan 09

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I am following the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, well, I am a Metabolic Protein type so its the SCD with more protein basically. When my digestion collapsed back in January eggs were a big no-no, but now after eating the plain food my stomach seems to be healing and I can now tolerate some eggs and products with egg in.

One recipe I love from the SCD without eggs is savory crackers.

These crackers are mighty tasty - especially if you're generous with the seasonings. The originator used Trader Joe's Roasted Garlic and Organic Italian Herbs to create a great flavor, but we don't have that in the UK so I use Herbamare which is a herbal condiment powder.

2 cups fine almond meal

Half teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon- or so- minced roasted garlic, to taste (optional)

2-3 teaspoons- or so- dried Italian Herbs, to taste

Pinch or two of turmeric for colour (optional)

Good pinch of fine sea salt

1 cup very finely grated aged Cheddar or Parmesan - if tolerated

2 tablespoons olive oil

4 tablespoons spring or filtered water, as needed

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a standard baking sheet with parchment paper.

Combine the ingredients in a mixing bowl and stir until a moist, moderately sticky dough forms. Add more water or oil if you need it. Taste test. Adjust seasonings to your taste buds.

Using wet hands place the mound of dough on the parchment and flatten with the palm of your hand. Use moist fingers to press the dough out evenly. I made mine about 1/8 " thick. If it cracks, simply press back together with moist fingers. Cut into squares before cooking.

Bake in the centre of a hot oven for 15 minutes or until the dough is set, dry and golden.

Remove and cool on a wire rack.

The crackers will be extremely tender while they are warm. Be careful.

Store in an airtight container.

This makes about 16 to 18 crackers. I might suggest re-baking the cut crackers for maybe 7 minutes to make a crisper cracker. This double-bake method works well with biscotti. Why not a cracker?

My addendum

(I replaced some of the parmesan with cornmeal in the ones I made the other day – 2 spoonfuls of parmesan and the rest cornmeal – and cooked them for 20 – 25 minutes which made them perfectly crisp. I also left out the garlic and didn’t bother with the turmeric as the cornmeal added yellow color to them. They are nice on their own or spread with butter if tolerated. Yum.

I have also made them without parmesan and they were very good although the cheese helps to bind them together so they were a little crumblier. The first time, I was still reacting to some cheeses and I used ready-grated parmesan, not realising that it can have wheat flour added to it to keep the cheese separated. I have now bought some fresh parmesan although I have not tried them with it yet. I did have some goats cheese last night and was ok with that so hopefully the parmesan will be ok.


Ali - 50 - struggled with what I now know to be GI symptoms and poor carb digestion for at least 35 years! Diabetic type II (1997). Mother undx Celiac - lifelong diabetic Type 1 & anemic (plus 1 stillborn and 10 miscarriages after me). Father definitely very GI.

Stopped gluten & dairy, Jan 08, but still other issues so dropped most carbs and sugar and have been following the Specific Carb Diet (SCD) since March 08. Recovery slow but steady and I can now eat a much broader range of foods especially raw which are good for my digestion and boost my energy level.

Not getting better? Try the SCD - it might just change your life.........

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I am following the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, well, I am a Metabolic Protein type so its the SCD with more protein basically. When my digestion collapsed back in January eggs were a big no-no, but now after eating the plain food my stomach seems to be healing and I can now tolerate some eggs and products with egg in.

One recipe I love from the SCD without eggs is savory crackers.

These crackers are mighty tasty - especially if you're generous with the seasonings. The originator used Trader Joe's Roasted Garlic and Organic Italian Herbs to create a great flavor, but we don't have that in the UK so I use Herbamare which is a herbal condiment powder.

2 cups fine almond meal

Half teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon- or so- minced roasted garlic, to taste (optional)

2-3 teaspoons- or so- dried Italian Herbs, to taste

Pinch or two of turmeric for colour (optional)

Good pinch of fine sea salt

1 cup very finely grated aged Cheddar or Parmesan - if tolerated

2 tablespoons olive oil

4 tablespoons spring or filtered water, as needed

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a standard baking sheet with parchment paper.

Combine the ingredients in a mixing bowl and stir until a moist, moderately sticky dough forms. Add more water or oil if you need it. Taste test. Adjust seasonings to your taste buds.

Using wet hands place the mound of dough on the parchment and flatten with the palm of your hand. Use moist fingers to press the dough out evenly. I made mine about 1/8 " thick. If it cracks, simply press back together with moist fingers. Cut into squares before cooking.

Bake in the centre of a hot oven for 15 minutes or until the dough is set, dry and golden.

Remove and cool on a wire rack.

The crackers will be extremely tender while they are warm. Be careful.

Store in an airtight container.

This makes about 16 to 18 crackers. I might suggest re-baking the cut crackers for maybe 7 minutes to make a crisper cracker. This double-bake method works well with biscotti. Why not a cracker?

My addendum

(I replaced some of the parmesan with cornmeal in the ones I made the other day


Positive IgA-gluten in 2004

Positive IgG-gluten in 2008

Gluten intolerance

Egg allergy

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