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The Use of Monoclonal Antibodies to Detect Gluten in Foods

Celiac.com 10/29/2008 - The intestinal inflammation that arises when people with celiac disease consume wheat, rye or barley occurs when HLA-DQ2-restricted CD4+ T-cells recognize peptides derived from gluten in the food. Peptides that stimulate an immune response like this are found in both gliadins and glutenins.

A team of researchers based in the Netherlands recently discovered that particular types of antibodies called monoclonal antibodies react to the presence of gluten proteins in much the same way that the human HLA-DQ2-restricted CD4+ T-cells do, and that monoclonal antibodies offer promise for reliably detecting the presence of wheat, barley, rye, and even oat gluten in food products.

The team was made up of Cristina Mitea, Yvonne Kooy-Winkelaar, Peter van Veelen, Arnoud de Ru, Jan W Drijfhout, Frits Koning and Liesbeth Dekking. They recently set out to assess the specificity of 5 different types of monoclonal antibodies in how they react to T-cell stimulatory peptides found in alpha - and gamma-gliadins and in low- and high-molecular-weight glutenins, and to compare it with the specificity of patient-derived T-cells.

The team assessed the reaction levels of selected monoclonal antibodies with gluten peptides, enzymatic gluten digests, and intact gluten proteins, and compared the results to those for gluten-specific T-cells by using a combination of immunologic and biochemical techniques. They also assessed the reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies with gluten homologues in barley, rye, and oats.

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They found that the specificity of the monoclonal antibodies largely overlaps with that of gluten-specific T-cells. Moreover, monoclonal antibodies detect several distinct homologous peptides present in gluten proteins.

The results showed that monoclonal antibodies that react to the immune-triggering peptides found in both gliadins and glutenins can be used to screen food for the presence of immune-triggering peptides. All monoclonal antibodies, except those that are LMW-specific, also detect storage proteins present in barley and rye, whereas the {gamma} -gliadin-specific monoclonal antibodies also recognize oat proteins.

This discovery could lead to the development of a reliable test for detecting harmful gluten and related proteins and peptides in food products, or for determining if food products labeled as gluten-free were indeed free of gluten.

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 88, No. 4, 1057-1066, October 2008

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2 Responses:

 
Dorothy
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said this on
03 Nov 2008 9:51:07 PM PDT
There is no gluten in oats!
Perhaps the article indicated that proteins are detected, by them, in oats.

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
07 Nov 2008 1:01:14 PM PDT
Dorothy's correct in the strictest sense-they do share a protein. However, commercially available oats and oat products are often contaminated with traces of wheat, rye, or barley, and thus problematic for people with celiac disease. A successful test using this technology offers some promise of a cheap, easy to use means of testing for just such contamination. It is also true that some folks with celiac disease seem to be sensitive to oats, and the common protein would be a logical place to start.




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Ditto. However, this is what I can never understand about gluten free food. (see the bold bits which I've taken from the article) "We wanted to determine if gluten consumption will affect health in people with no apparent medical reasons to avoid gluten. Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more,? I wonder why what so much of what I eat that's gluten free doesn't have added vitamins - we of all people need fortification in our cereals and bread, surely?

Yeah we learned that the hard way. I am inclined to think (as I did initially) that it was JUST the Cheerios but as time is passing and she is not bouncing back I am worried that we need to strip away dairy again for a while.

Oh I have no issue with being dairy free personally but tell that to a 13 year old. We both went gluten-free at the same time and it has been mindlessly easy for me. But I am easy about food and no real food issues. I am far more adaptable. She comes to the table with her own unique set of issues that complicate just easily transitioning to dairy free versions of much loved favorites. To most they are jst that "substitutes" to her they are completely different foods and ones that she has no interest in eating. They don't satisfy her need for XYZ. It is like craving an apple and someone handing you a fish. For her anyway! LOL!

I believe the talk around this forum is that cheerios are not gluten free enough for people with celiac at this time. I don't know if anything has changed on that and when their lawyer calls me I'll quickly delete this. haha

Could be we generally say get off of dairy for a few months when going gluten free. The part of the intestines that produce the enzymes, and help break down dairy are associated with the tips of the villi, which are the most damaged if not gone in celiacs. THIS is why most of us end up with a lactose intolerance early on. And most can introduce it later after healing. As to her symptoms with it there was a bunch of research about dairy permeated the gut and causing neurological issues in a autism study I was looking at years ago. And there have been other studies about damaged intestines and how the hormones in milk can easier effect ones body. Personally I also have a huge grudge against dairy on a personal level as it is not natural to suck on a cows tits and drink the stuff, nor your dogs, nor a rabbits......I mean come on even Human Breast milk you would find odd to drink as an adult right? Back in the past dairy was a great way to get calories and fats when there was famine, etc around I mean it is meant to make a calf grow into a 500+lb cow. But on a genetic and hormonal level it is not really for human consumption and now days the whole corporate BS propaganda push and dairy farms shove that oh its healthy stuff down your throat. There are plenty of dairy free options for everything feel free to message me if you need help finding anything I have been dairy free for over a decade.