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BHJmom

New To This.... Help!

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Hello everyone... I am so thankful to see a board like this because I am LOST!

I am a 35 year old mother of 3 and wife of one! I have had digestive issues most of my life. It used to be "C" and now has changed to "D". I had my gallbladder removed in 2006 and then in 2007 was told I have Crohns disease in my small intestine. Never made sense to me since I am overweight (and most Crohns patients LOS weight) and I don't run to the bathroom dozens of times a day (sometimes I go days without going at all).

So, I basically ignored the diagnosis and switched docs. Unfortunately, he agreed with the other doc. I found a lovely MD who practices natural medicine and she did a TON of testing and proclaimed gluten intolerance. When I learned what going gluten free entailed, I chickened out on her too.

Now, fast forward another year with worse health. I always have some stomach issue. I have asthma too. I get an itchy rash on my arms if I stop taking Zyrtec. I have all of these symptoms that I can no longer ignore. So, today is day #1 of gluten free for me. I need all of the tips, tricks and help I can get!

How in the world do you ever eat a restaurant?

Do I have to worry about the products I use too?

Are there good alternatives to teriyaki sauce and other sauces?

Any advice or words of encouragement are greatly appreciated. I do know I don't have Celiac, but I definitely have gluten intolerance as they found gliadin antibodies in my stool.

Charity

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Hi Charity and welcome!

This is a great site. The best thing you can do now is to read, read, read here and many here are available for questions.

I would start out with a food journal and document everything that you eat and what if any reaction you have. Keep things simple like meats, seafood, potatoes, rice, veggies and fruit. Limit your seasoning to salt and pepper until you know what is safe to add.

The gluten free diet have a sharp learning curve and it takes some time to master. Don't be discouraged if you make mistakes. Everything that goes into your mouth should be checked for gluten to include lotions, toothpaste, vitamins, meds and even shampoos.

It's important that you know that should you want to be tested for Celiac, you must remain on a gluten diet for accuracy in testing. There are the blood tests that you should request from your doctor:

Anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA) both IgA and IgG

Anti-endomysial antibodies (EMA) - IgA

Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG) - IgA

Total IgA level

(I thought Crohns was found in the large intestines not the small) Celiac Disease is found in the small intestines.


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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Quickly to Momma Goose - Crohn's is the large intestine 99% (well most) of the time. Very rarely and in bad cases it can move to the small. Not in the textbooks though...or at least mine.

Charity - I agree 100% with Momma Goose. I would avoid eating out until you feel comfortable on your diet. This diet takes planning for meals and a good bit of getting used to, but 1 month from now you'll be getting into the swing of things and 6 months from now it will be routine for you.

About the time you start getting bored with your food or are having cravings, buy a gluten-free cookbook. Also, you can search this forum (or the general internet) for old posts on recipes and snacks, there are a wealth of them.

Also, if you go to a health food store like Whole Food or Wild Oats, you can find organic tamari sauce (just like soy). Now, just because it says "organic" or "tamari" does not mean it is safe for you. Scan that label for the claims "wheat-free" and "gluten-free."

One more item of consideration, you may want to begin to throw in the back of your mind the idea of a gluten-free household. There was a recent post titled "How gluten-free is your kitchen" with some great tips from members. I think your decision can rest on two things: your level of sensitivity and your family's ability/willingness to adapt.

Fortunately now is a great time be gluten-free. We have so many products, forums like these, and more public awareness than ever. You'll be fine!!

Rya


Celiac Disease 2007

Spinal Fusion 2006

Grave's Disease 2000

There is a way around every obstacle.

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Bragg's Liquid Aminos is the perfect sub for soy sauce...gluten-free!


Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28

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Some of La Choy's soy sauces are gluten free, as well as some generic versions.

San-J makes a gluten free soy sauce also - regular and low sodium.

Here is some other good information:

safe and unsafe ingredient list: https://www.celiac.com/categories/Safe--Gluten-Free--Food--List--_____--Unsafe--Foods--____--Ingredients-c-3383

companies that will clearly list gluten (wheat, rye, barley, barley malt, oats): http://www.glutenfreeindy.com/foodlists/index.htm

newly diagnosed info: http://www.glutenfreeindy.com/diagnosis/newlydiagnosed.htm

other good resources besides this forum and its owner, celiac.com:
www.celiacdiseasecenter.columbia.edu
www.celiaccentral.org
www.celiac.org
www.celiacdisease.net
www.gluten.net

All are reputable sites with great information that should help guide you.

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Eating out is hard. I have only done it a few times, when it was necessary. I usually get a potato, fruit platter, or salad. I have an allergy alert card for my son that I now use for myself too. Even though I don't have an allergy, it explains the things I can and can't have and the precautions that need to be taken in the kitchen. You can also do research on the web and print out gluten free menus to take with you. I keep a Lara bar in my purse in case there isn't much selection for me.


Amy

1989: I am diagnosed with IBS.

3/08: 8-year-old son diagnosed with Celiac (blood test and biopsy) and allergies to corn, egg whites, soy, peanuts, walnuts, wheat, and clam.

6/08: My Celiac test is negative.

7/08: I go completely gluten free despite negative test and NO MORE IBS SYMPTOMS!!

7/09: My Enterolab gluten sensitivity gene testing results indicate I have one Celiac gene and one gluten sensitivity gene.

8/09: I am diagnosed with Celiac based on gene testing results and positive response to diet.

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My dd chooses a mexican restaurant if she eats out and hasn't had a problem. Her only allergy is gluten so she orders corn tortillas. I told her to get Wendy's chili and Frosty if she needs something fast. I hear they are safe, I sure hope so.


Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28

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I enjoy eating out..we try to once a week. Subway sometimes. I get a salad BUT they need to change gloves and make it from start to finish on a fresh sheet. Some dont "get it" and are like...uhh..whatever. lol I get a veggie salad and take it home and add Tuna with my own dressing (Balamic Vinigertte)

I also do steak house...steak and potato...and some places when you tell them of Celiac are strict (AKA MOXIES) lol I eat alot of Chicken ceaser salads IF I go out, or snakc before I go and have potato skins. :D its not great but it gets me out...

HUGS babe

Rebecca


Gluten Free for 3 years.

An Aunt came to me and told me she Celiac Disease. (Had not spoken to her in 8 years) She said I should be tested and I did, however I had never heard of it before then.

I suffered with severe depression since 14. Took two kinds of meds that didnt help me at alll. After Celiac, I take no meds at all and feel great.

I am a new woman and life has changed. :)

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Ay yay yay Rebecca! Subway makes me nervous...

I used to be so cautious about going out to eat until my boyfriend and I moved to Houston. (I'll sidestep the sweet story about him finding two different gluten-free restaurants for my b-day and valentine's day..which are back to back.) Since then, we've found some great places to go and have never had problems.

Taco Milagro (if you're ever in Houston..) - bonus here is you can have everything on the menu!!!

Outback - ask for a gluten free menu and let your server know what's up

Carraba's - same, ask for the gluten-free menu

Pei Wei - ask for a gluten-free menu, they are very savvy

PF Chang's - same company as Pei Wei, also extremely savvy, believe the owner of the company has Celiac

Starbuck's is mostly gluten-free - by that I mean most of the drinks. I did read they were trying to develop a gluten-free cookie, only to put it on display with the other glutenous goodies :blink::rolleyes: ah....people. They tried.

Buca di Beppo - not sure they have an actual menu, but they are very allergy friendly and keep a lead chef in the kitchen to make sure everything is safe safe safe. If you like, you can call ahead and eat at the Kitchen Table and watch your food be prepared so you know it's OK.

Also, Whole Foods and Wild Oats offer lunch buffets in their stores. It's a little pricey, but if you're out and need food, you can usually find something.

Hope these options open up the doors at least for something every now and then.


Celiac Disease 2007

Spinal Fusion 2006

Grave's Disease 2000

There is a way around every obstacle.

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