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Deduced Amino Acid Sequence of an Alpha-Gliadin Gene from Spelt Wheat (Spelta) Includes Sequences Active in Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/189/1/Deduced-Amino-Acid-Sequence-of-an-Alpha-Gliadin-Gene-from-Spelt-Wheat-Spelta-Includes-Sequences-Active-in-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 07/26/1996
 
Authors: Kasarda DD. DOvidio R. Source Cereal Chemistry. 76(4):548-551, 1999 Jul-Aug. Abstract: Th

Authors: Kasarda DD. DOvidio R.
Source Cereal Chemistry. 76(4):548-551, 1999 Jul-Aug.

Abstract: The complete amino acid sequence of an alpha-type gliadin from spelt wheat (spelt) has been deduced from the cloned DNA sequence and compared with alpha-type gliadin sequences from bread wheat. The comparison showed only minor differences in amino acid sequences between the alpha-type gliadin from bread wheat and the alpha-type gliadin from spelt. The two sequences had an identity of 98.5%. Larger differences can be found between different alpha-type gliadin amino acid sequences from common bread wheat. Because all the different classes of gliadins, alpha, beta, gamma, and omega, appear to be active in celiac disease, it is reasonably certain that the spelta gliadin is also toxic. We conclude that spelta is not a safe grain for people with celiac disease, contrary to the implications in labeling a bread made from spelt as an alternative to wheat. Our conclusions are in accord with spelt and bread wheat being classed taxonomically as subspecies of the same genus and species, Triticum aestivum L. [References: 36]