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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    King Cake (Gluten-Free)


    Jules Shepard

    Celiac.com 01/15/2010 - King Cakes are used to select Mardi Gras Kings and Queens as well as to celebrate the season in households and at parties across the country. King Cakes have many looks, the most classic being a crown shaped pastry dotted with the sugared colors of Carnival: purple, gold and green.  Some have fillings, others do not, though they all house a hidden trinket like a plastic (formerly porcelain) baby.


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    The trinket hidden inside each cake adds to its popularity, although the uninitiated often fail to recognize that finding the trinket inside your piece of cake may come not only with privileges (good fortune and/or becoming the King or Queen of the ball) but just as often with responsibilities (bringing the next cake!). 

    Make sure the next person to bring a King Cake to your party brings this one so everyone can enjoy it!

    Gluten-Free King Cake Recipe

    King Cake (Gluten-Free)Pastry Ingredients:
    ¼ cup warm water (110 F)
    1 Tbs. granulated cane sugar
    2 ¼ tsp. (1 packet) highlyactive, fast rise yeast
    ½ cup unsalted butter ornon-dairy alternative (e.g. Earth Balance® Buttery Sticks)
    3 Tbs. granulated cane sugar
    ¼ cup warm milk (dairy ornon-dairy)
    2 large eggs
    3 cups Jules Gluten FreeAll Purpose Flour
    ½ tsp. ground nutmeg
    2 tsp. gluten-free baking powder
    ½ tsp. salt (¼ tsp. saltif using non-dairy alternative)
    2 Tbs. milk (dairy or non-dairy) forbrushing on pastry before baking

    Filling Ingredients:
    4 Tbs. butter or non-dairy alternative(e.g. Earth Balance® Buttery Sticks)
    ¾ cup packed light brown sugar
    1 ½ tsp. ground cinnamon
    ¼ cup Jules Gluten FreeAll Purpose Flour
    1 apple, peeled and chopped
    2/3 cup chopped pecans (optional)

    Gluten-Free Icing Ingredients:
    1 cup confectioner's sugar
    1-2 Tbs. milk (dairy or non-dairy)
    ¼ tsp. almond extract (optional)
    Colored sugar (purple, gold and green)

    Directions:
    Prepare the filling by melting the 4tablespoons butter and setting aside. In a separate bowl, toss thechopped apples with the Jules Gluten Free All PurposeFlour. Whisk together the brown sugar and cinnamon; stir the flouredapples in with the sugar-cinnamon mixture.

    In a small bowl, combine the warmwater, 1 tablespoon sugar and yeast; stir and set aside to proof.  Ifthe mixture is not bubbly and doubled in volume after 5-10 minutes,toss out and start again with fresh yeast.

    In a large mixing bowl, blend theremaining 3 tablespoons sugar and butter until lighter and fluffy. Add the milk and eggs and beat until well-integrated. Add 2 cups ofJules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour, salt, baking powderand nutmeg and mix well. Stir in the proofed yeast-sugar-watermixture, then add the remaining 1 cup Jules Gluten FreeAll Purpose Flour.  Beat another 1-2 minutes, until the dough isclumping together and is not too sticky.

    King Cake (Gluten-Free)Prepare a large baking sheet by liningwith parchment paper. Turn the dough out onto a pastry mat or aclean counter dusted lightly with Jules Gluten Free AllPurpose Flour. Roll the dough out to an elongated rectangle 24-30inches long by 9-10 inches wide. Brush on the melted butter for thetopping, coating the entire rectangle. Sprinkle the topping mixtureon top of the melted butter, spreading to the ends of the rectangle,but leaving 1/2-1 inch without topping on each of the long sides ofthe rectangle.

    Using a pastry blade or a spatula,gently peel up one of the long sides of the rectangle and beginrolling it as you would a jelly roll. Once the entire pastry isrolled upon itself until no pastry remains unrolled, a 24-30 inchlong roll will remain.

    Gently pull the two ends of the roll togetherto form a circle or oval.  Dabbing the ends of the pastry with water,join the ends together to close the circle. Gently transfer the ringto the parchment-lined baking sheet, or transfer the ring on thesilicone baking mat to the baking sheet. Brush the milk on top ofthe exposed pastry, then using a large sharp knife, make a cut in thetop of the pastry every 2 inches to expose one layer of the roll.

    Spray a sheet of wax paper with cooking oil, then cover the cake andlet rise in a warm spot for 20-30 minutes like a warming drawer or anoven heated to 200 F then turned off.

    Preheat oven to 350 F (static) or 325 F(convection).

    Remove the wax paper from the cake andbake for 20-25 minutes. Remove to a wire rack to cool. Whilecooling, mix icing ingredients and drizzle over the cake. Sprinklecolored sugar on top of wet icing, alternating colors between eachcut in the top of the cake. Once cooled, insert a pecan or small plasticbaby into the underside of the cake to hide it. Serve when fullycooled.



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    Guest Annette

    Posted

    At last, a real Kings Cake! Can't wait to try it. In France, they use almond paste.....they eat this cake on Epiphany (Jan . 6th)

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  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    This recipe comes to us from Lynn Facey.
    2 cups gluten-free flour (Bette Hagmans)
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    1 ½ cups sugar
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    3 ½ teaspoon baking powder
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    1 teaspoon vanilla
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    Scott Adams
    This recipe comes to us from Jonathan Nichols.
    1 ½ cup gluten-free chocolate chips
    1 - 19 oz. can (pre-cooked) chickpeas, drained and rinsed
    4 eggs or 1 cup egg substitute
    ½ teaspoon baking powder
    1 cup sugar or less to taste
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    Jules Shepard
    Celiac.com 02/23/2008 - Before we get to the details of how to make this amazing gluten-free chocolate cake, I think a few words on the latest gluten-free beers are in order.
    You probably already know that Anheuser-Busch has made their very own sorghum beer - Redbridge - which is widely available (if your favorite establishments do not carry it yet, tell them to order it from their distributor!).  This beer truly tastes like it comes from the Budweiser family; during the Superbowl, for example, I was grateful to have the perfect football-watching beer at my fingertips again!
    For this cake recipe though, I needed something with more body and a richer taste.  I explored the options at my favorite little specialty shop in historic Ellicott City, Maryland - Carpe Vinum.  If you are ever in the neighborhood, stop by and have a chat with the proprietor, John.  He is a most fascinating man and will order with a smile whatever you desire in the realm of wines and beers.
    Ok, back to the beer.  So, John and I chatted and I decided to try two different beers for my cake experiments: Hambleton Ales' "Toleration Ale" (http://www.hambletonales.co.uk/gfa.htm) out of the UK, and Green's Endeavour Dubbel Dark (http://www.glutenfreebeers.co.uk/) from Belgium.  The website of Green's US distributor (http://www.merchantduvin.com/pages/5_breweries/greens.html) has some useful trivia on the grains Green's uses in its vegan beer -- a drink which boasts no wheat, barley, crustaceans, eggs, fish, peanuts, soya beans, milk, lactose, nuts, celery, mustard, sesame seeds, sulphur dioxide or sulfites (please stop me if I ever do drink a beverage containing crustaceans - yuck!).  I'll admit that I was so grateful to have gluten-free beer options that I bought one of all he had in the store, but I settled on these two for making my cakes (I did my own beer taste test later...).
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    xoxo,
    ~jules
    Gluten-Free Chocolate Beer Cake
    Ingredients:
    1 cup gluten-free ale
    8 Tbs. unsalted butter or Earth Balance Shortening
    ¾ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
    2 cups granulated cane sugar
    ¾ cup sour cream or Tofutti Sour Supreme
    2 eggs
    1 Tablespoon gluten-free vanilla extract
    2 cups All Purpose Nearly Normal Gluten-Free Flour Mix
    1 Tablespoon baking soda
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    Preheat oven to 350F.
    (Note- you will need a large saucepan for this recipe, not a mixer and mixing bowl!)
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    Easy Cream Cheese Frosting:
    8 oz. cream cheese (can use fat free!)
    1 cup confectioners' sugar
    ½ cup heavy cream (can use half & half, but use less than ½ cup)
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/21/2014 - This holiday twist adds pumpkin and spice to one of our most popular gluten-free cheesecake dessert recipes. It’s sure to be a big hit with cheesecake lovers, pumpkin pie lovers and, most importantly, gluten-free eaters looking for a delicious dessert.
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    Jefferson Adams
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