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gunny7

Dh And Future Children

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Hi there,

so my question is: Will my DH affect my future children? And what about celiac deasese ?

Thx for answers

Gabe

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Hi there,

so my question is: Will my DH affect my future children? And what about celiac deasese ?

Thx for answers

Gabe

Hello gunny7,

My research regarding your future children says: It could. To the best of my knowledge, DH / Celiac is hereditary. Check out this link:

http://www.celiac.com/articles/177/1/The-Gluten-Intolerance-Group-of-North-America-on-Iodine-and-Dermatitis-Herpetiformis/Page1.html

And:

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/

And while you're at it, this one isn't a bad one to contemplate:

http://www.gluten.net/learn/dermatitis-herpetiformis.aspx

Hope that helps & be well ALL,

WF

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Celiac disease is genetic and DH is the skin form of celiac. However not everyone who has the genes develops celiac/DH. If you want children don't let having DH/celiac stop you. Not only may they never develop celiac but if you are diagnosed you will be alert for signs and will know to have them screened periodically for celiac.

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Thx very much for those two answers. Can someone provide me links to the articles where it is written that DH/celiac is genetic and hereditary. Just want to look it with my own eyes.

And maybe some other users could participate and share opinion or experience?

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Here's one. There are many. just google "Celiac Centers". Many have easy to understand info about Celiac & DH.

A Genetic Testing

When an individual is diagnosed with celiac disease,

the entire family learns that they must be tested for

the condition, for they are now at risk. First degree

relatives (parent, child, sibling) have a 1 in 22 chance

of developing celiac disease in their lifetimes; in second

degree relatives, (aunt, uncle, cousin, grandparent) the

risk is 1 in 39.

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/CDCFactSheets4_Genetic.pdf

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gunny7, I am self diagnosed dh & therefore celiac. I have textbook dh & have gone strictly gluten free since Nov. 24. Have improved immeasurably. I can actually bear the way the dh presents itself these days. I'm getting steadily better.

There's no way to prove it now but I'm sure my mother had dh (& therefore celiac) but her dh presented milder than mine. She only got it in her scalp --- no where else. I saw & felt what she got in her scalp which drove her crazy with the itching. She had what I now KNOW was dh. Of course we didn't know that at the time. She, & therefore WE chalked it up to "nerves". So I guess I'm one of those 1 in 22 chances.

Now, I'll tell you something else. Who knows if it is a factor in why I am one of those 1 in 22. We may never live long enough for research to be done on this possibility IF it ever is done.

My mother was RH neg. & dad was RH pos. In the 40's & 50's you just had to take your chances & have a doc standing by in delivery room to perform an immediate transfusion. I am the youngest of 3 children. The chances of a child being born "not normal" increased with each subsequent child born of a RH neg./pos. couple. Child #3 was not supposed to stand much chance of being normal at all. Well, accidents happen, especially before the pill or vasectomy or etc...., etc..., etc..... The doctors said I would be born deaf, dumb or blind. I wasn't. Did that make me more susceptible to being the 1 in 22?

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My mother, uncle, son, and daughter have celiac (as I do), and my son, uncle, and I have DH, whereas my mom and daughter do not. This tells me that, while celiac and DH are hereditary, it doesn't necessarily mean that you'll suffer from BOTH maladies.

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The genes that predispose people to coeliac are quite common but most people with the genes don't get the disease.

That said, the disease is several times more common than it was a hundred years ago, based on comparison with stored blood samples.

Something in our modern life is causing the genes to be expressed more frequently as a disease.

If it was possible to determine what that was, we would be able to protect future generations.

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The genes that predispose people to coeliac are quite common but most people with the genes don't get the disease.

That said, the disease is several times more common than it was a hundred years ago, based on comparison with stored blood samples.

Something in our modern life is causing the genes to be expressed more frequently as a disease.

If it was possible to determine what that was, we would be able to protect future generations.

Hello itchy,

May I propose that being it's an inherently a genetic disorder, and given the fact that wheat ( gluten ) is so ubiquitous in pre-processed foods / diets, is it really any wonder ??? It is NOT to me anymore as eliminating gluten in my diet has made ALL the difference . . .

Since Celiac is " hard-wired " into the human genome, it appears to me that the only way to avoid the affliction is to abstain from the consumption / contact of / with the poisonous trigger, ie gluten in ANY form. I may be wrong, but it's just the way I must behave and " eat to live " now . . . By the way, I'm 1/2 French Basque and the rest European descent. A prime candidate for Celiac / DH am I.

However, the chemical and pharmaceutical industries have crippled us, not to mention that gluten is added to most pre-processed foods. To me it's all about Eugenics. If you're not familiar with that term, research it. Also, the Gulf Oil Disaster isn't over and neither is the radioactive dilemma of Fukushima. So many factors to consider, no ??? Never mind the Sodium Fluoride in your drinking water . . .

Also remember, those of us like me who suffer from Dermatitis Herpetiformis don't have nearly the small intestine damage as those who never manifest DH, so those who don't develop DH may never know they have Celiac.

My best to you and all,

WF

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Well one of my boys falls in the 1 in 22. It actually was because of him that I eventually found out I had celiac. I had to eliminate so many things from my diet when I was breastfeeding because of reactions he would have(rashes, colic severe reflux). I had inadvertantly went gluten light. After I added back all the things I eliminated I started having problems. Another 2.5 years later I was diagnosed.

I had my kids blood tested at that time also and they were both negative. Two years after my youngest son's negative test, he had positive blood work. He had been having reflux, stomach aches, and mood issues for about 6 months prior to the positive test. It all made sense. In hindsite I believe all the issues he had with food and his health up until he was about 3 years old were gluten related. His current allergist, after he had positive blood work, believes he never got completely over what affected him as a baby/toddler(which we now think was gluten), that it just manifested differently.

My oldest son has had consistant negative blood work and had a negative scope/biopsy in Aug. 2011. He went gluten free for a trial period of three months. Reasons: slow/stalled growth, chronic constipation since birth, stomach aches almost daily, nausea. Since going gluten free he is starting to grow and all the other symptoms are gone. He tried gluten over the Christmas break and he had mild stomach aches. He only ate it for about three days though. He has decided to stay gluten free at this point in time. He reminds me of how I was as a child a lot. I wonder if I had a slight problem with gluten but it didn't manifest as celiac until I was in my early 30's. It would be nice to save him the possible same fate as me. I now have three autoimmune disorders and may be looking at a 4th.

Honestly, "IF"(quite happy with just the two boys :P ) I wanted more children at this point after diagnosis, I wouldn't let the diagnosis stop me from having them.

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I think one could argue it's not a genetic 'disorder'.

Quite possibly the genes that cause it were once very helpful and helped us to survive.

Something has changed in our environment in the past few decades which has caused the genes to be expressed as a disorder. Coeliac is several times more common than 100 years ago, based on blood analysis.

So the disorder may be in our environment, not in our genes.

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I don't believe that the genes associated with coeliac are harmful mutations.

Rather they are common, natural genes that are helpful or benign in other circumstances.

I think it is likely that at some point we will discover what triggers coeliac, and at that point simple lifestyle changes will protect all future generations from the 'disease'.

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