No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Gluten-free Wheat? Can New Wheat Hybrids Help Celiac Sufferers?

Celiac.com 07/31/2013 - People with celiac disease react to specific proteins in wheat, and a team of scientists from Washington State University are attempting to develop new varieties of wheat that suppress those proteins and are safe for those with celiac disease.

Photo: CC--mrpbpsCurrently, they can silence nearly 90 percent of the protein that causes a gluten reaction. They hope their research efforts will lead them to a strain that suppress 100% of the proteins that trigger gluten reactions.

Since people with celiac disease react to specific proteins in wheat, the simple solution is to eliminate those proteins to develop an allergy-free wheat.

According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health, wheat is made up of three groups of proteins : gliadins, low molecular weight glutenin subunits and high molecular weight glutenin subunits.

The majority of people with celiac disease can tolerate the high molecular weight glutenin proteins, so the Washington State scientists attempted to silence the genetic expression of the other proteins in wheat.

Ads by Google:

The high molecular weight glutenins are necessary for baking, so the wheat should produce flour suitable for a variety of breads and dough.

The researchers are using a genetic technique called RNA interference, that has enabled them to silence the expression of more than 80 percent of the wheat genes associated with autoimmune reactions.

“With our molecular genetic technologies we have wheat plants that silence 85.6 percent of the immunogenic genes,” said Diter von Wettstein, a plant science professor at Washington State. “The chances of getting plants with more than 90 percent silencing is good.”

Such wheat hybrids might not work for all people with celiac disease, but could they provide benefits for the majority of people with celiac disease?

What do you think? Would you try it? Share your thoughts below.

Read More at Producer.com.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



22 Responses:

 
giulia
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
02 Aug 2013 10:36:15 AM PDT
only nature decides what, and if we can, eat wheat. no man, not even if it is called scientist can create a grain suitable for human beings.

 
DJ
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
05 Aug 2013 6:18:31 AM PDT
I get severe stomach pains and other serious symptoms after eating GM-containing food products, so I don't think I would want to try the wheat if it's been genetically modified. I wouldn't even know if I was reacting to the wheat or the GMO adulteration. Since I don't know why I can't tolerate GM foods, I wouldn't want to take the risk. If the wheat is not GM, I might consider trying it, if it is truly gluten-free.

 
Wilford Diabeeeetus Brimley
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
14 Jul 2014 3:04:59 PM PDT
Obviously, you're not diabetic and forced to use GM products on a daily basis.

 
Patricia Hartner
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
05 Aug 2013 6:56:03 AM PDT
Yes, I would try this.

 
Jackie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
05 Aug 2013 10:00:12 AM PDT
I think they should just forget about it. We don't need wheat.

 
Justin Perkins
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
05 Aug 2013 10:42:54 AM PDT
I would give it a try. I would even beg my folks to grow a bunch of it.

 
linda
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
05 Aug 2013 10:46:57 AM PDT
Quit messing with our food. That's what put us in the muddle of nasty GMO'd foods to start with. We don't need wheat.

 
Christy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
05 Aug 2013 12:35:52 PM PDT
Yes, I would definitely eat it. I've tried every kind of gluten-free bread/pastry/pizza crust out there, even homemade, and nothing compares to the gluten version, unfortunatley. If they can pull it off, my taste buds salute you!!

 
Nancy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
05 Aug 2013 1:50:50 PM PDT
Yes, I would try it and make some sourdough bread, which I have greatly missed.

 
Ruth Grubbs
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
05 Aug 2013 2:41:42 PM PDT
I would be willing to try this wheat.

 
Charlotte Martin
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
05 Aug 2013 3:47:55 PM PDT
I am whole food plant strong in my diet and I love it. The only thing that frustrates me is I cannot eat wheat, barley or rye. The gluten-free breads are so unhealthy that I have just decided to forego eating bread. I would love to try this wheat. The person who said only nature can produce food doesn't realize that man has been manipulating plants for thousands of years... most often for the bad. Our fruits and vegetables have been manipulated to be sweeter, larger, more attractive and non-perishable. How does he think all the California vegetables and fruits end up in our supermarkets? Yes, bring on the gluten-free wheat!

 
Patti D
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
06 Aug 2013 6:33:38 AM PDT
I would be scared to try it. My reaction to gluten is so severe that the sheer pain would keep me from taking the chance. It's not worth it. I don't miss wheat that much and I'm doing fine without it.

 
Sharon Kees
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
06 Aug 2013 8:54:56 AM PDT
I would likely try it, but I would try to be smart about it. I think I would know pretty quickly if it was a problem with me because first my fatigue and joint pain would return, then I would probably have an outbreak of dermatitis herpetiformis. But even without those symptoms, I would want some follow up bloodwork to check my nutrients and my anemia. But would I want to taste really good wheat bread again? YES! So I would try it.

 
Sharon
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
06 Aug 2013 9:04:33 AM PDT
I would absolutely try gluten-free wheat. Since I have silent celiac disease, I couldn't believe I even had celiac disease when I was first diagnosed. Gluten-free food is the pits, especially in the breads and pastas.

 
Sue
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
18 Aug 2013 3:48:06 PM PDT
I definitely would not try it! I really miss all my favorite foods made with wheat, but knowing how sick it makes me and having to take a month or more to recover, no way would I try it or anything else I cannot read all the ingredients and where it was manufactured and the cooking surfaces etc. I would love a resolution to this horrible disease, it is so frustrating almost on a daily basis at work or going out to be able to find something I like to eat that is safe from cross contamination and things that trigger my celiac disease.

 
Carol
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
19 Aug 2013 8:32:04 AM PDT
This is suspect to me. "Such wheat hybrids might not work for all people with celiac disease, but could they provide benefits for the majority of people with celiac disease?"

But I wouldn't knowingly touch a GMO product with a 10-foot pole.

 
Azar
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
06 Oct 2013 8:20:51 AM PDT
Waiting for it, I would definitely eat it...

 
Dolores
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
06 Mar 2014 7:12:43 AM PDT
Yes I would try gluten free wheat. I would try it but I have auto immune diseases so I don't know if it would be okay.

 
Gramma
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
05 Aug 2014 7:43:01 AM PDT
If a person has serious, 'full-blown' celiac they should not try this when alone, and they should have their 'epi' pen nearby. I would try it, but I do not (yet) have true celiac.

I have 'gluten intolerance', and my only symptom so far is EXTREME coughing for several days after eating gluten. I and my doc wonder if my symptoms could progress into full-blown celiac.

I did not start the gluten-induced coughing until I was over 60 and I would appreciate any info from anyone who developed celiac as an adult. Ever heard of gluten-induced extreme coughing as a precursor to celiac? (By extreme coughing, I mean for 2 years I could not even carry on a conversation, till I went off gluten for another reason and like magic, my coughing stopped in about a week!)

 
LiAp
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
05 Oct 2015 12:29:55 PM PDT
Hi - There is no epi pen for celiac - it is not an allergy but an autoimmune disease.

 
Louise
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
26 Oct 2014 12:58:01 PM PDT
I would definitely try this, hurry up!

 
M. Taj
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
04 Nov 2014 12:51:11 AM PDT
I would surely try this wheat. Thanks to the scientists who are putting their effort for the benefit of mankind. I would even like to grow this wheat in my land in Pakistan but I would need about 10 Kg of the seeds. I am a believer of evolution.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

The reason they set the limit at 20ppms is that through scientific study, they have proven that the vast majority of people with Celiac Disease do not have an autoimmune reaction to amounts below that......it is a safe limit for most. Also, just because that limit is set at 20ppms, does not mean that gluten-free products contain that amount of gluten. Testing for lower levels becomes more expensive with each increment down closer to 0-5ppms, which translates into higher priced products. Unless you eat a lot of processed gluten-free food, which can have a cumulative affect for some, most people do well with the 20ppm limit.

I'm in the Houston area so I'm assuming there are plenty of specialists around, though finding one that accepts my insurance might be hard. This might sound dumb, but do I search for a celiac specialist?? I'm so new to this and want to feel confident in what is/isn't wrong with my daughter. I'm with you on trusting the specialist to know the current research.

Hi VB Thats sounds like a good plan. Would it help to know that a frustrating experience in seeking diagnosis isn't unusual With your IGG result I'm sure a part of you is still wondering if they are right to exclude celiac. I know just how you feel as I too had a negative biopsy, but by then a gluten challenge had already established how severely it affected me. So I was convinced I would be found to be celiac and in a funny way disappointed not to get the 'official' stamp of approval. Testing isnt perfect, you've already learned of the incomplete celiac tests offered by some organisations and the biopsy itself can only see so much. If you react positively to the gluten free diet it may mean you're celiac but not yet showing damage in a place they've checked, or it may be that you're non celiac gluten sensitive, which is a label that for a different but perhaps related condition which has only recently been recognised and for which research is still very much underway. We may not be able to say which but the good news is all of your symptoms: were also mine and they all resolved with the gluten free diet. So don't despair, you may still have found your answer, it just may be a bit wordier than celiac! Keep a journal when you're on the diet, it may help you track down your own answers. Best of luck!

Run to the nearest celiac disease specialty center if you can. Especially with conflicting doc opinions. Where do you live? Honestly, I test positive to only the DGP and the newest research on its specificity is a mixed bag. My recent scope did not show "active" celiac disease but only a slight increase in IELs. I am waiting for my post biopsy appointment with the Celiac specialist next month. But I've been through a couple of GI'S locally and honestly I feel it was definitely worth going to a specialist. Especially when you have some positive blood work but a normal biopsy the doctors really go back and Forth on diagnosis and never really know for certain. Unfortunately given the above I just said I probably still do not know for certain. Sigh. But I trust the specialist to be at the top of his game on the research and at least I can feel confident and comfortable in what his opinion may be next month.

That's a great list with such great info! Do you eat at Shucks?