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The Total Iga And Total Igg : Can Lack Of Iga And Igg Be

caused by celiac?

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8 replies to this topic

#1 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 04 November 2012 - 05:10 AM

I recently had a celiac panel drawn. I am wondering if lack of antibodies reverses? Can it be caused by Celiac? I haven't received my current test results, but considering past tests, I am afraid this will be how mine comes out. Any information would be appreciated.

Diana
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#2 GottaSki

 
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Posted 04 November 2012 - 06:06 AM

I'm confused. Haven't you been gluten-free for many months now? Total IgA and IgG counts aren't going to make a difference to antibody tests -- if you have been gluten-free - you are not making antibodies to be measured.
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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#3 kareng

 
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Posted 04 November 2012 - 06:48 AM

I'm confused. Haven't you been gluten-free for many months now? Total IgA and IgG counts aren't going to make a difference to antibody tests -- if you have been gluten-free - you are not making antibodies to be measured.


She beat me to it. That was what I was going to say.

If you want a "real" diagnosis of Celiac - you might need to start eating gluten, again. Otherwise, save your money on these tests.
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#4 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 04 November 2012 - 09:44 AM

I am sorry, I wasn't clear: I had a negative test for gluten antibodies at 3 weeks gluten free, so I expect a false negative for that. If I were really screwing my diet, I guess that antibodies could be detected, but the food intolerance panel I spoke of included the celiac panel because it would produce information about the Total numbers of antibodies. If the total number were 0, as I expect mine may be, than we know that everything else may be negative.

I am not trying to dignose Celiac with my testing I have already prooved that to my health professionals, myself, and even my husband.. My test is for other food intolerances. If I have food intolerances the total IGG and IGA (as I understand) should be raised. My fear is that I will be the 1 in 500 that do not have these measureable antibodies.

My question is whether celiac can be a causing factor of the lack of these antibodies or not? I wonder if anyone can answer that? Also will being gluten free lead to these antibodies being produced in the future. Please let me know if you have experience with this.
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#5 GottaSki

 
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Posted 04 November 2012 - 11:01 AM

Perhaps you could provide links for the facts and figures you are talking about with regard to food intolerance. I've done substantial research into food intolerance and am just not clear what your goal is. Food Intolerance blood testing is not a reliable way to determine what foods you should avoid. I completed a very strict elimination/trial for over six months to determine what I was intolerant of - many foods caused severe reactions. When I was done my allergists re-ran both IgG and IgM blood tests for each food I had a reaction to - ALL negative. Might be helpful if I could read the research that is the basis for your questions.
  • 0

-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#6 beachbirdie

 
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Posted 04 November 2012 - 02:47 PM

http://www.pnas.org/...75/7/3387.short

http://gut.bmj.com/c...3/10/1459.short

These are only two links showing there might be a relationship between food intolerances and IgA/IgG antibodies. More stuff showed up at Google Scholar, I just did a cursory look. Two small revelations here; foods besides gluten can cause antibody production, and people with IgA/IgG insufficiency may have greater sensitivity to some foods than people with normal levels..

When I looked for causation of the IgA/IgG deficiency, I couldn't find food sensitivity as a cause for the deficiency. What I did find was that people who have those deficiencies develop problems because their bodies are more sensitive to food antigens because the barriers present in "normal" people aren't there in those with immune insufficiencies.

Don't know if that's helpful or not.
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1999 - Hypothyroid
2003 - Hashimoto's Disease
2008 - Diverticulitis
2009 - Significant Vit D Deficiency
2011 - Diverticulitis again
2011 - HLA-DQ2.2
2012 - TtG IgG positive... I am now, finally, Gluten Free - 5/16/2012

#7 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 04 November 2012 - 07:27 PM

http://www.pnas.org/...75/7/3387.short

http://gut.bmj.com/c...3/10/1459.short

These are only two links showing there might be a relationship between food intolerances and IgA/IgG antibodies. More stuff showed up at Google Scholar, I just did a cursory look. Two small revelations here; foods besides gluten can cause antibody production, and people with IgA/IgG insufficiency may have greater sensitivity to some foods than people with normal levels..

When I looked for causation of the IgA/IgG deficiency, I couldn't find food sensitivity as a cause for the deficiency. What I did find was that people who have those deficiencies develop problems because their bodies are more sensitive to food antigens because the barriers present in "normal" people aren't there in those with immune insufficiencies.

Don't know if that's helpful or not.


Yes, thank you, I will check the links.
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#8 beachbirdie

 
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Posted 04 November 2012 - 08:02 PM

Yes, thank you, I will check the links.


Not sure the articles will apply to your particular circumstances, but hopefully it will help people understand that there is often more going on than just reactions to gluten. I hope you will post your IgG and IgA results when you get them, I'm interested to know what you find. My mom is deficient in both IgA and IgG, makes celiac blood tests worthless for her even though she has symptoms. :(

Have you eliminated other foods besides gluten from your diet? I can't remember, it's been a while since I've seen you post what's going on with you!
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1999 - Hypothyroid
2003 - Hashimoto's Disease
2008 - Diverticulitis
2009 - Significant Vit D Deficiency
2011 - Diverticulitis again
2011 - HLA-DQ2.2
2012 - TtG IgG positive... I am now, finally, Gluten Free - 5/16/2012

#9 cavernio

 
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Posted 06 November 2012 - 04:11 PM

"My question is whether celiac can be a causing factor of the lack of these antibodies or not?"

I haven't heard anything about celiac and inability/lack of those antibodies being connected. I would be surprised if someone has researched that specifically, but I do think that a starting for a study like that could be conducted using already existing data for other celiac research. It'd be a simple number thing; compare how many controls (ie people without celiac disease or suspect it) have it and compare to the number of biopsy diagnosed celiacs who have that problem. So with that said, I would think that if there were a connection that someone might see just by looking at the data, some researcher would probably run the stats and see if it were actually a thing. But I would think that if there is a weak relationship between celiac disease and the lack of the factor required for those antibodies to work, it seems much more plausible that it hasn't been found.
Just my take on it.
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diagnosed Jan 2012, bloodwork only
June 2012 positive visual of celiac disease from gastroscopy




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