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NewGlutenFreeChef

I Plan On Opening A Gluten Free Restaurant

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What about homemade onion rings? Can't be too difficult to make.

Probably not...will have to investigate when I get back to the States. The onions here in Poland are really really strong flavor-wise. I think the taste would be overpowering...

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I'm sure I saw some frozen onion rings that where gluten-free, though I'm also sure the CC possibilities are still there. Can't recall the brand name however.

What about homemade onion rings? Can't be too difficult to make.

They certainly are easy to make. This is just one of the recipes I like...

http://thecinnamonquill.com/blog/2009/06/onion-rings-baked/

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If there is pasta on the menu, please make sure the noodles are made from scratch! I would not be interested in going to a gluten-free restaurant if commercial pasta was on the menu. My scratch pasta is killer but I might be tempted to try it at a restaurant, too.

I would love to see chewy pretzels, bagels and croissants available. I'm trying to make them but they just are not the same. :( And profiteroles and/or eclairs and yeast doughnuts (not cake doughnuts).

Chicken and Dumplings with feather-light dumplings would be lovely and great comfort food. Beef Wellington with gluten free puff pastry would be great as well. Even excellent fish and chips!

In short, I can make most things at home myself so am rarely tempted to eat out. So it had better be special when I do! :) Most high-end restaurants (should) have tons of naturally gluten-free choices already but I think that a truly dedicated spot would do well if it offered something that no other place has. Not just naturally gluten-free stuff but things that are normally off limits to us such as chewy ciabatta bread. Little personal touches make a big difference. How about serving that great ciabatta with several compound butters and fleur de sel? That kind of thing really makes a dining experience special.

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They certainly are easy to make. This is just one of the recipes I like...

http://thecinnamonquill.com/blog/2009/06/onion-rings-baked/

OMG! These sound soooo yummy! Thank you. I so want to try them even with these intense Polish onions. I will have to see if my mother can send me corn flour since I've never seen it here in Krakow.

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I miss mexican food the most I make it at home (not the same)but miss eating it out with friends. L would also love to eat a sub, hoggie, different meats and toppings with oil, vinegar on a big soft roll that will not fall apart. I have to say i love Margaritaville ang go when ever I visit Florida, they have a frier and kitchen just for gluten-free meals

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If there is pasta on the menu, please make sure the noodles are made from scratch! I would not be interested in going to a gluten-free restaurant if commercial pasta was on the menu. My scratch pasta is killer but I might be tempted to try it at a restaurant, too.

I would love to see chewy pretzels, bagels and croissants available. I'm trying to make them but they just are not the same. :( And profiteroles and/or eclairs and yeast doughnuts (not cake doughnuts).

Chicken and Dumplings with feather-light dumplings would be lovely and great comfort food. Beef Wellington with gluten free puff pastry would be great as well. Even excellent fish and chips!

In short, I can make most things at home myself so am rarely tempted to eat out. So it had better be special when I do! :) Most high-end restaurants (should) have tons of naturally gluten-free choices already but I think that a truly dedicated spot would do well if it offered something that no other place has. Not just naturally gluten-free stuff but things that are normally off limits to us such as chewy ciabatta bread. Little personal touches make a big difference. How about serving that great ciabatta with several compound butters and fleur de sel? That kind of thing really makes a dining experience special.

Over on gluten free on a shoestring i just found an amazing pretzle bread recipe Also if you bake it and butter the crust it makes great pizza dough no boiling needed.

http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/pretzel-rolls/

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Over on gluten free on a shoestring i just found an amazing pretzle bread recipe Also if you bake it and butter the crust it makes great pizza dough no boiling needed.

http://glutenfreeona.../pretzel-rolls/

Mmmm, those look and sound so good :)

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What I would want from a restaurant (some are obvious or others have stated, but wanted to put it down anyway):

Pizza that has a nice crust that isn't cracker thin or so thick it is like cardboard.

Food that is flavored with seasonings (ie not plain dry chicken).

Bread sticks that are warm and fluffy.

I agree with the other on gluten free fried foods. I want yummy gluten free fried chicken (yes the fatty bad for you kind).

Cake that is light and fluffy. I can make the betty crocker type, but it is just not the same.

Corn bread (though I don't like the type with chunks of corn in it)

I would also really like some pumpkin bread/muffins. (every time I go to Starbucks I feel a little jealous seeing their pumpkin bread)

And I have to say, if this restaurant could be completely gluten free (this might be what you are thinking about), that would be best. I miss being able to go out to eat and not have to worry about getting sick. The best thing would be if the food was good enough that even our gluten eating friends would want to eat there. That way we could suggest it and not feel like we are having others have to give up what they want to go some where we can eat, that they might even suggest as a place to go out.

I grew up in Seattle, if I go back to visit and your place is in business I would totally make my parents drive me down there. (Though we would have to borrow my brother's car as my parent's car is electric and only goes about 50 miles).

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The only thing I would like from a gluten free restaurant is to know that the premises are completely gluten free, with straightforward fresh food prepared on site. If I was sure it was safe, then I would visit regularly if it were reasonably close, and occasionally as a treat if it was a bit further away.

As the above poster says, I think the trick will be to make the food delicious without it being obviously gluten free, so that celiacs can meet their family and friends there without it being a big deal.

On pizza bases, in the UK there is a gluten free brand called isobels which sells amongst other things a pizza base mix. You just add egg and water to it, part bake it with your own tomato paste, and then add the toppings just before the end. I have very picky non-celiac children who are grumpy about being deprived of their gluten treats because I can no longer cook them. They both say that this is the best pizza ever, better than the pizza made by our decent local pizza restaurants. The mix is made from cassava flour, with added lactose powder. Obviously the lactose powder will be a problem for many, but it might be worth experimenting with variations on this recipe.

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The only thing I would like from a gluten free restaurant is to know that the premises are completely gluten free, with straightforward fresh food prepared on site. If I was sure it was safe, then I would visit regularly if it were reasonably close, and occasionally as a treat if it was a bit further away.

I completely agree with this! A safe place to eat with quality food and I would be there all the time!

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I've only been gluten free for a little while but anything with GRAVY I'm a gravy nut case LOL

too bad you can't mimic bleu cheese LOL

Hi! Guess what? You CAN make excellent gluten-free gravy. Just substitute another starch (i.e. some like cornstarch, others sorghum flour, others a rice flour). There you go! :)

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I've only been gluten free for a little while but anything with GRAVY I'm a gravy nut case LOL

too bad you can't mimic bleu cheese LOL

Blue Cheese should not be a problem for those of us with celiac. I do miss Knorr's gravy (I used to doctor it up and make it even better).

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Blue Cheese should not be a problem for those of us with celiac. I do miss Knorr's gravy (I used to doctor it up and make it even better).

Really, b/c bleu cheese is made from bread mold (which I've known for years) - I read up on it - i heard it was no good -

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Really, b/c bleu cheese is made from bread mold (which I've known for years) - I read up on it - i heard it was no good -

Even the few that may still be made from bread do not contain gluten.

http://www.examiner.com/gluten-free-food-in-denver/gluten-free-101-is-blue-cheese-gluten-free

http://surefoodsliving.com/2007/12/is-blue-cheese-gluten-free/

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I've only been gluten free for a little while but anything with GRAVY I'm a gravy nut case LOL

When I make gravy , I just replace the flour with either corn starch or rice flour. OR POTATO STARCH ,potato starch is EXCELLENT in gravy !!

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For gravy and pretty much any thickened stove-top sauce (gravy, bechamel/white sauce, etc.) I just use half cornstarch/half rice flour in the same amount as called for in any other recipe. Works wonderfully.

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