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Can You Eat Gluten-Free Oats?


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54 replies to this topic

Poll: Can You Eat Gluten-Free Oats? (52 member(s) have cast votes)

Can you eat certified gluten-free oats?

  1. Yes (21 votes [40.38%])

    Percentage of vote: 40.38%

  2. No (15 votes [28.85%])

    Percentage of vote: 28.85%

  3. I'm not sure. I might have reacted. (6 votes [11.54%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.54%

  4. I haven't tried them. (10 votes [19.23%])

    Percentage of vote: 19.23%

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#31 come dance with me

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 01:50 AM

Just to clear things up a little bit. In Australia, it is ILLEGAL to label anything as "GLUTEN FREE" unless the following conditions are met:

NO Detectable Gluten (i.e. currently <3ppm detectable gluten)
NO Oats
NO Malted Cereals that contain Gluten (i.e. Wheat, Rye, Barley, Oats, Spelt, Triticale).


It is ILLEGAL to label anything in Australia as "LOW GLUTEN" unless the following conditions are met:

NO more than 200ppm Gluten
NO Oats
NO Malted Cereals that contain Gluten (i.e. Wheat, Rye, Barley, Oats, Spelt, Triticale).



Manufacturers may claim that their foods contain gluten, are high in gluten, or are a source of gluten.

All other claims in relation to gluten content of food are illegal (some examples of this include "gluten friendly", "gluten-less", "not gluten free", etc.)


Oats can be labelled as wheat free and if this is the case, they are most likely pure. Many Australian oats are pure and many bare the "wheat free" label. Freedom Foods and a couple of other companies sell them in the health food aisle of Woolworths and Coles supermarkets.

Thought I'd clear up the LAW for you all. :rolleyes:


Ok rolly eyes were a little uncalled for. My keyboard won't work too well. I can't type much and what I do type takes a long time. Thank you for clearing it up but yeah uncalled for. Think I'll look elsewhere for information thank you. I'd rather not put up with that.
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Lord please give me patience, because if you give me strength, I may just beat the living crap out of someone...

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#32 kellynolan82

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 01:53 AM

Ok rolly eyes were a little uncalled for. My keyboard won't work too well. I can't type much and what I do type takes a long time. Thank you for clearing it up but yeah uncalled for. Think I'll look elsewhere for information thank you. I'd rather not put up with that.


I'm sorry you found my comments uncalled for. I certainly did not intend for them to come across that way and I do apologise for the 'rolly eyes' that you mentioned. Everything in the above statement of mine is correct and as you may be aware I am taking a variety of companies to task on the issue of false gluten free advertising in Australia.
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#33 Skylark

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 10:57 AM

Ok rolly eyes were a little uncalled for. My keyboard won't work too well. I can't type much and what I do type takes a long time. Thank you for clearing it up but yeah uncalled for. Think I'll look elsewhere for information thank you. I'd rather not put up with that.

I think you misunderstood? I know on other boards the "eyeroll" emoticon can be quite sarcastic/rebellious but it just doesn't look that way to me on here. I think people tend to use it as a more interesting smiley than :).
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#34 mushroom

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 11:30 AM

Not willing to risk it .
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

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Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

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#35 hashimoto_hater

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 05:44 PM

:( My mother and I went to 2 celiac courses, and we were told to not bother with oats, some have gluten in them even if it is wheat free, as oats have their own gluten protein, i dont know what is is called. I once tried it last year (2010) and I got a really bad reaction. I get stomach cramps that make me want to scream, and then after around 8-9 hours of cramps I violently throw up. And i mean VIOLENTLY, I throw up stomach acid on a regular basis (every 3-4 months) and it feels like my eyes and brain are going to eplode or bulge out.
Unfortunately I also have a fat intolerance from my hashmotos, hence my name on here... and I get really down when ever i have a reaction as throwing up makes me really depressed as i am PETRIFIED of it, whenever i get a reaction i sit in front of the tv and just cry.
SO, we were told by a certified diatician that there is NO point eating oats. Maybe thats just in Australia.
Does any body know any hot chocolate substances that would have no gluten in it? I really miss it and its ending winter in Australia and I havent been able to have any........ it makes me sad....... :(
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#36 Skylark

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 06:45 PM

Make hot cocoa from cocoa powder, sugar, and milk. It's really good. Here's a web page with pretty much what I do.
http://www.joyofbaki...t/HotCocoa.html
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#37 hashimoto_hater

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 08:56 PM

I'm sorry you found my comments uncalled for. I certainly did not intend for them to come across that way and I do apologise for the 'rolly eyes' that you mentioned. Everything in the above statement of mine is correct and as you may be aware I am taking a variety of companies to task on the issue of false gluten free advertising in Australia.


I for one am not offeded by the rolly eyes, i didnt care actually, and if someone did (and im speaking from experience) saw it in WAY too much detail, theyh overreacted mate! Im from australia, and ive only been diagnosed just under a year, im struggling, my mum thinks she is and shes struggling.

Thankyou SO MUCH for your information.
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#38 hashimoto_hater

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 09:04 PM

[quote name='mushroom' timestamp='1313350248' post='722757']
ummmm your little line thingy down the bottom, well, obviously you are MUCH older than me (no offence, i mean in experience and maturity) and have had lots of things, but how come you are on here if you are only "intolerant"? Im a full blown celiac and what i wouldnt give to be not one, if you slf diagnose, you are ruining your life, it is s hard, ive been on it less thn a year and im already missing things i am also fat intolerant and hen i found out i almost screamed at the doctor. I know it isnt his fault but all im saying self-diagnosed people are usually wrong in their diagnoses, my mum diagnosed me as having a virus and actually i had hashimotos (2008) so check ith your doctor or change it to diagnosed.
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#39 Skylark

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 09:27 PM

ummmm your little line thingy down the bottom, well, obviously you are MUCH older than me (no offence, i mean in experience and maturity) and have had lots of things, but how come you are on here if you are only "intolerant"? Im a full blown celiac and what i wouldnt give to be not one, if you slf diagnose, you are ruining your life, it is s hard, ive been on it less thn a year and im already missing things i am also fat intolerant and hen i found out i almost screamed at the doctor. I know it isnt his fault but all im saying self-diagnosed people are usually wrong in their diagnoses, my mum diagnosed me as having a virus and actually i had hashimotos (2008) so check ith your doctor or change it to diagnosed.

You are not going to make any friends here minimizing gluten intolerance or coming after us self-diagnosed folks. Your post made me really angry. :ph34r:

Doctors failed to diagnose me for 30-odd years, including a childhood celiac test AFTER I was off wheat because guess what? It made me sick. I'm bloody well certain that gluten is what was making me so ill I almost flunked out of school, and functionally it matters not a whit whether some blasted doctor with his fancy diploma has "diagnosed" me. Heck, I worked harder for my fancy diploma than most doctors anyway since I did half of it with undiagnosed celiac disease.

Oh, and by the way I have had THREE doctors advise me to NOT gluten challenge because the tests are woefully inaccurate and they don't consider seeking a "diagnosis" worth making me ill.
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#40 mushroom

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 09:33 PM

hashimoto_hater, I had quit eating gluten long before I heard of celiac disease, and long before any doctor thought of testing me for it, instead telling me that I had irritable bowel syndrome and fibromyalgia and was a head case. I first quit gluten in the hopes that it would have a positive effect on my psoriatic arthritis because I knew that gluten free was helpful in treating ankylosing spondylitis. It has not noticeably affected my arthritis, but it has notably alleviated lots of my digestive problems, and I have been able to identify the others through trial and error while the so-called M.D. experts still for the most part look at me like I have rocks in my head (whereas they used to be in my stomach). I look at them and wish they knew more than they do.

I was certainly not going to make myself sick again just so that some M.D. could finally, after all these years, proclaim that I was in fact celiac and should not eat gluten. Well, duh!! Yes, I am much older than you I am sure, and have suffered much longer than you, so I don't think you are entitled to tell me what I should or should not do about my diagnosis. To most people I do not say I am celiac because I have never been tested for it; sometimes I do call myself celiac if necessary to get a point across. My whole family has similar issues to mine - the only one who has been tested and officially diagnosed celiac is my sister's daughter. This sister also eats gluten free after wasting away to almost skin and bones. No one thought to test her either.

I can assure you I am not ruining my life, I am saving it. Things that are hard are worth doing if they work. For me they work. You may choose to do whatever you want,

As you read and learn more about the gluten sensitivity/intolerance spectrum, you may (or may not) come to realize that the more research they do the harder the researchers are finding it to draw a line between where gluten intolerance ends and celiac disease begins. At the moment there is no test for gluten intolerance -- the only imperfect testing that has been devised is for that form of intolerance that has been labelled celiac disease and which specifically affects the small intestine. Other forms of the gluten intolerance affect the thyroid, the gall bladder, the pancreas, and most especially the nervous system. Often the people with nervous system manifestation test negative for celiac disease but their doctors diagnose them with celiac anyway because of other factors and positive response to the diet.

I would be very interested in what research evidence you have to support your statement that most self-diagnosed people are usually wrong in their diagnosis.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#41 Nor_TX

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 03:53 AM

I agree with Mushroom. To come new to a forum and after a couple of posts you consider yourself an expert on gluten free/gluten intolerant issues is a little presumptuous don't you think. There are studies and lots of articles in current publications discussing this absolute topic. Interolerance is as much a real disease as is being full blown Celiac. We get sick, we throw up, we have potty issues, we have body aches and we have pain. Myself, I am gluten intolerant. The diagnosis was deduced after an endoscopy and doctor did not want to do any further blood tests. She told me to not eat gluten and see if I get better. Well I did... and then I did. Now, don't tell me I don't belong on this forum. That is something someone immature and rude would say. Does that describe your personalitiy?

You will find no other forum as kind, as compassionate, and as caring towards its members. You would be in good stead to offer up some manners, if you know what those are. "I'm sorry" goes a long way to med fences. If you missed the "manners" life lessons, I'm sure you could look those up on the internet and become an expert.

Both Celiac and Gluten Intolerance are honest-to-god health issues even if they are not in your present rule book.

Almost everyone in my family has either colitis, a gluten issue, IBS (now being controlled by a gluten free diet) or celiac disease. It his us when some of us were young like you and some when they were old like me. One is not more important than the other, one is not harder to deal with than the other.

Also if you continue to yell at your doctor because of a medical condition that you have, I feel sorry for you. Why you ask? Because you will be someone who will have to run from doctor to doctor to find one, after each throws you out.

Pull up your big girl panties and grow up. Life isn't always about you, sometimes life goes on around you and you can only simply watch and learn. And that is what I suggest you do, Watch and Learn.
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Gluten Intolerance, Colitis, IBS, Lactose and Casein Intolerance, Gastro-Paresis, GERD, Arthritis. Taking Remicade and Asacol, 2 Prilosec/day among other meds. Officially a senior citizen! New knee is doing well.. now about that other knee...

Food is in my dreams and in my nightmares!

#42 modiddly16

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 04:38 AM

I sure can't, which is a bummer because I used to love oatmeal. I found out from those delicious oatmeal raisin gluten free cookies, which then brought me to test out actual oatmeal and it wasn't pleasant!
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#43 lynnelise

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 05:11 AM

I can't fathom someone actually telling a person who knows their body after years of exerience to go to the doctor or change their signature line to say they are diagnosed. This is the Celiac AND Gluten Free forum. Not everyone is gluten free for the same reason. Some are autistic, some have Crohn's or colitis and find relief this way, others fibromyalsia, one guy has gluten induced epilepsy, and ALL belong on this forum!!! For your information doctors don't know everything. My doctor told me that my blood test wouldn't be affected by the fact that I had already quit eating gluten! Well now I find it should be common knowledge that you have to eat gluten for your body to react. Therefore my test was inaccurate and a waste of money. Before going on this diet I couldn't leave my house without taking large doses of Immodium! My B12 levels were in the gutter. I had gastritis, duodenitis, and esophigitis. Now my intestines are no longer inflamed, I absorb vitamins, and have little need for Immodium. It certainly doesn't sound like the gluten-free diet is dangerous for me now does it???
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#44 Jenniferxgfx

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 07:59 AM

That comment about self-diagnosing was really hurtful and insulting.

Doctors have failed to dx me for 30+ years, so I think you put far too much faith in doctors' worth and abilities.

This forum has changed my life, and someone coming in, insults blazing, is just laughable. What kind of person does that? Someone with the privileges of a "classic case" and access to good healthcare.
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glutenfree since 6/2011. sick for 30 years.

borderline blood test, negative biopsy.

SEVERELY sensitive celiac with DH. sensitive to contact and ingestion.

asthma (was severe; improved exponentially after 6/11)

spina bifida & childhood SCI at L4/L5 (possibly complicated by weak bones)

countless fractures and infections.

i once listed over 100 symptoms or conditions that improved or were eliminated after 6/11.

very vegan. and, of course, i've also discovered some other food allergies.


#45 dilettantesteph

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 06:53 AM

I tried oats after healing for 6 months or so. They were gluten free oats BRM. They had a little disclaimer on the package about some celiacs not being able to eat oats, but I didn't take it seriously. I was so looking forward to eating oats. I cooked up a bowl and ate half of it. It made me sick for 2 months or so. I really regretted not just trying a tiny bit the first time. What a dummy!

The only good thing about it is that I realized that cc from oats could also be an issue for me. I improved when I avoided things made in the same facility as gluten-free oats.
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