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    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    This recipe comes to us from "ksymonds84" in the Gluten-Free Forum.
    Ingredients:
    2 racks of baby back ribs
    1/3 cup of McCormick’s Grill Mates Barbeque
    1 bottle of gluten-free beer
    Gluten-free barbeque sauce
    Directions:
    Remove the casing on the back side of ribs. Pour the bottle of beer in a large jelly roll pan. Add the ribs to the pan and sprinkle them with McCormick's. Cover tightly in foil and bake in the oven at 200F degrees for 4½ hours (up to 6 hours depending on size of ribs--we used small ones). Next, lightly coat the ribs with Gluten-Free Barbeque sauce and grill them on medium heat for 15 minutes. The ribs should fall off the bone and be very yummy!


    Jefferson Adams
    I’ve always loved a combination of kalamata and green olives in this dish because their tart saltiness plays nicely against the rich, creamy mushroom sauce. However, almost any variety would work well, just keep an eye out for pits.
    The chicken is a great agent for the graceful preparation of mushrooms; you’ll surely find yourself scooping up every last bit of mushroom with your fork. In a spell of culinary enthusiasm, I often also add some red wine to the sauce for an extra kick. This recipe is easily adaptable for smaller or larger parties and as an added bonus, any leftover sauce goes great atop other vegetables, meats or rice.
    Ingredients:
    4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
    1 pound button mushrooms, sliced
    1 cup olives, chopped
    1 small onion, chopped
    1 cup heavy cream
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    ½ teaspoon dried thyme
    ¼ cup olive oil, divided
    2 tablespoons butter
    4 toothpicks, optional
    1 ½ teaspoons each salt and pepper, plus more to taste
    Directions:
    Preheat oven to 350° F.
    Rinse and pat dry chicken. Cut a pocket in the thickest part of the breast and stuff with ¼ cup of chopped olives. If olives spill out, pierce with a toothpick to keep closed. Season with salt and pepper.
    Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large pan and sear chicken 3-4 minutes on each side. Transfer to a baking dish and finish in the oven for 15-20 minutes depending on the thickness of the breast.
    Meanwhile, heat remaining oil with butter in the same pan over medium heat. Add onion and cook for 5 minutes until translucent. Add mushrooms, stirring frequently for an additional 5 minutes. Add cream, garlic and thyme to pan and reduce heat to low. Let simmer until sauce begins to thicken, 5-10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
    Remove chicken from oven and discard toothpicks. Spoon mushroom sauce over chicken and serve.


    Lois Parker
    I based this recipe on one from  UKTV Food.  This pie has a crisp golden pastry and succulent rich filling.  Pureed beans and onion thicken the sauce.  If you don't want to puree them just add them to the rest of the ingredients at the start of the slow cooking stage.
    Serves 6-8
    Ingredients:
    1 pack diced venison (c340g)
    1 pack mushrooms (c 200g)  I used chestnut
    1 bottle beer - I used Nick Stafford's Hambleton Ales GFA Gluten and Wheat Free Ale
    2 onions - chopped
    2 carrots- diced
    3 cloves garlic - squashed
    vegetable oil
    1 tsp. fresh thyme leaves or 1/4 tsp. dried
    stock / water - I used chicken as I always have that available in the freezer.
    1 small can beans -  cannellini / borlotti or gluten-free baked beans
    1 tbsp. tomato paste
    pepper
    Pastry:
    500 g gluten-free flour (40% urid (lentil), 40% tapioca, 20% cornmeal)
    250 butter
    water to bind
    egg wash for pastry top if wanted (an egg beaten with a little water, brushed on to pastry before cooking).
    Directions:
    Trim any cartilage from the venison pieces. Dry with paper towel.  This will make it spit less when you fry it.
    Cover the bottom of your pan with a thin layer of oil.  Place individual pieces of meat in this oil when hot and allow to brown.  Don't over-crowd the pan; you may need to do it in two batches.  When the meat is brown set aside in another dish.
    Put the onion and whole squashed garlic cloves in the pan and cook slowly until translucent.  Add extra oil if needed. Remove from the pan.
    Cook the carrots and mushrooms for two or three minutes then add the meat back to the pan.  Add the stock, ale, thyme, tomato paste and pepper, and also salt if you want to.  The liquid should cover the meat. Put the lid on and simmer gently for 1.5 hours, checking the levels of the liquid every half hour or so.  If it is getting dry add some water.
    Meanwhile, put the cooked onions, garlic and the can of un-drained beans in a blender and puree. This will form the thickened gravy for the pie. You can leave the onions and beans un-pureed if you prefer.
    When the meat and vegetables have cooked for the hour and a half, add the bean and onion puree.    Check for seasoning.  Cook for a few minutes, stirring, until the gravy is the texture you like.  This stew is now ready to be eaten by itself, frozen for another occasion, or used as the pie filling.  Leave to cool before making the pie.
    To make the pastry: cut the butter into the flour either by hand or in the food processor.  Add water a little at a time until the dough coheres in a slightly claggy ball.  Wrap in cling film and set aside for at least fifteen minutes for the flours to absorb the water.  If you make it ahead of time, keep it in the fridge but allow it to come to room temperature before rolling out or it will be too stiff to work.
    Roll pastry out on a floured board to fit your pie dish or dishes.  This recipe is enough for two 1 pint /  half liter pie dishes.  If you aren't sure of the fit of your dishes, measure how much stew you have and see how that much water fits into your dish.  Place a layer of pastry in the bottom of the dish and put the cooled filling in.  Dampen the top edge of the pastry and place on the top layer of pastry.  Crimp or fork the edges together.  Brush egg wash on if you want a deeper golden and shiny pastry.  Bake for 35 minutes at 170C until pastry is golden brown.
    Left over pastry can be made into jam tarts, or rolled out and frozen between greaseproof paper sheets until wanted.

    Jefferson Adams
    Okay, salmon is one of my all-time favorite fish. I love it raw, I love it cooked. I like it grilled, baked, poached or fried. Pretty much any way you can make it, I'll eat it with a smile on my face. Salmon is one of those fish that needs minimal added preparation to be delicious. This recipe honors that fact. It is fast, easy and tasty, and it will have your guests clamoring for more.
    Ingredients:
    12 ounce salmon fillet, cut into 4 pieces
    2 cloves garlic, crushed
    ½ tablespoon of paprika
    1 lemon cut into wedges, for serving
    Coarse-grained salt
    Freshly ground black pepper

    Directions:
    Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.
    Season salmon with salt and pepper and paprika. Rub with garlic. Place salmon, skin side down, on a non-stick baking sheet or baking dish.
    Bake until salmon is cooked through, about 12 to 15 minutes.
    Serve with lemon wedges. I like to serve it with a side of rice, or with my favorite gluten-free pasta.

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    You just need to be patient and avoid gluten at all costs.   Chances are you are still dealing with the consequences of your recent gluten exposure.   Please keep researching celiac disease and how to avoid gluten.  Knowledge is your best defense.   No, never dizziness or facial numbness for me, but everyone is different.  
    It’s so awful isn’t it. Do you ever get dizziness and a numb face? Mines just awful atm and I constantly think oh it must be something more serious   It’s so awful isn’t it. Do you ever get dizziness and a numb face? Mines just awful atm and Iconstantly think oh it must besomething more serious  
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