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I understand not to eat the sushi with the imitation crabmeat and to be careful with soy sauce....which I can take my own. Just want some opinions as to whether or not safe?

I haven't posted in a while and have been doing very well....I am not celiac, only gluten sensitive....I fell off the wagon couple days last week into a birthday cake and have dearly paid...but I do eat out alot and I know that I have to be more careful.

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I understand not to eat the sushi with the imitation crabmeat and to be careful with soy sauce....which I can take my own. Just want some opinions as to whether or not safe?

I haven't posted in a while and have been doing very well....I am not celiac, only gluten sensitive....I fell off the wagon couple days last week into a birthday cake and have dearly paid...but I do eat out alot and I know that I have to be more careful.

i was reading the label of some of the sushi at HEB the other day and i believe the seaweed wrap has gluten in it. avoid that and the soy sauce and i think you'll be fine.

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It really varies so you have to ask and read labels. Some seaweed has gluten(in the seasoning-from soy sauce) and others don't. Traditionally it isn't supposed to but some places don't stick to tradition. The omlette(egg) pieces may have other ingredients added for flavor and they may or may not be gluten-free. The mayo based sauces also may/may not be gluten-free. The most popular Japanese brand of mayo that some Japanese places use, contains malt vinegar.

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:huh: Japanese food uses mayo? What types of food is it in?

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Its amazing how much mayo is used in Japan.

http://www.(Company Name Removed - They Spammed This Forum and are Banned)/Uwajimaya-Kewpie-May...z/dp/B00023T3IA

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from wiki--

Japanese mayonnaise.

Japanese mayonnaise is typically made with apple cider vinegar or rice vinegar and a small amount of MSG, which gives it a different flavor profile from mayonnaise made from distilled vinegar. It is most often sold in soft plastic squeeze bottles. Its texture is thinner than most Western commercial mayonnaise. A variety containing karashi (Japanese mustard) is also common.

Apart from salads, it is popular with dishes such as okonomiyaki, takoyaki and yakisoba and usually accompanies katsu and karaage. It is sometimes served with cooked vegetables, or mixed with soy sauce or wasabi and used as dips. In the Tōkai region, it is a frequent condiment on hiyashi chuka (cold noodle salad). Many fried seafood dishes are served with a side of mayonnaise for dipping. It is also not uncommon for Japanese to use mayonnaise in place of tomato sauce on pizza.

Kewpie (Q.P.) is the most popular brand of Japanese mayonnaise, advertised with a Kewpie doll logo.

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:huh: Japanese food uses mayo? What types of food is it in?

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I've given up buying nori in Hawaii, its all from Korea and processed with soy sauce. Not being in Japan for a year must be like going through withdrawl!

It really varies so you have to ask and read labels. Some seaweed has gluten(in the seasoning-from soy sauce) and others don't. Traditionally it isn't supposed to but some places don't stick to tradition. The omlette(egg) pieces may have other ingredients added for flavor and they may or may not be gluten-free. The mayo based sauces also may/may not be gluten-free. The most popular Japanese brand of mayo that some Japanese places use, contains malt vinegar.

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-

from wiki--

Japanese mayonnaise.

Japanese mayonnaise is typically made with apple cider vinegar or rice vinegar and a small amount of MSG, which gives it a different flavor profile from mayonnaise made from distilled vinegar. It is most often sold in soft plastic squeeze bottles. Its texture is thinner than most Western commercial mayonnaise. A variety containing karashi (Japanese mustard) is also common.

Apart from salads, it is popular with dishes such as okonomiyaki, takoyaki and yakisoba and usually accompanies katsu and karaage. It is sometimes served with cooked vegetables, or mixed with soy sauce or wasabi and used as dips. In the Tōkai region, it is a frequent condiment on hiyashi chuka (cold noodle salad). Many fried seafood dishes are served with a side of mayonnaise for dipping. It is also not uncommon for Japanese to use mayonnaise in place of tomato sauce on pizza.

Kewpie (Q.P.) is the most popular brand of Japanese mayonnaise, advertised with a Kewpie doll logo.

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Dang! I had no idea!

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I was at a store today with someone who was buying sushi. I have never looked at the stuff as it does not appeal to me at all. But I was reading the labels and all the ones I picked up were definately not gluten free. I would make sure if I was getting sushi that it had a label that listed all the ingredients.

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A lot of sushi isn't gluten free, *ESPECIALLY* store bought sushi (which isn't all that great, most of the time), but you can certainly find sushi that is. Blanket statements, unfortunately, are totally unhelpful for sushi. :)

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Ask if their crab is imitation or real, the imitation almost always is made with wheat flour.

Of course soy sauce.

Tamago (egg) is often made with soy sauce, again, ask.

kampyo (shaved gourd) is usually used in mixed vegetable rolls or futomaki, and is marinated in soy.

Usually the nori is plain seaweed, but again, ask.

Of course, not tempura rolls.

Eel (both kinds) are usually prepared with a sweet soy-based sauce.

No fish roe (fish eggs), these are processed with wheat also.

There is a dish called nama-chirashi, it's basically a big bowl of sushi rice topped with raw fish. You can ask them to vary what's on top based on your needs. Sashimi is also a good choice.

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