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LuvMoosic4life

Has Anyone Done This?

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Since I've been gluten-free, a few of my family members who are really into cooking and baking want to make gluten-free food for me. Although they have good intentions, I'm sure they arent aware of the CC issue, and even if they are the chance of CC is very likely since they bake and cook with gluten food in thier kitchens all the time.

I was thinking of typing up just a 1 to 2 page info sheet about celiacs/gluten intolerance and explaining the precautions /things to know before baking or cooking for celiacs. I figure I can hand it out to my family members before they try to make something for me. :lol:

I know my aunt has talked about making cookies for me, but I would hate for her to make them w/o prior gluten-free baking knowledge b/c I would feel bad declining eating them in fear of cc. Or worse, eating them and having a reaction. My reactions arent always horrible, it depends, sometimes I have no reaction, but I just choose to stay completely away from gluten, the results have been amazing, I'm so grateful I found out about all of this...

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Since I've been gluten-free, a few of my family members who are really into cooking and baking want to make gluten-free food for me. Although they have good intentions, I'm sure they arent aware of the CC issue, and even if they are the chance of CC is very likely since they bake and cook with gluten food in thier kitchens all the time.

I was thinking of typing up just a 1 to 2 page info sheet about celiacs/gluten intolerance and explaining the precautions /things to know before baking or cooking for celiacs. I figure I can hand it out to my family members before they try to make something for me. :lol:

I know my aunt has talked about making cookies for me, but I would hate for her to make them w/o prior gluten-free baking knowledge b/c I would feel bad declining eating them in fear of cc. Or worse, eating them and having a reaction. My reactions arent always horrible, it depends, sometimes I have no reaction, but I just choose to stay completely away from gluten, the results have been amazing, I'm so grateful I found out about all of this...

Check out this thread. There is a pretty good list there! :P

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?showtopic=48325


Sandi ~ learning to live in a world obsessed and infested with wheat.

"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" probably was not referring to us . . .

"For the love of money gluten is a root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs." (apologies to 1 Timothy 6:10 (NASB)

The person we most dislike is still a soul for whom Christ died. (David Jeremiah)

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It's hard to say no when they have such good intentions, isn't it? But I always turn it down as nicely as I can and explain that it's such a specialized way of eating that it takes a specially prepared kitchen to avoid hurting you. Explain that even their favorite wooden spoon can hurt you if they stir that gluten-free brownie mix with it, or if they used the same spoon to scoop sugar after using it in flour a long time ago that the tiny bits of flour left in that sugar can hurt you. My sister made potato salad with perfectly gluten-free ingredients, but her mayo jar had been used for family sandwiches and sure enough it got me. Tell them how much you appreciate the thought, and would LOVE to be able to say yes, but your insides have taken a beating and you just can't take that chance. Tell them, if they are determined to treat you somehow, that you'll eat any packaged food that is labeled "gluten-free", or suggest something that you know is gluten-free like a specific type of ice cream or a chocolate bar.

So yes, you might want to give them an info sheet, but don't expect them to fully read/understand/believe it. Be kind to them and accept what you can from them and give them suggestions so that they can continue to feel they are doing something nice for you, even if it isn't home cooking. They mean well, but they don't have to suffer your symptoms.


Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

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It's hard to say no when they have such good intentions, isn't it? But I always turn it down as nicely as I can and explain that it's such a specialized way of eating that it takes a specially prepared kitchen to avoid hurting you. Explain that even their favorite wooden spoon can hurt you if they stir that gluten-free brownie mix with it, or if they used the same spoon to scoop sugar after using it in flour a long time ago that the tiny bits of flour left in that sugar can hurt you. My sister made potato salad with perfectly gluten-free ingredients, but her mayo jar had been used for family sandwiches and sure enough it got me. Tell them how much you appreciate the thought, and would LOVE to be able to say yes, but your insides have taken a beating and you just can't take that chance. Tell them, if they are determined to treat you somehow, that you'll eat any packaged food that is labeled "gluten-free", or suggest something that you know is gluten-free like a specific type of ice cream or a chocolate bar.

So yes, you might want to give them an info sheet, but don't expect them to fully read/understand/believe it. Be kind to them and accept what you can from them and give them suggestions so that they can continue to feel they are doing something nice for you, even if it isn't home cooking. They mean well, but they don't have to suffer your symptoms.

thats so true. I know they still wont completely understand it,and it's a bumber :( but at least I am spreading awareness :)

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I haven't done it.

My family would feel free to make substitutions. "I don't know where to buy Bob's oats, these here in the bulk bin will work the same."

or then there is the aunt who gets her nose out of joint "What!?! You are saying that I don't clean my utensils good enough for you?!? I take great care in cleaning my highly porous flour utensil. It will be clean enough for the gluten flour too!!".

Between clueless and insulted I'd have them all mad. Thankfully one of our professionals said "you may not eat anything you did not prepare or open at certain functions".


Shellfish free since 1980

Milk free (all forms) since 1991

Feingold in 2003

First gluten-free round 2007

Now entering full time Gluten free, egg free, almond/peanut free

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I agree with the others--no matter how carefully you would write it, first you can't depend on people reading it correctly--that's just the way people are. Secondly, you can't ever be completely sure they didn't cut corners (or forget) somewhere along the line.

Just today at the family reunion, a relative was happy because she thought we might be able to eat her pie. I was very confused. "Well...that's a wheat-flour crust, right?" Her reply was "Yes, but can't you just scrape it off--the filling is gluten free." :o

So eventually, everyone will learn how it really is for us, one incident at a time. I just lightly exclaimed, "Oh my, no! Even a crumb would be harmful. Even your pan and utensils, if they've been used for wheat before this, could contain trace amounts of gluten."

This seemed to immediately help her understand, without a lot of explantion.


Gaye of PA

Newly diagnosed gluten intolerant in February 2008

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I've considered doing this a number of times for my dad and stepmother. The first year I had to stop my stepmother as she was about to put Wondra on my separate piece of chicken. She gets it now, but we pretty much just get into the habit of going to restaurants, or eating holiday dinners with my mom then going to their house for dessert.

My mother seems to do ok- she calls me when she's at the grocery store, and she plans meals ahead when both my brother and I are coming down. (He's gluten-free as well.) She's no stranger to allergies and cooking though- her bf has a bad egg allergy.


Gluten free since Feb 2006, Dairy and Soy free since 2009

Anemic off and on since 2003

Negative tTG Ab, IgA, Gliadin Ab IgA, wheat allergy (IgE) blood tests (Feb 2006)

Positive wheat allergy skin test(Apr 2006)and dietary response (Feb 2006)

Celiac grandmother (Dx in 1940s, "grew out of it")

Training for my first triathlon to support the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America.

~Amy

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Since I've been gluten-free, a few of my family members who are really into cooking and baking want to make gluten-free food for me. Although they have good intentions, I'm sure they arent aware of the CC issue, and even if they are the chance of CC is very likely since they bake and cook with gluten food in thier kitchens all the time.

I was thinking of typing up just a 1 to 2 page info sheet about celiacs/gluten intolerance and explaining the precautions /things to know before baking or cooking for celiacs. I figure I can hand it out to my family members before they try to make something for me. :lol:

I know my aunt has talked about making cookies for me, but I would hate for her to make them w/o prior gluten-free baking knowledge b/c I would feel bad declining eating them in fear of cc. Or worse, eating them and having a reaction. My reactions arent always horrible, it depends, sometimes I have no reaction, but I just choose to stay completely away from gluten, the results have been amazing, I'm so grateful I found out about all of this...

A woman from the Delphi Celiac Forum has just done this recently. Here is what she has written:

There are long lists of ingredients that are allowed and those that are not allowed on a gluten-free diet. In reality, since the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA), took effect in January 2006, label reading is simple. FALCPA requires that wheat always be labeled clearly, but it does not cover barley, rye, or oats.

This document discusses products that would be gluten free in ingredients, and does not speak to the potential of contamination with gluten grains during processing and manufacturing. If you are concerned about potential manufacturing contamination, contact the company for more information on their manufacturing practices. When in doubt, call the company or do not use the product.

For all meat and poultry products: any plant protein (wheat, barley, rye) will be listed. Meat and poultry are regulated by the USDA, and on 1, 1990, FSIS published the final rule, Ingredients That May Be Designated as Natural Flavors, Natural Flavorings, Flavors, or Flavorings When Used in Meat or Poultry Products. The rule stated that any plant protein that was added to a product must be listed. Therefore, for any meat product, read the label, and if the words

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I just tell friends and relatives "Don't even THINK about trying to cook for me - "

I tend to my own food--- and as much as possible don't even talk about it . If someone says anything, I just say, I'm allergic to wheat (which I am )---- and change the subject . Not gonna live my life around food issues. :)


CeeCee

Allergic to: wheat, peanuts and Penicillin

1995 severe anaphylactic reaction to Wheat

Gluten free since Sept. 2006

"Failure is only the opportunity to begin again, more intelligently"--- Henry Ford

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6. Beer---beer is made with barley and should be avoided

Beer is made with barley, and therefore not safe on a gluten-free diet. If a product is made with gluten free beer, it would be safe, but as of June 2008, I've never encountered a commercially available product made with gluten-free beer.

RedBridge is a sorghum based beer and they have it at supermarkets that have a gluten free section ie red meyers, yolks, market of choice, whole foods, trader joes, also albertsons, wal-mart


Whole family is allergic to Gluten, eggs, dairy, most are allergic to garlic. Few other various allergies.

Did you know it's best to wait until 21 months to give a baby wheat??

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