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zachsmom

Yeast........ Is Yeast A No No

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Okay ... I saw something today ...( Bobs red mill has 20 parts per 1 million ) of gluten... I guess I dont know to cry .. or throw it away... will it make the baby vomit? But any way ...

Will yeast cause a problem... He has a recipie for something that has yeast in it...

But I guess that no flour is going to be whole gluten free due to the packaging and usa regulations...

So does that mean that all the flours that say gluten free will make you sick.

HUMMMMMMM

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yeast is not a problem.


Christine

15 year old twins with celiac, diagnosed dec. 2005

11 year old daughter with celiac diagnosed dec 2005

17 year old son with celiac gene

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Okay ... I saw something today ...( Bobs red mill has 20 parts per 1 million ) of gluten... I guess I dont know to cry .. or throw it away... will it make the baby vomit? But any way ...

Will yeast cause a problem... He has a recipie for something that has yeast in it...

But I guess that no flour is going to be whole gluten free due to the packaging and usa regulations...

So does that mean that all the flours that say gluten free will make you sick.

HUMMMMMMM

Well, that is interesting, it says its totally gluten free....where does it say 20 parts per 1 million? I use their bread mix and baking mix all the time but haven't ever seen anything about "any" gluten in it at all....sure would like to know where that is....

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I'm not sure about the 20ppm, but I do know that Bob's Red Mill has a separate manufacturing facility for their gluten-free flours. If it says gluten-free on the package, it's made in this facility. This is the reason that their soy flour (I think it's the soy flour) doesn't say gluten-free. Although it likely is gluten-free, it's made in the same facility as other gluten products.

Most research shows that a certain amount of gluten will not cause damage. It is in the ppm range. In countries like England that have gluten labeling laws, gluten-free products are tested and have to be under this specified ppm gluten. Of course, I can't remember what the number is right now. In theory this works well. My issue is that what if I eat several things that are all under the limit and the ppm add up to be over the limit? I don't know, it's a tough one. If the flour says gluten-free, I would eat it. If it's been tested to be below a certain ppm I guess I have to go with that. There's no way they can test for zero ppm, so this is the next best thing I guess.


Gluten-Free since September 15, 2005.

Peanut-Free since July 2006.

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I'm not sure about the 20ppm, but I do know that Bob's Red Mill has a separate manufacturing facility for their gluten-free flours. If it says gluten-free on the package, it's made in this facility. This is the reason that their soy flour (I think it's the soy flour) doesn't say gluten-free. Although it likely is gluten-free, it's made in the same facility as other gluten products.

Most research shows that a certain amount of gluten will not cause damage. It is in the ppm range. In countries like England that have gluten labeling laws, gluten-free products are tested and have to be under this specified ppm gluten. Of course, I can't remember what the number is right now. In theory this works well. My issue is that what if I eat several things that are all under the limit and the ppm add up to be over the limit? I don't know, it's a tough one. If the flour says gluten-free, I would eat it. If it's been tested to be below a certain ppm I guess I have to go with that. There's no way they can test for zero ppm, so this is the next best thing I guess.

I am not convinced about ..... Bobs red mill .. In the video on the web site VISIT THE MILL ... ... they said that they wash the equiptment after each use and that there gluten is 20 parts per million... I somehow got stuck watching the video .. I was kinda curious... and the way they made it sound was that they didnt have a seperate facility only they stuck to the ELISA GLUTEN ASSAY TEST, But I noticed that they had cloth bags over the distubution hose to put the grains in the grindeing mill ... to keep the hulls and stuff from flying about... But if you say they have a seperate site... I believe you but the video and the web site are confusing when it comes to this fact... they make me feel like they use the gluten standards and wash the equiptment after the wheat goes through .... how else would you even get wheat inthe product in the first place... if they were in a non wheat facility .. the 20 parts per million wouldnt be a problem because it wouldnt exist.... there would be NO wheat ... to count... but they are counting wheat... so .. that makes me think... But like I said if you have seen it I believe it... I get what you mean about if you eat enough ppm you may get ill . that makes so much sense. thaks ... ( I hope you understand what I meant. I in no way am saying your facts are not true... okay I would never be mean .. the web iste is hard to deciper) thanks chris

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I'm not sure about the 20ppm, but I do know that Bob's Red Mill has a separate manufacturing facility for their gluten-free flours. If it says gluten-free on the package, it's made in this facility. This is the reason that their soy flour (I think it's the soy flour) doesn't say gluten-free. Although it likely is gluten-free, it's made in the same facility as other gluten products.

just to add, their cornmeal and carob powder are NOT gluten-free, also!


Gluten-free, Vegan

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Most research shows that a certain amount of gluten will not cause damage. It is in the ppm range. In countries like England that have gluten labeling laws, gluten-free products are tested and have to be under this specified ppm gluten. Of course, I can't remember what the number is right now. In theory this works well. My issue is that what if I eat several things that are all under the limit and the ppm add up to be over the limit? I don't know, it's a tough one. If the flour says gluten-free, I would eat it. If it's been tested to be below a certain ppm I guess I have to go with that. There's no way they can test for zero ppm, so this is the next best thing I guess.

I agree. I use Bob's stuff all of the time and we've never had an issue. There has not been a limit set here, so they are doing the best they can to keep it safe. I've called them multiple times and feel assured by their customer service. It's hard with this lifestyle to feel safe about anything... we've all been "glutened" on accident before, but I've never had an issue with Bob's and you have to trust someone eventually. I just don't think they would work so hard to lie to us like some of the bigger companies.

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