Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Marlene

Enterolab Results Are In

Recommended Posts

Well, it's official. According to my Enterolab results, I tested positive for gluten sensitivity. Also for casein (more on that later... boo - hoo). My question is regarding Antitissue Transglutaminase. My results says "You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten insensitivity." I have no idea what this means. Any ideas?

Also, I do not have the genes for Celiac, however I have 2 of the genes for gluten sensitivity

(HLA-DQ 3,1 Subtype 9,6). Apparently having 2 genes means you have a stronger reaction to gluten, right?

Getting back to casein, I thought I was just lactose intolerant and was hoping this would get better once my body healed (I have been gluten free for about 12 weeks now) and am feeling pretty low that it's actually casein which is the problem. This means that I will never be able to have dairy again, right? Can't even think about that right now. Once I do start thinking about it, is there a good website to find out more about the Gluten-free Casein-free diet?

I am looking forward to hearing what some of you experienced gluten free, extremely helpful people have to say about all this. I still feel like a newbie and am still going through the "grieving stage" regarding no gluten. I always loved my fresh baked breads, rolls, donuts, soft & chewy cookies, -- OK, I am going to stop now and try to think about all the good things I CAN eat. (Nope, not working right now.. sigh.)

Thanks, guys!!

Marlene

(43 year old happily married mother of 4 between the ages of 11 and 19.

Gluten free since July 1, 2006 after searching for answers for years.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Marlene,

I'm also 43 and the mother of six! We have a lot in common! I also have 2 gluten intolerant genes and casein intolerance. Casein is for life just like gluten.

The Ttg is the autoimmune reaction. That means your body not only has an immune reaction, but you also have an autoimmune reaction that does actual damage to your body.

For casein replacement -- I use Vance's Dari-free for milk and cream. I use Ghee when I want real butter as it is real butter that is clarified, so the casein is removed. I mostly use coconut oil or olive oil.

It's easiest to start with what you can have instead of what you can't have. You can have meat, chicken, fish, eggs, fruit, vegetables, rice and potatoes. Tinkyada makes a good rice pasta. So, you really have everything you need available! If you really like a certain food item, you can look for a gluten-free replacement. You will feel better and heal faster if you stick to the whole foods rather than processed foods. Also, get lots of rest.

Welcome! It will get easier as you get used to it. Feeling better is the motivation for staying on the diet!


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carla already answered most of your questions.

I am gluten free/soy free and dairy free. I am not intolerant to dairy though, just allergic. Allergic and intolerant to gluten and soy.

I use cashews for cheese sauce. Very good and I'd be glad to post the recipes I use most for you. I also have recipes for mayonnaise with cashews or almonds if you don't use store bought mayo for whatever reason.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use cashews for cheese sauce. Very good and I'd be glad to post the recipes I use most for you. I also have recipes for mayonnaise with cashews or almonds if you don't use store bought mayo for whatever reason.

I would love to see those recipes myself!


Toni

Casein free since June 2006.

Gluten free since August 2006

Egg and Soy free since October 2006.

Diagnosis of IBS May 2006.

Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia September 2006.

Negative biopsy and blood tests.

EnterLab results:

Gluten intolerance

Egg intolerance

Soy intolerance

HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,5) which means I have one celiac gene and one sensitivity gene.

Mother of three special boys. (and not just because of their dx's)

Married 13 years to a guy who wishes we weren't all so "special!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sliceable Cashew Cheese From Five Loaves Deli & Bakery by Neva Brackett

2 cups cashew nuts

3/8 cup emes kosher gel (I’m sure regular gelatin would work)

1 ½ cups boiling water

2 Tbs. Lemon juice

2 Tbs. Yeast flakes (nutritional)

1 Tbs. Salt

1 tsp. Onion powder

½ tsp. Garlic powder

1 Cup Cold water

1. Place all ingredients in the blender except the 1 cup cold water. Turn on and blend for 1 or 2 minutes until very smooth.

Hint: Place a towel over the lid of the blender before turning on. Hot liquids tend to splash out.

2. Add 1 cup cold water, blend briefly and pour into containers of your choice to chill and slice when firm.

Hint: This recipe makes a white cheese resembling Jack cheese. If you want half of it to resemble American cheese in color, pour half of it into a 1 pint mold and blend in ¼ cup pimientos and 1 tsp. paprika to the remainder. This can be frozen, so you might want to make a double recipe and keep it handy for future use, Frozen Cashew Cheese shreds very nicely if you do it while still frozen, and makes a great topping for Pizza. To thaw, set out at room temperature for an hour. Don’t try to thaw it in the microwave--it will melt and not be sliceable.

Prep time: 15 min Chill time: 4 hr or overnight.

Cashew Pimento Cheese (for pizza) From Cooking by the Book by Marcella Lynch

½ c water

½ c cashews

½ tsp. salt

2 tbs. oil

2 ½ tbs. lemon juice

1 4oz jar pimentos

½ tsp. onion salt

½ tsp. garlic salt

1 ½ tbs. nutritional yeast flakes

Whiz all ingredients together in blender until smooth. Drizzle over pizza before baking.

Melted Cheese Sauce (I use with Sliceable cheese w/o gel for mac & cheese)

From Newstart Lifestyle Cookbook by Weimar Institute

2 cups water

¼ cup clean, raw cashews

4 ounce jar pimentos

3 tbs. food yeast flakes

2 tbs. cornstarch or arrowroot

1 tbs. fresh lemon juice

1 ½ tsp. salt

½ tsp. onion flakes or powder

¼ tsp. garlic powder

Process cashews in about ½ cup of the water in a blender until very smooth. Add remaining water and other ingredients and continue blending until very smooth. Simmer in a heavy saucepan until thickened, stirring constantly (5-6 minutes). Pour over vegetables, potatoes, tortilla chips etc.

Variations: for Cheese Fondue or Cheese Spread increase cornstarch or arrowroot to 3 tablespoons.

Nacho Cheese Sauce (also from Newstart)

1 cup clean, raw cashews

1 cup hot water

2 ounce jar pimentos

1 tbs. fresh lemon juice

1 tsp. onion powder

1 tsp. salt

½ tsp. garlic powder

½ tsp. paprika

Chili powder to taste

Process cashews and hot water in a blender until very smooth. Add remaining ingredients and continue blending until very smooth. Pour into saucepan and heat over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until thickened. Serve over chips, if desired.

The first two recipes are from Five Loaves Deli and Bakery by Neva Brackett.

Ranch-style

1 cup tofu or cashew mayonnaise (I'm sure you could use regular)

1/4 c water

1 Tbs. lemon juice

1/4 tsp celery salt

1 tsp onion powder

1/2 tsp parsley

1/4 tsp poppy seed

1/4 tsp dill weed

3/4 tsp salt

1/8 tsp garlic powder

1/8 tsp sweet basil

Place mayo in a bowl and stirr in the remaining ingredients.

The next recipe is from Cooking by the Book by Marcella Lynch

Hidden Valley Ranch Dressing

1 c buttermilk (use replacement milk with 2 tsp lemon juice to sour)

1 c mayonnaise

1/4 c lemon juice

1 tsp onion salt

1/2 tsp garlic salt

1 Tbs food yeast flakes

1 tsp sweet basil

1/4 tsp dill weed

Other herbs as desired to season

Mix and let stand 15 minutes to develop flavors.

Instant Mayonnaise

1 c water (purified or distilled

1/2 c soy milk powder

1/2 tsp salt

2 to 3 Tbsp fresh lemon juice

*2 Tbsp instant clear jel

Optional Ingredients:

1 to 2 Tbsp oil

dash or two homemade curry powder

(1 Tbsp each of tumeric, cumin, coriander, garlic powder)

Dill Weed, onion and garlic powder

WHIZ all ingredients in blender, adding Clear Gel last. Blend until smooth. Store in refrigerator 1 1/2 - 2 weeks. Purified water is bacteria-free; therefore the mayonnaise will keep fresh longer. YIELD: 1 1/2 cups Calories: 10/Tbsp. *Instant Clear Gel is a precooked cornstarch product available from bakery wholesalers. It is great for making instant jams and pie fillings with fruit juices and for thickening salad dressings without oil.

Cashew Mayonnaise

1 1/4 c boiling water

3/4 c raw cashews

1 Tbsp honey

1 tsp salt

3 to 4 Tbsp Lemon Juice

WHIZ in blender until creamy-smooth all ingredients except lemon juice. Briefly whiz lemon juice in last NOTE: Adding boiling water cooks cashews somewhat, giving them more thickening properties, so fewer cashews can be used and the mayonnaise does not separate. Calories: 16 per Tbsp. YIELD: 2 cups mayonnaise.

Cashew Mayonnaise

1/2 c cashew nuts

1 3/4 c water

2 Tbsp cornstarch (or arrowroot)

2 tsp salt

1 Tbsp onion powder

2 Tbsp lemon juice

3 Tbsp honey

1 Tbsp orange juice conc.

1. Blend all ingredients together for about 2 minutes.

2. Place blended mix in a saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring constantly with a wire whip.

3. Remove from heat and cool before serving.

Hint: Pour boiling hot Mayonnaise into a hot, sterilized jar and screw on a sealing lid. Let is cool and check seal--a handy way to preserve for traveling. A little jam jar is just right!

Makes 2 cups. Calories per Tbsp/ 11

Almond Mayonnaise

2 c water

1/2 c blanched almonds*

3 1/2 Tbsp Instant Clear Jel

1/2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice

1/2 tsp onion powder

1/2 tsp salt

1/8 tsp garlic powder

Process water and almonds in a blender until very smooth. Strain and save liquid (use pulp in patties or waffles, etc.). Process liquid and remaining ingredients until thickened. Add dill or tumeric, to taste, if desired. Yields 2 cups or 32 servings

*boil raw almonds in water for 1 minute. Drain and cool, then pinch off skins.

Marvi-whip Mayonnaise

2 c soft tofu

2 Tbsp Nutritional yeast flakes

1 tsp salt

1/4 c lemon juice

1 tsp onion powder

1/2 tsp garlic powder or 1 clove fresh

1/3 c olive oil or raw cashews

1/4 c water, if using cashews in place of oil.

Blend until very smooth and creamy.

To make a creamy Italian dressing, just add 1/2 tsp each of dill weed, basil, and Italian seasoning.

For a tangy dip or salad dressing, add 1 tsp dill weed.

Chill and serve.

Recipe for butter from Ten Talents by Rosalie Hurd

Into the blender put:

1/2 cup water

1/2 cup carrot juice

OR 1 cup water & carotene

Add.

2 Tbs Powdered soy milk (I omit this)

1 tsp salt

1 Tbs. Coconut meal (Optional) (I don't use this either)

Blend well then add slowly while blending:

1/2 cup soy or safflower oil (I use grapeseed)

Last blend in just to thicken:

1/2 cup coconut oil + 1-2 Tbs liquid lecithin (I don't use, I increase the coconut oil)

Pour into container(s) and chill to get hard. Keep refrigerated.

I'll post these in the recipes section also so others that want some ideas have them. :)

EDITED: to fix the buttermilk. I've posted these for various people. Corrected for dairy substitution.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, YUM! Thanks, Andrea!

Any ideas for an alfredo type sauce? American cheese (slices for sandwiches)?

I can look for your answer in the recipes section so as not to further hijack this thread. :D


Toni

Casein free since June 2006.

Gluten free since August 2006

Egg and Soy free since October 2006.

Diagnosis of IBS May 2006.

Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia September 2006.

Negative biopsy and blood tests.

EnterLab results:

Gluten intolerance

Egg intolerance

Soy intolerance

HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,5) which means I have one celiac gene and one sensitivity gene.

Mother of three special boys. (and not just because of their dx's)

Married 13 years to a guy who wishes we weren't all so "special!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The alfredo recipe I had used a lot of tofu products including tofutti sour cream.

Didn't I read somewhere that that is not gluten free.

I could try to remember it. I just sold the cookbook it was in.

It used soymilk, soy sour cream, soy parmesan and soy butter.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll have to try that with another kind of milk, as I think the soy milk was making me sick.

Thanks, anyway!


Toni

Casein free since June 2006.

Gluten free since August 2006

Egg and Soy free since October 2006.

Diagnosis of IBS May 2006.

Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia September 2006.

Negative biopsy and blood tests.

EnterLab results:

Gluten intolerance

Egg intolerance

Soy intolerance

HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,5) which means I have one celiac gene and one sensitivity gene.

Mother of three special boys. (and not just because of their dx's)

Married 13 years to a guy who wishes we weren't all so "special!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there. Thanks a lot for taking the time to answer my questions. Carla, it sure sounds like we have a lot in common! I live in Brantford, Ontario. It would be great if you lived close by but I guess that is hoping for too much. Do you live in the States? (You don't have to answer that if you don't want.) Andrea, thanks a lot for the great recipes. I will definitely be making some of those cheese recipes when I can find the time. I work full-time which is one of my biggest obstacle to cooking more gluten free recipes from scratch. Usually on the weekend I will try to make a pot of something and then I freeze it in one serving containers. This means that I end up eating the same thing over and over. I really need to get out of that rut. What is the easiest way to copy those recipes? I don't want to end up printing off the whole thread. My husband suggested copy and paste into Microsoft Word. (I work on a computer every day at my job, you would think I know this stuff!!) thanks!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always copy and paste the recipes I want. :)


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I live in the States, near Cincinnati, Ohio.

Cooking gluten-free for a big family can be a challenge, even without a full-time job outside the home! I usually make something that can be cooked either in a pot or a large frying pan (I have a very-well seasoned, gluten-free cast iron skillet). In the skillet, I just throw in olive oil and whatever ingredient takes the longest to cook first (usually the meat -- either chicken cut up or ground buffalo/ostrich/beef) then add the veggies. Sometime I'll cook potatoes in with the meat, sometimes rice in my rice steamer.

I also make lots of big pots of soup in the winter.

In the summer, we cook out a lot (watch the charcoal, you need to use natural charcoal as manufactured charcoal has wheat).


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites