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Lupin Flour Can Improve Nutritional Value Of Muffins, Study Finds

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People with proven peanut allergy should avoid lupine flour as it produces a similar reation [~ 40% people tested]. There have also been cases of coeliacs reacting to the protein in lupins also ..

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Ugh. Lupins. No. No. No. Poisonous to livestock.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lupinus#Potential_harms

Both sweet and bitter lupins in feed can cause livestock poisoning. Lupin poisoning is a nervous syndrome caused by alkaloids in bitter lupins, similar to neurolathyrism. Mycotoxic lupinosis is a disease caused by lupin material that is infected with the fungus Diaporthe toxica;[13] the fungus produces mycotoxins called phomopsins, which cause liver damage. Poisonous lupin seeds cause annually the loss of many cattle and sheep on western American Ranges.[14]

Put it under the category of "plants you don't want showing up in your hay bales or pastures."

That **** can cause liver problems, leading to a photosensitivity reaction in horses where they sunburn really badly under their white hair and pink skin.

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Ugh. Lupins. No. No. No. Poisonous to livestock.

Put it under the category of "plants you don't want showing up in your hay bales or pastures."

That **** can cause liver problems, leading to a photosensitivity reaction in horses where they sunburn really badly under their white hair and pink skin.

We are not livestock.

Italians use lupin flour, made from lupini beans (sp?) for use in gluten-free pastas and it makes some of the best pasta I have ever had. I haven't noticed hoards of Italians dying from it's use!

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All Italians are tested for coeliacs when they are babies. They use lupin flour in their baking .. The current studies that connect lupin flour and peanut allergies are being carried out by scientists and doctors in Italy ..

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We are not livestock.

So ?

I don't eat anything that can kill my animals.

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I wonder if the lupin flour is made from the lupine flowers though? Are they even the same plants?

I wouldn't want to eat it if it kills horses either. One of my nicknames a youngster was Hoss. :)

Looks like they are the same plant. But there are safe ones and dangerous ones.

360px-Mountaintop_Lupin_overlooking_Raspberry_Strait%2C_Alaska_2009_114.jpg

Photo courtesy Nancy Heise

Lupinus on Wiki

Culinary

The yellow legume seeds of lupins, commonly called lupin beans, were popular with the Romans, who spread the plant's cultivation throughout the Roman Empire; hence common names like lupini in Romance languages. The name 'Lupin' derives from the Latin word lupinus (meaning wolf), and was given with regard to the fact that many found that the plant has a tendency to ravage the land on which it grows. The peas, which appear after the flowering period, were also said to be fit only for the consumption of wolves. Lupin beans are commonly sold in a salty solution in jars (like olives and pickles) and can be eaten with or without the skin.

Edible lupins are referred to as sweet lupins because they contain smaller amounts of toxic alkaloids than the bitter lupin varieties. Newly bred variants of sweet lupins are grown extensively in Germany; they lack any bitter taste and require no soaking in salt solution. The seeds are used for different foods from vegan sausages to lupin-tofu or baking-enhancing lupin flour.

...

Potential harms

Lupins contain significant amounts of certain secondary compounds like isoflavones and toxic alkaloids, e.g. lupinine and sparteine. On 22 December 2006, the European Commission submitted directive 2006/142/EC, which amends the EU foodstuff allergen list to include "lupin and products thereof".

Both sweet and bitter lupins in feed can cause livestock poisoning. Lupin poisoning is a nervous syndrome caused by alkaloids in bitter lupins, similar to neurolathyrism. Mycotoxic lupinosis is a disease caused by lupin material that is infected with the fungus Diaporthe toxica;[13] the fungus produces mycotoxins called phomopsins, which cause liver damage. Poisonous lupin seeds cause annually the loss of many cattle and sheep on western American Ranges.[14]

People with peanut allergy should generally avoid lupins. In one study[15] 44% of people with peanut allergy had a positive allergy test for lupin allergy and 7 of 8 who had a positive test and were fed lupin as part of a study reacted to this food.

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All Italians are tested for coeliacs when they are babies. They use lupin flour in their baking .. The current studies that connect lupin flour and peanut allergies are being carried out by scientists and doctors in Italy ..

From what I have read and from what I have heard from people who have visited Italy, kids are tested if there is Celiac in their family.

It is true that those with a peanut allegy cannot eat lupin based products but what that has to do with Celiac is beyond me. Lupin flour is safe for Celiacs and makes a great pasta.

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So ?

I don't eat anything that can kill my animals.

What is harmful to livestock may not be harmful to humans. Apparently so because lupin flour is used extensively in Italy. If you don't want to eat it, that's fine but it doesn't mean people are harmed if they do. Like I said, I haven't noticed a lupin health epidemic in Italy......

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Most horses are smart enough to not eat it.

I grew up in NE TX. Lots of lupines there. They don't like traffic (where horses graze regularly) and horses don't eat them. At least mine didn't.

Never heard of people using then for food, there. Then again, the Bluebonnet is the state flower and you aren't supposed to pick it.

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Most horses are smart enough to not eat it.

I grew up in NE TX. Lots of lupines there. They don't like traffic (where horses graze regularly) and horses don't eat them. At least mine didn't.

Never heard of people using then for food, there. Then again, the Bluebonnet is the state flower and you aren't supposed to pick it.

There are many foods that Europeans use that Americans don't. That doesn't mean Europeans are wrong....they still eat better than most Americans do. I have eaten lupini beans in salads and they are very good. I also buy Italian pasta's because the gluten-free brands here in the States just aren't very good. Bi-Aglut pasta, from Italy, uses lupini flour and it's one of the best gluten-free pasta's I have ever eaten. I didn't keel over from toxic poisoning after eating it, either. ;)

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There are many foods that Europeans use that Americans don't. That doesn't mean Europeans are wrong....they still eat better than most Americans do. I have eaten lupini beans in salads and they are very good. I also buy Italian pasta's because the gluten-free brands here in the States just aren't very good. Bi-Aglut pasta, from Italy, uses lupini flour and it's one of the best gluten-free pasta's I have ever eaten. I didn't keel over from toxic poisoning after eating it, either. ;)

Where do you buy the Bi- Aglut pasta? Looks like I can get it on-line. Would be nice to try it before I buy a case.

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There are many foods that Europeans use that Americans don't. That doesn't mean Europeans are wrong....they still eat better than most Americans do. I have eaten lupini beans in salads and they are very good. I also buy Italian pasta's because the gluten-free brands here in the States just aren't very good. Bi-Aglut pasta, from Italy, uses lupini flour and it's one of the best gluten-free pasta's I have ever eaten. I didn't keel over from toxic poisoning after eating it, either. ;)

I didn't say that Europeans are "wrong". Just chimed in on the horse bit and remarked that in a lupine-rich area, I'd never heard of people eating them.

Good lord, if everyone ate like Americans, the world would be in trouble.

I'd try something made with it - but not if I had peanut allergies.

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Where do you buy the Bi- Aglut pasta? Looks like I can get it on-line. Would be nice to try it before I buy a case.

I have only found Bi-Aglut on-line also. The place I buy it from is an Italian importer out of NY. Company name is Quattrobimbi...if you google it you'll find the website. There is another pasta they sell, Le Venezianne, that is absolutely delicious also. It is a corn pasta for those who fear lupin flour! ;) I eat these 2 and I just cannot eat any other pasta after having these. Leave it to the Italians to produce the world's best gluten-free pasta.

I will add that the price of these 2 have come way down. When I was first diagnosed 7 years ago, it cost me $8.95 for an almost 18oz. bag of Bi-Aglut. Now it costs a little over $5.00 per bag. The Veneziane is a bit cheaper. You can buy single bags of anything from them, which is great because I don't eat enough pasta to warrant a whole case. Check out the website...lots of yummy stuff! They have lasagna noodles......

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A lot of human foods that are "rejected" or recalled for one reason or another, end up used in livestock feeds, there is an entire food salvage and recycling industry which is dedicated for this purpose, operating under the radar of the average consumer buying pet feed or horse type chows.

Most of the melamine contaminated gluten from China in the Great Pet Food Recall was deliberately disposed of in this manner, and ended up being fed to chickens, shrimp, fish, and pigs! FDA, paraphrased, when this little nugget was brought to light: "oh, don't worry, it's probably diluted out enough it won't cause any problems." :ph34r:

Introducing, and promoting the introduction of a food with a high probably of allergic reaction into the common human-animal food chain is NOT smart.

We already have a problem with non disclosure of common ingredients in the U.S. which cause illness for about 3 to 10 million of us, just concerning the wheat family and gluten intolerance. WE here in the USA have no standard for what is and what is not gluten free, already, except voluntary disclosure. Adding something which can cause a peanut type cross reaction to a common foodstuff such as breads, even if they are gluten free, is insane with our lack of labeling law enforcement.

Italians can do what they want with lupin flours.

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A lot of human foods that are "rejected" or recalled for one reason or another, end up used in livestock feeds, there is an entire food salvage and recycling industry which is dedicated for this purpose, operating under the radar of the average consumer buying pet feed or horse type chows.

Most of the melamine contaminated gluten from China in the Great Pet Food Recall was deliberately disposed of in this manner, and ended up being fed to chickens, shrimp, fish, and pigs! FDA, paraphrased, when this little nugget was brought to light: "oh, don't worry, it's probably diluted out enough it won't cause any problems." :ph34r:

Introducing, and promoting the introduction of a food with a high probably of allergic reaction into the common human-animal food chain is NOT smart.

We already have a problem with non disclosure of common ingredients in the U.S. which cause illness for about 3 to 10 million of us, just concerning the wheat family and gluten intolerance. WE here in the USA have no standard for what is and what is not gluten free, already, except voluntary disclosure. Adding something which can cause a peanut type cross reaction to a common foodstuff such as breads, even if they are gluten free, is insane with our lack of labeling law enforcement.

Italians can do what they want with lupin flours.

Lupins are only a problem for people with peanut allergies, not gluten free folk. You never know what people may be allergic to but that's not a good enough excuse to prohibit food from the food chain. You cannot please everyone and people should not expect the food industry to make food that is safe for everyone out there (from an allergen point of view)...that's ridiculous. In the US and Europe/Canada we have pretty high quality standards, in general, for our food production with regards to safety. Citing what happened in China as any comparison to what goes on in the US is downright laughable because China is communist and does not care a whole lot for their own population. They have very lax safety standards, as do much of the rest of the world. There is always room for improvement but you can pretty much know when you buy something in the US, Europe or Canada that you are getting something which is safe and hasn't been contaminated with something that could kill you. When we do slip up, like the problems with raw meat and E. Coli, things are traceable but it's not a normal occurrence here. And most important of all, you cannot compare something like the melamine problem or E. Coli to a bean. Apples and oranges.

I do not rely on government to think for me. I have never had any problems figuring out what was safe for me to eat as a Celiac. With a little education, it doesn't matter what the government does or doesn't do, you can use your own brain to figure out what's in the food you eat. If not, don't eat it! Eat something else. Lupin flour/beans are not derived from some toxic waste spill. Italians eat them all the time and it hasn't created a national crisis. Honestly, I wonder how some people ever find food to please them, they get so wound up about everything. If you don't want to eat lupin flour, then don't. The only people who have to worry about it are the peanut allergy sufferers and that is one of the 8 major allergens so the package will be clearly marked. Or you can do the unthinkable.....educate yourself so you'll know what you can and cannot have. This is the same mentality that has peanuts banned from flights....crazy! I don't demand they ban those wheaty pretzels because I am on board, even realizing that my intolerance reaction is different from an anaphylaxis...although you may not want to use the bathroom after me if I am glutened while flying! :ph34r:

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