Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

HeatherMelissa

Cross Contamination

Recommended Posts


Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Sure--it could be. Somebody posted an article here that something like 15% of all foods labeled gluten-free contain trace amounts of gluten--or some figure like that. It's quite scary, actually. The companies, though, cannot simply write gluten-free on a package of spelt bread, though.

Then, of course, companies such as Lays could have contaminated products. Some of their products claim to be gluten-free--this is slightly different, I guess, though, because they don't actually label the packages as being gluten-free....it can definintely happen, though. That's why if something bothers you every time you try it, just cut it out of your diet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lays recently told me that a brand of their chips was gluten-free so I went ahead and ate some. I had a horrible reaction to it and I went to double check the label and right on it it said barley malt....This was my fault for not double checking though.

As for the cross contamination...wow 15% ...that astounds me...I knew there was alot but that is very scary.

There are many things...especially risky is fast food places...that say their stuff is gluten-free but are handled along with other foods that are not....very high risk for contamination there.

If something says gluten-free but your body reacts to it....as celiac3270 said...just cut it from your diet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes--I actually think the number was higher, but I wanted to play it safe, so I lowered my estimate a bit--I can't remember where I saw that, though!

Which chips did you try that had barley malt?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?showtopic=942

Yes! Here we go--after a bit of searching. The article was from WebMD, posted by gf4life (Mariann). Anyway, the figure is actually 20% -- I would've guessed 25%, which is slightly high, but anyway, I found the actual #, yay! Anyway, this probably helps to answer your question. Definitely read the article--fascinating that it could be that high. This makes you wonder if maybe you're being contaminated, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow that # is even worse! I had STAX BBQ chips. I noticed on the side of the box the Sour Cream had "this product is naturally free of gluten" but the BBQ didn't but I called and received a list with BBQ gluten-free on it.

Now, about a month or 2 later I looked at the BBQ ones and they now say "this product is naturally free of gluten". Now they don't have the barley malt on it but I'm staying away from them anyway. I don't know if they changed them or what was up with them having malt in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I eat Frito-Lay products that are considered gluten-free all the time and have no problem at all.

That was the only time I had a reaction and that was my fault due to not double checking. I think they changed the ingredients because before they had barley malt and now they don't and they say gluten-free. Even if it's on my list to eat I double check now I learned a good lesson from it.

Yeah I know they say that in fine print...thanx :D ...I'm sensitive to gluten but I'm not extremely sensitive like some people are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I'm really confused about is whether or not to eat anything from facilities that manufacture items with gluten in it. For instance, Frito Lay has plenty of snack items that are naturally gluten free, but are made in a facility where they also produce items containing gluten. Lines are thorougly washed between batches, but there still may be a slight residue of gluten.

Is it safe to eat these items?

I called Bob's Red Mill regarding their corn flour to ask them why it's not labelled gluten free. I was told that the corn flour is made in the same facility that gluten containing flours are made. Do we have to watch out for that now. I know we can have corn flour, soy flour, rice flour, etc., but what if they are produced in a facility where gluten items are made.

Please let me know your thoughts.

Tammy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob's Red Mill has a seperate room for their gluten free milling-ONLY the items marked gluten free are made specifically in that room. Anything else is milled in the facility with their other flours (if you've ever seen flour dust in the air and can imagine how it travels, then you probably will not want to use any products other than gluten-free!).

As far as the standards for gluten free labeling go, I think the current limit is either 200 or 500 parts per million. Bob's Red Mill tests less than 15 ppm (according to their website). Unfortunately, I've reacted to every Bob's product I've tried, so I guess I'm super sensitive :o

Good luck,

Nadia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it depends how sensitive you are. Some people don't have reactions to it while others do. Alot of places have things that are naturally gluten free and they clean the machines in between but could have residue on them.

I personally eat frito lay products that are on the gluten free list and I have not had a problem so far with their gluten free products.I did accidentally have something I thought was on the gluten-free list but was not and did have a reaction to that. I eat at some places with gluten free menus but they still serve gluten containing foods such as outback.

I am more sensitive then I was when I first started on the gluten free diet but still frito lay and other products have not caused me to have a reaction so I find them safe for me but it is a personal decision. Not everybody wants the risk of cross contamination because it is very possible there could be trace amounts so it is completely up to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think being "sensitive" should be a factor or not. It's either glutenfree 100% or not. I do not eat Frito-Lays products or any other that say they have been crosscontaminated. Other companies come up front telling Celiacs that they shouldn't have their products because of "slight resedues" and I agree.

However, some people feel safe with them. It is truly up to you and how you feel about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe there is a grey area as far as how sensitive people are and labeling. With the codex standard set at 200 ppm of gluten being able to be called "gluten free", then it's just up to the individual celiac to determine if a product is suitable or not. A product is technically gluten free, but still has gluten in it. Some celiacs react to it, some don't.

Has Frito-Lay ever tested any of their products? I don't eat any of their stuff, so I don't know. I know they have a pretty high risk of cross-contamination, so I stay away from them.

Peace-

Nadia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even if you don't react you still cause damage. If you eat a slice of wheat bread and don't react does that mean you can say it's glutenfree but not if your sensitive? Sure, that may be an extreme but glutenfree should be glutenfree not glutenfree to those who aren't sensitive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's very true the slightest bit can cause a lot of damage. It should be gluten free or not gluten free. Unfortunately these companies really don't help us out because they can say products are gluten-free with traces in it. I do think with any company that makes anything with gluten has a big chances of cross contamination(some companies more than others). It's a personal decision that you have to make.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI - the CODEX standard only applies in Europe. Plent of companies around here use it for reference, but it is not the standard used for US labels of "gluten-free". In fact, there is no good standardization of what "gluten-free" means in the US yet, but the food labeling law passed last year requires a definiton to be made by 2006.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish I had the time to read all of the entries. I've learned so much from this site and appreciate everyones efforts to keep us gluten-free/celiac disease sufferers informed. I apologize if this is a repeat, but I found a site that talked about cross contamination wconcerning many common products. Check it out. Take care all.

http://www.fastq.com/~jbpratt/recipes/alle...f/products.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Leidenschaft

The sad truth and bottom line is that even though we may not react, we do indeed continue to cause damage. :( Having said that, if I eliminated EVERY product that MAY be cross contaminated, I would have very little left to eat! For instance... Thai Kitchen (a recent discovery for me) would be eliminated based on the fact that they DO produce some products that contain gluten! :unsure: Since 14-16 hours a day I'm at my business where my cooking facilities are a tiny counter space cluttered with microwave, hot plate and toaster oven, convenience foods such as Thai Kitchen are a god send! :rolleyes:

Something IS making me sick lately, I'm on the waiting list to see an allergist, and have considered starting a food diary... hoping somebody has a template for the computer so the Dr. will actually be able to read my notes! :blink: I handle gluten every day, each time I feed my dogs or boarding dogs... I can't avoid that. I just try to remember to keep my sleeves out of it, and wash my hands frequently!

Today I haven't eaten a thing yet... glass of Tropicana Calcium enriched OJ, and several cups of Red Rose Tea! My belly is starting to rumble, and even my Glutino gluten-free Poppy Seed Bagels are on the suspect list! :( I'm not sure what to put in my belly these days! :unsure: I have reacted more in the last two months, than I did in my first year gluten-free!

New symptoms for me are excessive saliva and a metallic taste (on occasion) in my mouth... I did a google search on these symptoms and came up with MERCURY POISONING!!! :blink::o

Yeah right!! All of a sudden!! I'm SOOOOOO frustrated with feeling crappy when I do everything right!! Even my blood work from Feb. said everything was great!! How come I'm not feeling great???

Sorry to vent, just thankful this is a safe place to do it! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest gillian502

I have to agree 100% with "my suicidal turtle" and Tammy on this issue...whether or not we react to a product MEANS NOTHING. WAITING FOR A BAD REACTION IS NOT AN EFFECTIVE WAY TO TREAT THIS DISEASE.

I hope I'm not coming across as too pushy on this, but honestly, I've seen quite a few comments from people lately saying that a product is fine because they personally "do not react" to it. This is not good advice. A product is fine if it is gluten-free and has a relativley high chance of not being cross-contaminated. It's sad to have to be so strict about it but that's life for a Celiac.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I personally react to every bit of gluten that ever gets in me. I eat products that are on gluten free lists from companies or say that they are in fact gluten-free on the label. I have known people to react to things that are even made on a dedicated gluten-free line(which makes me think it may be something else) but everybody is different. Some people don't even get reactions so just going by reactions alone is not a good way to go but I do think its a big help for people like me who are very sensitive and react strongly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

at the risk of sounding stupid, especially since i have had this disease for so long, can someone describe exactly what the long term damage that is done to the body from ingesting gluten? i always thought it was more of a buildup process, like regularly ingesting gluten would do serious damage, and i am extremely strict (i usually don't eat out, and have avoided some commercial gluten-free products cos they made me sick).

that said, should i really feel like every time i get contaminated (like sometimes happens when going out to eat) i'm doing some kind of permanent damage to my body? and what exactly is that permanent damage? is it like slowly chipping away at my intestines or something?

i ask for two reasons.. 1 i would like a more scientific way of explaining to my friends why i have to be so strict, and 2 i'm only 24 so if every crumb does permanent damage doesn't that mean that ultimately, should i live to be old, i'm going to end up pretty sick no matter how careful i am unless i live in a gluten-free bubble haha?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BellyTimber

1. A legitimate gluten-free standard does not allow any oats nor wheat, not even Codex wheat. Etymologically the word celiac refers to wheat more than to gluten.

2. It also takes the cross-contamination issue rather seriously, or is up front about the possibility, in which case it must flag up explicitly that this is an inferior standard and not claim that it is properly adequate. Caterers must have it made clear to them there is advantage in preventing cross contami ation. gluten-free foods are good for everybody else too and they would enjoy the variety. In addition 90 times one in 133 comes to ...

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is something that I have always wondered...

I think that if ANY of us are reacting to a product then it would be wise to stay away from that product. For example, if lays chips are causing reactions in the super sensitve then that would mean that there are traces of gluten on the chips... right? So wouldn't that mean that every celiac who ate them would get intestinal damage. Or am I off base here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Astyanax,

There are many long-term complications of ingesting gluten including: cancer, osteoporosis, thyroid problems, malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies, etc. There are two lists on celiac.com about diseases/conditions associated with celiac--a "probably" list and a "definitely" list. Many of these can come about as a result of eating gluten long-term:

The probably list

The definitely list

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found something else that's good. Go to the main page at celiac.com. Then look above the mini-calendar, I think, and it says "first time users click here." The third or fourth slide has a shortened list of long-term problems, which includes:

  • Allergies & Asthma
  • Anemia
  • Arthritis
  • Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Autism
  • Cancer (Gastrointestinal carcinoma or lymphoma)
  • Diabetes (type 1)
  • Epilepsy
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Kidney Disease
  • Migraine Headaches
  • Nerve Disease
  • Osteoporosis
  • Thyroid Disorders

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites