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    Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients)

    Scott Adams
    • This list focuses on unsafe/forbidden foods and ingredients (non-gluten-free) for those with celiac disease (USA and Canada)

    A
    Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum)
    Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types)
    Atta Flour

    B
    Barley Grass (can contain seeds)
    Barley Hordeum vulgare
    Barley Malt
    Beer (most contain barley or wheat)
    Bleached Flour
    Bran
    Bread Flour
    Brewer's Yeast
    Brown Flour
    Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts)
    Bulgur Wheat

    C
    Cereal Binding
    Chilton
    Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum)
    Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Cookie Crumbs
    Cookie Dough
    Cookie Dough Pieces
    Couscous
    Criped Rice

    D
    Dinkle (Spelt)
    Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate
    Durum wheat (Triticum durum)

    E
    Edible Coatings
    Edible Films
    Edible Starch
    Einkorn (Triticum monococcum)
    Emmer (Triticum dicoccon)
    Enriched Bleached Flour
    Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour
    Enriched Flour

    F
    Farik
    Farina
    Farina Graham
    Farro
    Filler
    Flour (normally this is wheat)
    Freekeh
    Frikeh
    Fu (dried wheat gluten)

    G
    Germ
    Graham Flour
    Granary Flour
    Groats (barley, wheat)

    H
    Hard Wheat
    Heeng
    Hing
    Hordeum Vulgare Extract
    Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

    K
    Kamut (Pasta wheat)
    Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce)
    Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce)
    Kluski Pasta

    M
    Maida (Indian wheat flour)
    Malt
    Malted Barley Flour
    Malted Milk
    Malt Extract
    Malt Syrup
    Malt Flavoring
    Malt Vinegar
    Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Matza
    Matzah
    Matzo
    Matzo Semolina
    Meripro 711
    Mir

    N
    Nishasta

    O
    Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum)
    Orzo Pasta

    P
    Pasta
    Pearl Barley
    Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum)
    Perungayam
    Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum)
    Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum)

    R
    Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used)
    Roux
    Rusk
    Rye

    S
    Seitan
    Semolina
    Semolina Triticum
    Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Small Spelt
    Spirits (Specific Types)
    Spelt (Triticum spelta)
    Sprouted Wheat or Barley
    Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
    Strong Flour
    Suet in Packets

    T
    Tabbouleh
    Tabouli
    Teriyaki Sauce
    Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii)
    Triticale X triticosecale
    Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids
    Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract
    Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil

    U
    Udon (wheat noodles)
    Unbleached Flour

    V
    Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Vital Wheat Gluten

    W
    Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum
    Wheat Amino Acids
    Wheat Bran Extract
    Wheat, Bulgur
    Wheat Durum Triticum
    Wheat Germ Extract
    Wheat Germ Glycerides
    Wheat Germ Oil
    Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
    Wheat Grass (can contain seeds)
    Wheat Nuts
    Wheat Protein
    Wheat Starch
    Wheat Triticum aestivum
    Wheat Triticum Monococcum
    Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract
    Whole-Meal Flour
    Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim)
    Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)

    The following items may or may not contain gluten depending on where and how they are made, and it is sometimes necessary to check with the manufacturer to find out:

    • Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein2
    • Artificial Color2
    • Baking Powder2
    • Clarifying Agents2
    • Coloring2
    • Dry Roasted Nuts2
    • Emulsifiers2
    • Enzymes2
    • Fat Replacer2
    • Gravy Cubes2
    • Ground Spices2
    • Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten2
    • Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein2
    • Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol2
    • Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch2
    • Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate2
    • Hydroxypropylated Starch2
    • Miso2
    • Natural Juices2
    • Non-dairy Creamer2
    • Pregelatinized Starch2
    • Protein Hydrolysates2
    • Seafood Analogs2
    • Seasonings2
    • Sirimi2
    • Soba Noodles2
    • Soy Sauce2
    • Soy Sauce Solids2
    • Sphingolipids2
    • Stabilizers2
    • Starch1, 2
    • Stock Cubes2
    • Suet2
    • Tocopherols2
    • Vegetable Broth2
    • Vegetable Gum2
    • Vegetable Protein2
    • Vegetable Starch2
    • Vitamins2
    • 1) If this ingredient is made in North America it is likely to be gluten-free.
    • 2) Can utilize a gluten-containing grain or by-product in the manufacturing process, or as an ingredient.

    Edited by Scott Adams


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    Guest Esther Ames

    Posted

    SOOOOOOOO helpful!

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    Guest Holly

    Posted

    The list is so long. It makes me want to bypass processed foods altogether. I'm sure others share the frustration of thinking 'what CAN I eat anymore?' I already can't eat any dairy, and now I know I can't eat gluten either has left me feeling betrayed...by the government's push for the 4 food groups since I was a kid and by my own body. Celiac sucks. I wish the rest of the world would wake up to this condition and give us all a break with reliable 'contains gluten' kind of labeling on all food products.

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    I am Gluten and Lactose Intolerant. I just came from Borders Books, where I found a very useful Gluten Free Cookbook, which had a very extensive and useful 'gluten ingredient list'.

     

    I declined to buy the book however, as it really was too expensive. I figured I'd go online and try to find a similar list to the one in the book. Well, I Gogled it, and Wow! I came up with your list. Thank you so much, I'll print out the list now, and use it as my Gluten Free Bible.

     

    Can't Thank you enough.

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    Guest angelia

    Posted

    I am gluten and lactose intolerant and it really is hard to figure out what you can and can not eat. This list is great and free. It is hard enough to afford to eat gluten free without having to buy books for information.

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    Guest Venomous Kate

    Posted

    Thank you so much for this list! I was recently diagnosed after years of declining health.

     

    Going Gluten-Free has involved a huge learning curve for me, and more than once I've found myself getting frustrated in the grocery store as I try to figure out what I can/can't eat. I'm printing off this list of yours and laminating it for use when grocery shopping. Thank you!

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    This is awesome! Thanks for posting this. I am a new to the gluten-free world and am a little overwhelmed with the information. This is a great list to print out and take with me to the stores...easy to compare.

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    Guest Kayleigh

    Posted

    This is a great site. I'm 15 years old and I have celiac! It is so hard to go to friends' houses and explain my disease, and school is hard to, because all school lunches contain gluten. I'm glad to know I'm not the only kid with celiac.

     

    Also, going gluten free helped my acne...

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    Guest Shari

    Posted

    I have been sick all of my life, and have had so many doctors tell me it was all in my head! As if I was so sick I couldn't even think straight! I was diagnosed with a wheat allergy in my 20's, given allergy shots, and kept going into anaphylactic shock. Now at 53, I've finally been diagnosed with celiac disease, but I believe now that I've had this all my life. I learned that this disease is the reason I had 7 miscarriages and why my teeth (which I have taken immaculate care of) turned bright yellow in my twenties. I could eat as much as 4 large men, yet I was skinny as a beanpole - people thought I must have a wonderful metabolism and were so jealous. I was starving all the time, and I could never get enough to eat. I went to doctor, after doctor, after doctor, and had them scratch their heads (literally) in puzzlement over my myriad of symptoms, but not one gave me a celiac test until two weeks ago. They would tell me that my problem must be psychiatric, because they couldn't see how anything was wrong! I didn't have skin rashes, nothing showed outwardly. I was slender (who wouldn't love that?) - so why was I complaining? How is it that these doctors managed to get through medical school? By the time I was diagnosed, I was having to go to the hospital on a weekly basis before one brilliant doctor - who happens to have immigrated to the USA from Brazil - figured out what was wrong with me! Not a single U.S.-trained doctor was a bit of help! So if there are other patients out there like myself, who have to wait to get a Brazilian-trained doctor to diagnose them, then my heart goes out to them! Anyway, this website is now in my 'Favorites' list, and I thank God that there is something out there that is truly helpful. There is a lot of needless suffering out there because of ignorant medical personnel, and because of the food industry as well. My cupboards are bare now because this website has shown me that everything I had stocked up on is loaded with gluten! But THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU! You are part of the solution!

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    Guest Debbie

    Posted

    It took a foot specialist to figure out I was celiac! Over the past 31 years (and I am only 48) I have been to numerous doctors that told me I had ulcers and IBD, Epstein-Barr (now known as chronic fatigue syndrome), rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, etc. About two years ago, my regular physician found I had a low functioning thyroid and started treatment, and a year later I was placed on anti-depressants. After starting a new job, my feet and hands swelled so badly that I couldn't walk or close my fists. My podiatrist immediately placed me on B12 supplements to help my very irritated nerves and then diagnosed me as celiac. Fortunately, he was very familiar with the disease as he has several siblings with it.

     

    I have looked all over the internet for a listing of no-no foods, and this one is the best. I actually started my new diet only yesterday and look forward to feeling a whole lot better. I honestly don't think it will be that difficult to follow, but I also have the advantage if living in a farm community where I have access to the freshest of everything and have done my own canning and preserving for many years anyhow. This just gives me the incentive to do more of it!

     

    And, I can't imagine that this will be at all bad for my diabetic husband either!

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    Guest Art Fell

    Posted

    For 30 years I have suffered on and off, mostly on, from skipped heartbeats (extra-systoles) - a lot of them, and generally feeling lousy a lot of the time. Dozens of doctor consultations yielded zip over the years. Three months ago, based on a story from another lady who had suffered from gluten sensitivity, my wife suggested I try going gluten free. I did and bingo! The symptoms disappeared. When I started to go gluten free I asked my gastro-intestinal specialist doctor to check me for celiac disease. All the tests came back negative, but I am morally certain they were false negatives. I am feeling 100% better but wondering what to do next. I appreciate this website very much particularly since few doctors (none in my experience to date) seem to know or care about the gluten problem.

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