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ogrestrength

Beer

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I drink Amstel Light. I got an email from them (I have since deleted it) stating that their beers are gluten free and they use a different way of processing I guess because it comes from Europe (their gluten standards are different anyway). I know I should be skeptical but I drink it only on occasion and feel fine. I know I know, feeling fine and having "damage" are two different things but my blood test levels remain on the healthy side while partaking in Amstel Light.

Amstel Light is not gluten free.

No one should drink this beer. Gluten Free is Europe does not always mean "Gluten Free".

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Amstel Light is not gluten free.

No one should drink this beer. Gluten Free is Europe does not always mean "Gluten Free".

You are so right, it takes so much longer to diagnose us here in the states that I think the majority of us are just to sensitive for the European standard.

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So sad....sad for you, the guinea pig, and sad for us....I was getting all excited about having a Rolling Rock..... :(

Heck I've already been halfway out the door twice. First for Rolling Rock and then for Amstel. Glad I read the follow up posts!

Tom

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I just called Latrobe Brewing. They confirmed the malt. Curses foiled again!

Tom

But which type of malt do they use?

Erm only wheat, rye and barley rye contain gluten and there is no reason rice or corn malt would contain gluten.

The real danger is if they use corn malt but the supply chain uses a transporter that has contained gluten or other forms of contamination ?

Personally I wouldn't risk it but it depends on the source of the malt ...

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But which type of malt do they use?

Erm only wheat, rye and barley rye contain gluten and there is no reason rice or corn malt would contain gluten.

The real danger is if they use corn malt but the supply chain uses a transporter that has contained gluten or other forms of contamination ?

Personally I wouldn't risk it but it depends on the source of the malt ...

I assume because he told me not to drink it that the malt was barley. I guess someone could try to find out the source of the malt. I don't think I will call again.

Tom

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99 % of beer is made with malted barley.

I used to work in a brewery...

<Sniff Sniff>

Yes but then 99% of 'beer' is also not made of corn and rice. It rather depends on your definition of beer. Several countries have strict laws as to what can be called beer (Austria and Bavaria not technically a country spring to mind)

I would rather suspect that rolling rock doesn't actually know the source of the malt and its likely to be barley but they might also not have considered that they have a huge market if they simply make sure they buy corn or other gluten-free malt. Someone mentioned it tasting like 1/3 Heinekin in water to start with and considering Heinkin is a pretty poor beer to start off with and then the stuff exported to the US is already adjusted to the US mass market is already diluted they have to be dealing with a specialist market to start off...

Its a long time (a few years) since I tasted real beer and probably close on 20 yrs since I had rollingrock but I don't remember it being particuarly bad ... (in terms of commerical beer) and I would certainly jump at it in a flash if available and gluten-free.

Its rather curious that I was never a big fan of beer until I couldn't have it and enjoyed the odd cider in the summer. Now Im relegated to cider I really detest the stuff, I can't drink enough to actually have a night out with the guys without seriously messing up my guts the next day.

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I think that beer has to contain barley malt in the US in order to be called 'beer'. Most brewers of American-style beer use part corn sugar and rice because it's cheaper than barley malt and makes a lighter-flavored and colored beer. If a beer has wheat in it it will be labeled "wheat beer" or "weisbeer", which is a specialty beer type. Types of malt are not interchangeable as far as the end product is concerned.

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Ramapo Valley (East Coast)

New Grist (East Coast)

La Messagere (Canadian)

Bi-Aglut (Italian)

Bards Tale (West Coast, but currently unavailable)

(Those are the ones I know of, at the moment. Since I'm in the midst of looking into this subject. :-D )

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Guest BERNESES
Jeff,

Try the Ramapo again with a lemon wedge in it. I think that improves it a lot. DOn't waste the 12 pack - too damn expensive.

Oh thank you thank you thank you- I have 10 of 12 left and I really didn't want to drink them because they are so sweet! But maybe this will help.

I miss Bard's Tale. What I wouldn't do for an amber beer. Ohhhhhh.....................sigh

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for those of you who have tried all (or any) of the beers, can you say what other brands they might taste like? i want to order some, but would like a general idea, if possible!

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I was in the supermarket the other day and just out of curiosity had a look at an Amstel Lite bottle... second ingredient was barley malt. Just FYI. Of course it might not be the same stuff they sell over there in the states... :)

Pauliina

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