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Early Pregnancy Loss in Celiac Women: The Role of Genetic Markers of Thrombophilia

10/05/2009 - Pregnant women with celiac disease suffer early pregnancy loss more often than women without celiac disease. A team of Italian researchers recently set out to look at a possible role of genetic pro-thrombotic variants in early pregnancy loss in women with celiac disease.

The research team was made up of C. Ciacci, R. Tortora, O. Scudiero, R. Di Fiore, F. Salvatore, and G. Castaldo. The team looked at 39 women with celiac disease, who had experienced at least two early pregnancy losses within the first 3 months of pregnancy, a control group of 72 celiac women with a history of one or more normal pregnancies with no pregnancy loss.

Each of the women were enrolled in the study immediately upon diagnosis for celiac disease, whereupon, the researchers obtained a clinical history obtained from each woman.

The researchers then screened leukocyte DNA for factor V Leiden (mutation G1691A), factor V R2 (H1299R), factor II (G20210A), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase
(MTHFR) (C677T and A1298C), beta-fibrinogen (−455 G>A), PAI-1 alleles 4G/5G, factor XIII (V34L), and HPA-1 (L33P).

Women with pregnancy losses were notably older (p = 0.002) among the celiacs than in controls. Of the gene variants examined, the allelic frequency of 4G variant of PAI-1, and the frequency of mutant genotypes were significantly more frequent in the group of celiac women with early pregnancy loss (p = 0.00003 and 0.028, respectively).

Interestingly, the beta-fibrinogen −455 G>A genotype distribution differs substantially between the two groups, though frequency of the variant allele remains the same. The control group showed more frequent variant genotypes (p = 0.009).

Based on these data, the research team believes the 4G variant of the PAI-I gene may predispose some celiac women who carry the gene to early pregnancy loss, though they note that their data should be confirmed on larger populations.


Digestive and Liver DiseaseVolume 41, Issue 10, October 2009, Pages 717-720

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7 Responses:

 
Elizabeth Belfiore
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
12 Oct 2009 6:03:31 AM PST
I had 2 premature births in my 20's & 30's. I am 62 & was
diagnosed with celiac at 51. First premature ended after 36 hours and second one my daughter is now 31 years of age.
She was born at the beginning of the 7 month and weighed
2lbs 13ozs.

 
Lisa Wu
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
12 Oct 2009 8:27:41 AM PST
I have 2 comments:
1. Thank you for summarizing peer reviewed journal articles related to celiac disease! I appreciate hearing about the latest research and your articles always prompt me to look further, and obtain the full article if possible!

2. I think you should make an important distinction in the 5th paragraph of your article. As I interpret the research article, the researchers noted a significant difference in age of diagnosis between the two groups, not age at which the pregnancy loss occurred. This does not come across as currently stated in your summary, and I think it is a critical point!

 
Marcia
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said this on
12 Oct 2009 11:39:10 AM PST
Can we get the Cliff Notes version? This was way too technical for me to understand.

 
Christi
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said this on
01 Jan 2010 6:54:53 PM PST
I agree with you Marcia!

 
Mandy
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said this on
26 Jan 2011 11:11:02 AM PST
I totally agree with Marcia! I am 30 years old and was diagnosed a year ago with celiac. We have been trying to conceive for a year and a half now and I just had my first miscarriage and I would like more information on the connection between celiac and miscarriages and problems with conception. I read that once our bodies heal that it would become easier but it's been almost a year since my diagnosis.

 
sabrina
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said this on
11 Oct 2011 6:11:08 AM PST
Mandy my nutritionist told me that it takes 2-3 years to heal completely and there are certain things in your diet to change to help the healing.

 
Martha
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said this on
10 Sep 2013 12:25:50 PM PST
Article a little hard to understand for the average person but still helpful. My story short and sweet. Started trying to get pregnant after marriage at 35. 8 pregnancies..3 births. All miscarriages around 11-14 weeks. After last baby was born which was 4 years ago I was so tired, so tired of looking pregnant all the time and always having stomach troubles. Was diagnosed with celiac disease in February of 2013.




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