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Thyroid Test Results

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My thyroid test came back.

TSH 2.26 Range .3-3.0 (according to the endocrine association or something like that)

Free T4 1.07 Range .54-1.55

Free T3 3.1 Range .5-3.90

My question is: are these still considered "high normal"? My doctor still wants to do the radioactive iodine test and scans, but didn't say whether these are still "kinda" high.

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They don't look particularly high to me. That TSH seems high for Graves'. Have you had the autoimmune tests done? Hashimoto's can cycle hypo- and hyper- at first and it has to be ruled out before Graves' is diagnosed. There should also be TSI antibodies for Graves' disease.

Edited to add: I see from your other post that your family doctor is completely incompetent to treat thyroid disease, as he is unfamiliar with Graves' autoimmunity and is not ruling out Hashi's. Your endocrinologist will run the tests. If I were you I'd dig my heels in and don't let them do radioiodine without the autoimmune testing. The tests are called anti-TPO, TSI, and anti-thyroglobulin.

Edited by Skylark

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My doctor said my last TSH test which was 5.17 out of their range of 1-4.5. He said that showed HYPER thyroidism. It surprised me because all of you said the opposite.

He hadn't actually received the TSH test to my knowledge so he could have misunderstood me when I said it was off the charts. He only got the T4 and T3 tests from the GI.

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:blink: Run screaming!!!! Run, run, run!!! Don't let that man get close to you with radioiodine. You were hypothyroid, now you are OK. You probably have Hashimoto's, but the endo should sort it out.

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We are scheduling the endo on Monday since it is too late today. The iodine test is scheduled for Thursday and Friday, we will probably get in before that. I am hoping for a competent doctor.

This is hard for me, I'm young and it is hard learning that these people have no idea what they are doing. I trust them over and over and it leads to no answers.

My family doctor is a nice guy. He has only been a doctor for 3 years, my normal amazing genius family doctor is booked because he is retiring in 2013. Just my luck. 3 months to get into him. But we did get the endo referral and she is an older doctor which might or might not be a good sign. I need to learn to educate these people with what I know to be true.

Be my own advocate. My new years resolution. Just because they went to college doesn't mean anything. I found it odd that my tests came back normal because I have essentially been feeling the effects of a "flare up". Stomach cramps and horrible head aches, feels like way too much pressure along with waking up 6 or more times a night. My thyroid was swollen at the doctors office and my heart rate was high. He was worried about my heart so he put my on a beta blocker. I don't know if I should keep taking it. I have only taken it 3 days. Doesn't seem to be making me sleep better and since i started it I've been having worse headaches.

I guess I will keep taking it until we talk to the endo. It's a very small dosage and its the smallest pill I've ever seen. Once a day can't do that much damage. I am worried about taking ibuprofen with it, so do you know if that is ok?

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I'm sorry you're going through this. It's a sad state of affairs when we know more than our doctors. TSH stands for thyroid stimulating hormone. It's the hormone your hypothalamus (part of your brain) uses to signal your thyroid gland to make hormone. If your thyroid gland is not putting out enough hormone, your brain makes more and more TSH in an attempt to fix the shortage. When TSH climbs above 3.0, it's a sign that the thyroid gland isn't keeping up.

Hashimoto's can cycle between periods of hyper and hypo. You might have been hyper, but more likely with the high TSH you were hypo and having strong stress reactions. I get the swelling when my Hashi's flares from the inflammation. Check out what Dr. David Derry says about pulse in this article.

http://thyroid.about.com/od/thyroidbasicsthyroid101/l/bl9.htm

To check your medicines for interactions, this website is very good.

http://www.drugs.com/drug_interactions.html

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I really appreciate the links. Especially Dr. David Derry. It is more conclusive of hypo thyroid with my symptoms. You guys have so much knowledge and I really appreciate you sharing it.

Maybe one day I will be able to share mine with someone who needs it.

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I really appreciate the links. Especially Dr. David Derry. It is more conclusive of hypo thyroid with my symptoms. You guys have so much knowledge and I really appreciate you sharing it.

Maybe one day I will be able to share mine with someone who needs it.

That Derry article really, really helped me too.

If you hang around here for long you'll be helping folks before you know it. :)

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High TSH is hypothyroid, and a TSH of 0,00 is hyperthyroid but only if the ft4 and/or ft3 are above range. Some people have normal lowish TSH, with normal free

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My doctor said my last TSH test which was 5.17 out of their range of 1-4.5. He said that showed HYPER thyroidism. It surprised me because all of you said the opposite.

He hadn't actually received the TSH test to my knowledge so he could have misunderstood me when I said it was off the charts. He only got the T4 and T3 tests from the GI.

I join the chorus! RUN, as fast as you can, from this doc. The TSH test is a test of the pituitary hormone that stimulates the thyroid gland to produce more thyroid hormone. If your body is putting out too much Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, the most simple reason is that your thyroid is lagging in production (hypO not hypER). There are more complicated explanations, but best to start with the simplest.

The TSH can vary a lot during any given day, you would do well to have any thyroid tests done at the same time of day each time, if at all possible.

With numbers like yours, and lacking any antibody testing, I would in NO WAY allow any kind of radioactive testing. I would insist on antibody testing.

Good luck with your endo. My experience (and the experience of MANY thyroid patients) is that endos don't necessarily treat thyroid well. The ones I saw told me (with my TSH of 4.5 and FT4 almost out of bottom of range) that there was no way I was hypothyroid, and he wouldn't even consider treatment until my TSH was over 10. I've gotten the best treatment from my very aware GP.

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I join the chorus! RUN, as fast as you can, from this doc. The TSH test is a test of the pituitary hormone that stimulates the thyroid gland to produce more thyroid hormone. If your body is putting out too much Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, the most simple reason is that your thyroid is lagging in production (hypO not hypER). There are more complicated explanations, but best to start with the simplest.

The TSH can vary a lot during any given day, you would do well to have any thyroid tests done at the same time of day each time, if at all possible.

With numbers like yours, and lacking any antibody testing, I would in NO WAY allow any kind of radioactive testing. I would insist on antibody testing.

Good luck with your endo. My experience (and the experience of MANY thyroid patients) is that endos don't necessarily treat thyroid well. The ones I saw told me (with my TSH of 4.5 and FT4 almost out of bottom of range) that there was no way I was hypothyroid, and he wouldn't even consider treatment until my TSH was over 10. I've gotten the best treatment from my very aware GP.

This is good advice and I agree completely! I wouldn't go to an endo because all they want to do is expensive radioactive testing. You don't need that testing...do the simple blood work and you'll get some answers.

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