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    Summertime Pear Butternut Soup (Gluten-Free)


    Jefferson Adams
    Summertime Pear Butternut Soup (Gluten-Free)
    Image Caption: Perfect hot or cold, this butternut squash soup delivers. Photo: CC--Ruth Hartnup

    Celiac.com 09/20/2016 - Pears freshen up this fall classic and make it perfect for summer or the early days of fall. Served warm or chilled, this soup makes a great focal point of a light dinner.

    Ingredients:

    • 4 tablespoons butter
    • 4 cups chicken broth
    • 4 ripe pears, peeled, quartered and cored
    • 2½ pounds butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 2-inch chunks
    • 2 medium tomatoes, cored and quartered
    • 1 large leek, pale green and white parts only, halved lengthwise, sliced and washed thoroughly
    • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
    • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    • ½ teaspoon salt
    • 1 sprig rosemary
    • Freshly ground pepper, to taste
    • 1 tablespoon thinly sliced fresh chives, or scallion greens
    • Heavy cream

    Directions:
    In a 4-quart saucepan melt the butter over medium-high heat, add the leeks and garlic, and sweat them a bit.

    Add squash, tomatoes, and pears, and sweat them a bit. Add salt.

    Pour in just enough stock to cover the main ingredients.

    Add sprig of rosemary, and bring to a simmer and cook until squash is fork tender about 15 to 18 minutes.

    Remove rosemary.

    Puree with immersion blender. Or carefully blend in small batches.

    Add a touch of cream and season, to taste.

    Top with fresh pepper, and sliced fresh chives, or scallion greens, and serve warm or chilled.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/11/2015 - Broth is the new black. Read the food magazines and blogs and you will inevitably come upon an article about the benefits of broth. But, unlike so many health foods, broth is not an overhyped fad food.
    Broth can be digested by every body, and broth is healthy for everyone.
    For people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance, broth can be part of a diet that promotes healing and wellness of the gut, the immune system, the bones and more.
    From baby to granny and from sickest to healthiest, broth has something for everyone.
    Ingredients:
    4 pounds beef marrow and knuckle bones 3 pounds meaty rib or neck bones 4 or more quarts cold filtered water ½ cup cider vinegar 3 onions, coarsely chopped 3 carrots, coarsely chopped 3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped several sprigs of fresh thyme, tied together 1 teaspoon dried peppercorns, crushed l bunch flat parsley, chopped Directions:
    Place the knuckle and marrow bones into a very large pot with vinegar and cover with water. Let sit for one hour.
    Meanwhile, place the meaty bones in a roasting pan and brown at 350 degrees in the oven.
    When well browned, add to the pot along with the vegetables. Pour the fat out of the roasting pan, add cold water to the pan, set over a high flame and bring to a boil, stirring with a wooden spoon to loosen up coagulated juices.
    Add this liquid to the pot. Top with water, if needed, just enough to cover the bones.
    **NOTE: Remember to keep the liquid no higher than one inch below the rim of the pot, as the volume expands slightly during cooking.
    Bring pot to a boil.
    A large amount of frothy scum will rise to the top, and it is important to remove this with a spoon or mesh skimmer. After you have skimmed, reduce heat and add the thyme and crushed peppercorns.
    Simmer stock for at least 12 and as long as 72 hours. Just before finishing, add the parsley and simmer another 10 minutes.
    At this point, the broth will look more like a scary brown liquid with globs of gelatinous and fatty material. It won’t even smell very good.
    However, all you need to do is to strain it properly to get a delicious and nourishing clear broth that you can use for myriad soups and stews and other dishes.
    So, remove bones with tongs or a slotted spoon, and strain the stock through a sieve or mesh strainer and into a large bowl.
    Refrigerate the bowl and, once it’s cold, remove the hardened fat from the top.
    Transfer to smaller containers, and freeze for long-term storage.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/17/2015 - Homemade bone broth is a great foundation for a healthy diet, and helps to promote gut healing, and overall health.
    Simmering animal bones and marrow, feet, tendons, and ligaments in water for one or two days turns collagen into gelatin, and produces a rich complex soup of amino acids and highly absorbable minerals like calcium, magnesium, sulfur, silicon, phosphorus, along with trace minerals.
    For best results use organic pasture raised, or free-range chickens. Many commercially-raised chickens produce stock that does not gel properly.
    Ingredients:
    1 whole free-range chicken or 2 to 3 pounds of bony chicken parts, such as backs, breastbones, necks and wings 2-4 chicken feet gizzards from one chicken 4 quarts cold water 2 tablespoons vinegar 1 large onion, coarsely chopped 2 carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped 3 celery stalks, with leaves, coarsely chopped 1 bunch flat parsley Directions:
    If you are using a whole chicken, cut off the wings and remove the neck, and the gizzards from the cavity.
    Cut chicken parts, including neck and wings, into several pieces.
    Place chicken or chicken pieces in a large stock pot with water, vinegar and all vegetables, except parsley.
    Let stand 30 minutes to 1 hour. Bring to a boil, and skim away any froth that rises to the top.
    Reduce heat, cover and simmer for at least 6 to 8 hours, and up to 24 hours. Longer simmering time makes richer and more flavorful broth.
    About 10 minutes before finishing the stock, add parsley. This is important, as is adds ionized minerals to the broth.
    Remove chicken carcass and any meat and bones with a slotted spoon. If using a whole chicken, let it cool and then strip the meat away.
    Keep the meat to use in other meals, such as chicken salad, casseroles, enchiladas. You can also add it to any soup you might make with the broth later on.
    Strain the stock into a large bowl and refrigerate until the fat rises to the top and hardens.
    Skim off fat and store the stock in covered containers in your refrigerator or freezer.
    Use broth liberally whenever a recipe calls for broth.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/24/2015 - I've posted recipes for chicken and beef broth lately, and now it's time for what may be the healthiest of all broths, fish broth.
    Naturally gluten-free fish broth offers a delicious way to promote gut health, and recovery from illness.
    Ideally, fish broth is made from the bones of sole or turbot. Unfortunately, it's hard to get whole sole fish in America. However, you can make a great broth using any non-oily fish, such as snapper, rock fish, or lingcod. Ask your fish merchant to save the carcasses for you.
    Avoid using oily fish such as salmon for making broth, mainly because oily fish will make the broth turn rancid during the long cooking process.
    Be sure to use the heads as well as the bodies, as the heads are especially rich in iodine and fat-soluble vitamins. Use the broth any time you make seafood-based stews, soups, or chowders.
    Ingredients:
    3 or 5 whole carcasses, including heads, of non-oily fish such as sole, turbot, rockfish or snapper about 3 quarts cold filtered water 2 or 3 sprigs fresh thyme 2 or 3 sprigs parsley 2 onions, coarsely chopped ¼ cup dry sake, white wine or vermouth ⅓ cup vinegar Sea salt to taste Directions:
    Melt butter in a large stainless steel pot.
    Add the vegetables and cook very gently, about 30 minutes, until they are soft.
    Add wine and bring to a boil. Add the fish carcasses and cover with cold, filtered water. Add vinegar.
    Bring to a boil and skim off the scum and impurities as they rise to the top. Tie herbs together and add to the pot.
    Reduce heat, cover and simmer for at least 4 hours or as long as 24 hours. I usually cook it for about 12-24 hours.
    Remove carcasses with tongs or a slotted spoon and strain the liquid into pint-sized storage containers for refrigerator or freezer.
    Chill well in the refrigerator and remove any congealed fat before transferring to the freezer for long-term storage.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/27/2015 - Soup season looms large, and this curry chicken soup will surely foot the bill. Chicken, rice, onions, celery and carrots anchor this delightful soup that gets a tangy zing from the addition of some tart apples.
    Ingredients:
    1½ pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs, trimmed of visible fat 2½ cups chicken stock 2½ cups water 1 large onion, chopped 2 medium Yukon Gold potatoes, parboiled chunks 2 ribs celery, chopped 2 carrots, chopped 2 tablespoons butter 1½ tablespoons yellow curry powder, to taste 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 bay leaves 1½ teaspoons kosher salt ⅓ cup uncooked basmati rice 2 tart apples, cored, peeled, and chopped ¼ cup heavy whipping cream ½ cup plain yogurt as garnish 1½ tablespoons minced chives as garnish Directions:
    Parboil, rinse and dry potatoes in advance.
    Heat butter and olive oil on medium high heat in a large stock pot.
    Add the onions, celery, and carrots. Cook for 5 minutes until just starting to soften.
    Add the bay leaves. Add the curry powder and mix to coat.
    Add the chicken thighs and potato chunks, and stir to coat with the curry mixture.
    Add the stock, water and salt to the pot.
    Bring to a simmer for about 20 minutes.
    Remove the chicken pieces from the pot.
    When the chicken is cooked through, remove from pot and place on a cutting board and allow to cool to the touch.
    Add the rice and the chopped apples to the soup.
    Return to a high simmer for about 15 minutes, until the rice is cooked through.
    While the apples and rice are cooking in the soup, shred the chicken, discarding any tough bits.
    Once the rice and apples in the soup are cooked, add the chicken back to the pot. Heat for 5 minutes more.
    Then stir in the cream. Serve warm with toasted gluten-free bread.

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