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Camt Make A Good Loaf Of Bread

4 posts in this topic

Ok so im relatively new at this. Ive been trying to make a decent loaf of bread for a month now and it always comes out as tea biscuit texture and flavour. i canot use it for sandwiches either because it fall apart.

I tryed an all in one bread mix but it comes out smaller than when I put it in.

What am i doing wrong????


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Since you are new to the gluten-free lifestyle give yourself a break & purchase a couple of better bread mixes..

KingArthur flour has a bread mix, Pamela's, Schar

Anna's bread mixes are a few of the better ones...

You can also go to for a large recipe selection from better batter flour..

Lorka several years ago posted her bread recipe on here, I love it& it was fairly easy recipe.

Another place that has a good recipe is Living Without website has Quinoa Wonder Bread that gets raves.. There are so many more but I hope one of these will work for you.

The three bakers have a new 7 graqinbread that is very tasty with lots of protein & fiber verses the rice, & starchy type breads..

Also Simona has some tasty recipes posted here as well...

Have you made bread before going gluten-free? many at first if they have never tried homemade bread kill the yeast by too hot of water or to cold of water& it doesn't activate the yeast.

if bread sinks in the middle it can be from to much liquid.. I always takeout 2 tbsp from any bread recipe & it has kept the bread from falling..

There are some excellent bread makers on here so I hope they chime in


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Gluten-free bread is difficult and it sometimes takes many tried to get it right, so don't give up. If you're using a mix, make sure you follow their instructions carefully. Use a thermometer to check the water temperature, and don't add all the water until you see how it is mixing. You want all of the dry ingredients to be wet and incorporated, but often you don't need all of the water. Stop the mixer and scrape the batter with a spatula - it should hold its shape but not be stiff and hard to move, but also not be drippy. How big is your bread pan? Maybe try a smaller or at least narrower one. Don't let the dough rise higher than the top of the pan. When you have baked it for the suggested time, touch it in the middle. It should be firm, but a little springy. If it feels too springy (and this is one of the things that unfortunately you might have to learn from repeat tries), put it back in for 5 minutes, and repeat if necessary. If you can stick an instant-read thermometer into the center of the bread, it should be at least 190 degrees.

Despite your best efforts it might still fall a little in the middle, because gluten-free bread is evil and hates us and laughs at us behind our backs. If it is so ugly that you can't stand to see it as a sandwich, you can always cube it and dry it out in the oven for bread crumbs and croutons. But keep trying, and learn to enjoy sandwich fillings naked, because you will probably end up eating less bread than you used to, in which case you won't have to be sad when your expensive bread mix doesn't turn out. And remember we're here for you.


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Before you give up, please try this loaf. We enjoy tasty sandwich bread all the time.

My hubs makes this bread every week. It never falls and it tastes great.

Gluten Free Sandwich Bread (adapted from the Gluten Free Girl)


2 cups white rice flour

*****NOTE: For variety and higher protein/fiber, substitute 1 cup garbanzo bean flour or 1 cup brown rice flour for one of the cups of white rice flour.

1/3 cup tapioca flour

2/3 cup potato STARCH (NOT potato flour)

1 TBLS. xanthan gum

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

2 tablespoons sugar

1 1/3 cups lukewarm water

1 tablespoon fast rise yeast (Fleishmann's is gluten-free)

2 tablespoons butter

3 egg whites, lightly beaten (***OR 2 whole eggs is fine. The whites alone just give it a “white bread “ look :>))

2 teaspoons lemon juice


1. In the bowl of a heavy-duty mixer, place flours, xanthan gum, and salt. Blend with mixer on low.

2. In a small bowl , dissolve the sugar in the water, then add yeast.

3. Wait until the mixture foams slightly, then blend into the dry ingredients.

4. Add the butter, egg whites, and lemon juice. Beat on high for 3 minutes.

5. Spoon dough into a heavy duty greased 4X4X8 loaf pan. We spray it with Pam.

6. Cover the dough with a paper towel and let it rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk, 45-60 minutes.

7. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Bake for 18 minutes and lower temperature to 365 degrees Bake for 42 more minutes for total of 60 minutes.

8. Remove from pan to cool on a rack. We start right side up, but turn it after 10 minutes and then, let it cool upside down and then, turn it on all sides--to prevent collapsing of the loaf.

A local, gluten-free baker gave us that tip.

COOL completely before slicing.

That's the key. Do NOT slice it until it is well cooled.

Until we figured this out, we made more "clunkers" that you can imagine :lol: and before my DX, we made the best french bread and pizza dough ever! It was frustrating and we wanted to give up, too. Do not despair!! It is possible to make decent bread, I promise.


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