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munkee41182

Bread Makers

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I'm looking into buying a breadmaker to make my gluten-free breads.....I'm a little too lazy to make bread the real way (kneeding, etc) and I was curious as to who makes their breads in their Breadmaker? Which one do you have and does it have a gluten-free setting?

Thank you...

Missing bread in Massachusetts B)


Jami

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I purchased the Sunbeam 5891 2-Pound Programmable Breadmaker. It doesn't have a programmable function but it has 10 pre-set programs. The basic setting does a great job using the Pamela's Wheat-free bread mix. I've had less success with the gluten-free pantry mixes but suspect that I could get those by using the feature to add or reduce cycle time.

This breadmaker is about 1/4 the cost of the Zojirushi BBCCX20 Home Bakery Supreme Bread Machine that is frequently recommended on this site. That one is truely programmable and has specific gluten-free settings I think.

Bottom line for me is that it makes the bread I like for a small fraction of the price.

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I have a Zojirushi, but I have to admit I have not used it for gluten-free bread. It just happened to be the one that I already had. I'll be interested to hear how it's worked for others. It is programmable, but I just find it easier to mix my bread and put it in the oven. I've been busy running around with the kids lately which makes finding the time for making bread more challenging so maybe it's time to start using it...

What appealed to me about in the first place was the ability to program it and that it makes a loaf of bread that looks like a real loaf.

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i recently got the zojirushi with some saved up Amazon certificates (i have an amazon visa, it's awesome i've gotta say). i really love how it has the two paddles to mix well and the programmability. i really like not having to pull out the stand mixer and all that and get the dough from the mixer to the bread pan (it's so sticky and gloppy) and heat up the house with the oven etc. i've really liked the bread from the bread machine so far and have had better luck with getting a decent sized loaf and such. also, the holes from the paddles really aren't big at all compared to an old bread machine i had several years ago. granted, this machine is far more expensive than most (which is why i waited until i'd accrued enough points) but i think it's worth it if you want to save up and wait to get it or bite the bullet and buy it now. or there are more inexpensive machines that also have programmability or gluten-free settings, do a search for "gluten-free bread machine" on Amazon and you should find a few.

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I have a Zo like the two posts before me & I use it all the time ... It is pricey but it is the best. the motor is a workhorse & the quick wheat setting works great for gluten-free ... Many swear by this machine.....

mamaw

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I have a breadman got it at fred meyers seems to work pretty good and has a gluten free setting

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I have the Zo. Mine has a browning problem which the manufacturer has not been able to fix, nor will they exchange. They sent it back to me with instructions to use the dark settings only, as that is the only way my bread will brown on the top. With the price I paid for this, I am rather disappointed in the customer service.

Other than the browning issue, I like the bread machine. I don't know that it is worth the extra dollars though. Lots of people are just as happy with a less expensive machine. I do like the ease of use for the gluten free breads, once you get it set. It is a little difficult to set the homemade settings initially, but once that is done, you only have to push a few buttons.

I think many people are happy with the Breadman that has a gluten free setting. I always search the internet for reviews on things before I buy.

There are several threads about breadmachines on this site.


Positive Bloodwork January 2007

Positive Biopsy Feb. 2007

Gluten Free since January 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,9)

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How did you set your homemade settings? I just recieved my Zo and I am not sure how to set the homemade options. From my understandings gluten-free bread doesn't need to rise two times but I am having trouble figuring this out.

Veronica

first time to make gluten-free bread

I have the Zo. Mine has a browning problem which the manufacturer has not been able to fix, nor will they exchange. They sent it back to me with instructions to use the dark settings only, as that is the only way my bread will brown on the top. With the price I paid for this, I am rather disappointed in the customer service.

Other than the browning issue, I like the bread machine. I don't know that it is worth the extra dollars though. Lots of people are just as happy with a less expensive machine. I do like the ease of use for the gluten free breads, once you get it set. It is a little difficult to set the homemade settings initially, but once that is done, you only have to push a few buttons.

I think many people are happy with the Breadman that has a gluten free setting. I always search the internet for reviews on things before I buy.

There are several threads about breadmachines on this site.

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Is it necessary to have a gluten free setting if you will only use the bread machine for the dough making and not the baking, I perfer to cook my bread in the oven, it is a better shaped loaf that way.


May 2007 - Emily went dairy free

April 2008 - took her back to pedi - she was getting worse

April 24, 2008 - first consult with Pedi gastro specialist

May 5, 2008 - doctor's office called with blood test results - Celiac levels highly elevated

June 9, 2008 - Emily's endoscopy

June 11, 2008 - doctor's office called with Emily's Celiac diagnoses, she has it

So now our new life begins, and hopefully that will be a happier, healthier life for her! I am glad I followed that little maternal instinct telling me something wasn't right!

Here's my little sweetheart:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v104/you...pictures018.jpg

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Emilysmomma, no you don't need a special gluten-free setting if you're just doing the dough.

Urbancowboy, for the homemade setting you would scroll through the options with the "select course" button until the little arrow is pointing at the homemade cycle then use the "cycle" button to scroll through the different parts of the cycle (preheat, knead, rise 1, 2 and 3, bake and cool down), use the "time" button next to the "cycle" button to add time to whatever function you want. I think everything is off on homemade setting when you first use it so you'll want to leave rise 1 and 2 off because only one rise is needed, I use rise 3. I leave the preheat and cool down off as well and just make sure my liquid is warm when I put it in the machine so the bread rises better. I do about 25 minutes for the kneading, a little more than an hour for the rising if I'm using regular yeast and about 45 minutes if it's fast-rise yeast, and then baking is about an hour for me. I do the dark crust setting which really isn't dark at all, you have to press the "start" button after setting everything else before it will switch over and let you choose a crust setting and then you press "start" again to start the machine. I've used their gluten-free brown rice bread recipe that comes in the manual with great results, I don't do all brown rice flour though, I do part brown rice, part sorghum, part millet, part white rice and then the starches as they are called for. I also add some flax meal for extra fiber. I hope this helps, it was a little confusing when I first got mine too.

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