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Confusing Diagnosis, Would Appreciate Your Opinion!


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18 replies to this topic

#16 GFinDC

 
GFinDC

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 06:46 AM

Hi cyclinglady. Thanks for your input. I have mentioned gall bladder to every doctor I've seen. I keep hearing that there is nothing visible on ultrasound/ct scan so everything is fine!!!

I'm going to mention this to the new specialist too. I'm pleased you are you're family are all well now after having the surgeries!

Can I just ask, would ga bladder problems give inflammation in the small intestine? If so, why?

Many thanks

 

Hi LV,

 

I went for the technicolor stool myself.  Pale tannish, black as night, green as cucumber!  A little bleeding thrown in sometimes for added flare.

 

The gallbladder releases bile into the duodenum in response to chemical signals from the small intestine.  Those chemical signals are dependent on things in the small intestine being in good repair and working sorta right.  So there is a definite possibility celiac can impact the performance of the gallbladder.  The bile acts to nuetralize the partially digested food from the stomach.  It is partially digested from being chewed up and then bathed in hydrocloric acid.  As you can imagine it is nice for your small intestine f the hydrocloric acid is nuetralized.  If it isn't nuetralized, a bit of digestion of the small intestine, oops, inflammation, may occur.

 

The small intestine is in a constant state of repairing itself because of the rough life it leads.  The villi are  rebuilding all the time and being torn down all the time.  In normal guts the villi rebuild themselves fast enough to stay ahead of the damage.  But with celiac disease the immune cells attack the villi and make it hard to ever get recovered.  They can't rebuild fast enough to stay ahead of the damage.

 

The immune system is very powerful and keeps us from dieing of the common cold.  It's no light-weight and it doesn't give up easily.  It may be weeks to months before your immune system settles down and stops attacking your gut.  The thing to do is avoid all gluten like the plague for a year or so.  Give your immune system a chance to relax.  Every time your gut is exposed to dietary gluten it will kick off a new round of immune reaction.

 

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get tested before starting the gluten-free diet.
Get your vitamin/mineral levels tested also.
Don't eat in restaurants
Eat only whole foods not processed foods.
Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.
Take probiotics.
Take gluten-free vitamins.
Take digestive enzymes.
Avoid dairy if it causes symptoms.
Avoid sugars and starchy foods. They can cause bloating.
Avoid alcohol.
Watch out for cross contamination.

Helpful threads:

FAQ Celiac com
http://www.celiac.co...celiac-disease/

Newbie Info 101
http://www.celiac.co...ewbie-info-101/


  • 0
Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

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#17 lasvegas

 
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Posted 06 June 2014 - 11:51 AM

Thanks everyone for your input.

I had colonoscopy and gastroscope today. The great news is my colitis is in remission and there's no sign of inflammation in my large bowel.

The doc inspected the bottom of my small bowel during the colonoscopy and the villi all looked very healthy.

On the gastroscopy he found an ulcer on my gullet (oesophagas) which he said has been caused by too much stomac acid.
I don't get symptoms of heart but not gerd but I'm assuming I could have it without realising?

The duodenum folds are alightly thickened but there's no immediate sign of inflammation.
Prescribed omeprazole for 8 weeks to assist in healing the ulcer.

Took biopsies from everywhere so I should get those results in a few weeks.

Any input on this would be much appreciated. Has anyone else had oesophagatis? And did it heal (and did that reduce the amount of pain!?)

I have a follow up appointment booked and I'm going to insist on having a hida scan due to your advice above.
Thanks again to everyone that responded above :)
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#18 lasvegas

 
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Posted 06 June 2014 - 12:13 PM

Hi LV,

I went for the technicolor stool myself. Pale tannish, black as night, green as cucumber! A little bleeding thrown in sometimes for added flare.

The gallbladder releases bile into the duodenum in response to chemical signals from the small intestine. Those chemical signals are dependent on things in the small intestine being in good repair and working sorta right. So there is a definite possibility celiac can impact the performance of the gallbladder. The bile acts to nuetralize the partially digested food from the stomach. It is partially digested from being chewed up and then bathed in hydrocloric acid. As you can imagine it is nice for your small intestine f the hydrocloric acid is nuetralized. If it isn't nuetralized, a bit of digestion of the small intestine, oops, inflammation, may occur.

The small intestine is in a constant state of repairing itself because of the rough life it leads. The villi are rebuilding all the time and being torn down all the time. In normal guts the villi rebuild themselves fast enough to stay ahead of the damage. But with celiac disease the immune cells attack the villi and make it hard to ever get recovered. They can't rebuild fast enough to stay ahead of the damage.

The immune system is very powerful and keeps us from dieing of the common cold. It's no light-weight and it doesn't give up easily. It may be weeks to months before your immune system settles down and stops attacking your gut. The thing to do is avoid all gluten like the plague for a year or so. Give your immune system a chance to relax. Every time your gut is exposed to dietary gluten it will kick off a new round of immune reaction.

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get tested before starting the gluten-free diet.
Get your vitamin/mineral levels tested also.
Don't eat in restaurants
Eat only whole foods not processed foods.
Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.
Take probiotics.
Take gluten-free vitamins.
Take digestive enzymes.
Avoid dairy if it causes symptoms.
Avoid sugars and starchy foods. They can cause bloating.
Avoid alcohol.
Watch out for cross contamination.

Helpful threads:

FAQ Celiac com
http://www.celiac.co...celiac-disease/

Newbie Info 101
http://www.celiac.co...ewbie-info-101/


Hi GFinDC - just noticed your reply and wanted to say thanks!

I'm already eating a non-processed diet. Basically a paleo diet - just fruit/veg/protein. Nothing else!

Have you got any suggestions for foods that could be added safely or is this what you are for the first year?
  • 0

#19 GFinDC

 
GFinDC

    A little farting never hurt anybody... :-).

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 03:14 PM

Hi GFinDC - just noticed your reply and wanted to say thanks!

I'm already eating a non-processed diet. Basically a paleo diet - just fruit/veg/protein. Nothing else!

Have you got any suggestions for foods that could be added safely or is this what you are for the first year?

Hi Lasvegas,

 

There are some things that I would consider safe.  Mission brand corn tortillas are made on dedicated lines and are gluten-free.  They only have a few ingredients and have never given me problems.  There are some rice wraps like Food For Life brown rice tortillas and Rudi's wraps that are fine.

 

Nuts are often ok, but you need to verify the ingredients.  Planters brands will label any gluten ingredients in their nut products.  Nuts in the shell are safe.

 

If you buy your own gluten-free flours (or make them) you can try making these microwave buns.

 

Easy yummy bread in minutes
http://www.celiac.co...ead-in-minutes/

 

The point of eating whole foods for awhile is to get used to eating different and avoid making mistakes and also give your body the easiest chance of healing.  If you feel you are stable and healthy at 5 or 6 months then go ahead and start adding other foods one at a time.  Once you're gut is healthy for a while you'll probably notice foods that cause issues easier.


  • 0
Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul




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