Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Jefferson Adams

    Why Bananas No Longer Cure Celiac Disease

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Bananas were once seen as a miracle cure for celiac disease. What happened?


    Image: CC--GoonSquadSarah
    Caption: Image: CC--GoonSquadSarah

    Celiac.com 03/27/2019 - For several decades starting in the 1920s, bananas came to be seen as a miracle food. Bananas were thought by many doctors to possess tremendous healing properties, and came to play a role in numerous health and dietary treatments. The banana diet even became a treatment for celiac disease. In 1924, Dr. Sidney Haas began to advocate the benefits of a the high-calorie, banana-based diet that excluded starches, but included bananas, milk, cottage cheese, meat and vegetables.

    The diet was initially so effective in celiac disease patients that it was adopted by numerous doctors, and endorsed in the 1930s by the University of Maryland, according to pediatric gastroenterologist Alessio Fasano, chair of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and a specialist in celiac disease.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    Doctors told mothers to feed bananas to their infants starting at 4 weeks. And for a long time, the banana diet seemed to help people "recover" from celiac disease. However, Dr. Haas and his colleagues were wrong about the curative powers of bananas, and that seemingly honest mistake had long-term consequences for numerous patients with celiac disease.

    For all its benefits in helping celiac patients to avoid wheat, their bodies never became tolerant to the gluten proteins that trigger celiac disease. So, when they re-introduced wheat into their diets, as many did, assuming they were cured, they suffered the common physical consequences of untreated celiac disease.

    One such patient was Lindy Redmond, whose celiac disease was “cured” with the banana diet as a child. "All my life I have told doctors I had celiac as a child," says Lindy Redmond, "and that I grew out of it. And all my life I have eaten wheat." Thinking she was cured, but suffering years of symptoms, Redmond, at 66 years old, finally underwent a gluten-antibody test and and received an intestinal biopsy.

    "My intestine was very damaged," she reports. "My doctor said she didn't know if it would ever recover." It was then that Redmond wondered about the possible connection between lifelong, untreated celiac disease and her two miscarriages, frequent bouts of colds and bronchitis, and interminable constipation. Now 74 and off gluten, Redmond says the colds and constipation are gone.

    The banana diet remained a common treatment for celiac disease until the early 1950s, when Dutch pediatrician, Willem Karel Dicke, and his colleagues identified gluten as the trigger for celiac disease, that bananas were finally discredited as a celiac disease treatment, and the gluten-free diet was born.

    Most doctors quickly acknowledged the contribution made by Dr. Dicke and his colleagues. However, Haas continued to speak out against the gluten-free diet and went on promoting his banana-based cure, claiming that only the banana diet could achieve "a cure which is permanent." This conclusion was, of course, simply wrong.

    Eventually, the European medical community adopted Dicke's gluten-free diet treatment, but in the United States, at least partly due to these erroneous medical beliefs, celiac disease remained under-diagnosed, and many patients suffered needlessly.

    Read more at NPR.org

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    9 hours ago, Guest flutegal64 said:

    Haven’t I heard some celiacs have issues tolerating bananas? I thought there was a protein in bananas linked to celiac.

    No bananas do not contain gluten .  There are no “proteins linked to Celiac” in a banana.  

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    9 hours ago, Guest flutegal64 said:

    Haven’t I heard some celiacs have issues tolerating bananas? I thought there was a protein in bananas linked to celiac.

    It is not gluten related, but some people get allergies to it, or an intolerance. If you have secondary issues like SIBO, Candida, or gut issues that flare to sugars then it can cause gas and bloat. But it will not cause the immune system to attack the intestines like gluten in celiacs. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    2 hours ago, kareng said:

    No bananas do not contain gluten .  There are no “proteins linked to Celiac” in a banana.  

    I can't tolerate bananas not due to celiac disease but due to IBS..  I find many Celiacs have IBS as well.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/15/2010 - Willem-Karel Dicke was born in 1905, in Dordrecht, Holland, and died Utrecht in 1962.  Dicke was a Dutch pediatrician, the first clinician to develop the gluten-free diet, and to prove that certain types of flour cause relapses in celiac disease patients.
    From 1922 until 1929, Dicke studied medicine in Leiden.  He then specialized in pediatrics in Juliana Children’s Hospital in The Hague from 1929 until 1933.  In 1936, at just 31 years of age, he was named medical director of the hospital. 
    In the 1940s and 1950s he went on to formally establish the gluten-free diet, forever changing treatment methods and clinical outco...

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 04/29/2010 - May is designated as National Celiac Awareness Month. As such, I thought it would be a great opportunity to explore the history of celiac disease. Most people think of celiac disease as a modern day ailment, which predominantly affects  those of European descent and in Westernized societies. However in my research, I found that the best place to start when referencing the history of celiac disease, is actually the beginning of humans.
    In the beginning of humans, known as the Neolithic Period,  humans were hunters and gatherers and primarily survived on fruits, nuts, and meat when available. During the Neolithic Period,  humans ev...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/22/2017 - Once upon a time, bananas were thought by many doctors to possess tremendous healing properties. Bananas were used to help diabetics to use weight. Doctors told mothers to feed bananas to their infants starting at 4 weeks. And for a long time, the diet seemed to help people "recover" from celiac disease.
    Invented by Dr. Sidney Haas in 1924, the high-calorie, banana-based diet excluded starches, but included bananas, milk, cottage cheese, meat and vegetables.
    The diet was so effective in celiac disease patients that it was adopted by numerous doctors, and endorsed in the 1930s by the University of Maryland, according to pediatric...

    Kelly Carter
    Celiac.com 03/22/2019 - I'm going to talk about my journey through the Nexvax2 trial. It is a clinical trial to study the effectiveness of this drug to prevent mucosal damage due to cross contamination. There are 4 phases to this trial - Screening, Updosing, Maintenance, and Post-Study. Each phase has different requirements from the patient and different goals.
    Screening for the Nexvax2 Clinical Trial
    I found out about the Nexvax2 trial from my sister. Her job involves keeping up with medical stocks. She saw that ImmusanT had started their clinical trial - a double, blind, placebo controlled study for an injection to retrain the immune system...