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blueeyedmanda

Need To Make A Bed Comfortable

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I found a good way to warm up the foot of the bed--I heat a buckwheat filled bag (the kind that you use to wrap around sore necks, knees, etc) in the microwave for a few minutes and put in the bed for a little while before I turn in.

It's so relaxing--especially this time of year--to have warm feet when you first get into bed. The best part is it cools off gradually and there's nothing to turn off.

We have two now--one for me (works on a sore tummy, too) and one for my husband's arthritic knee :)

Good Idea!! Safer too . . . I was thinking about adding a timer in case I fell asleep before turning it off.


Janet

Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted.

animal0028.gif

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Or drool . . . :lol::lol:

hence the need for cotton, easily washable, bed sheets.


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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Good Idea!! Safer too . . . I was thinking about adding a timer in case I fell asleep before turning it off.

Those electric pads are dangerous if you fall asleep with it on--a friend of mine got a nasty burn on her leg by doing that ;)


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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I really have to second the sleep number bed. We have a king size one, and each side can be adjusted to individual comfort levels. We bought one without the pillow top, as we were told that they go flat pretty quickly.

The guarantee on these beds is way longer than a regular bed. We bought ours about ten years ago, and one of the air hose connections just broke. The sent us a whole new set, with no questions asked. It's a really great company.

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Oh! For warming the bed, I have a mattress warmer - it's like an electric blanket, but goes atop the mattress. I turn it to high about 45 minutes before bed, then crawl in......FABULOUS!! :rolleyes:

so the bed's all warm and cozy but you turn it off before going to sleep.

I also have a noise machine - for camping and home. A great idea.


SUSIE

Diagnosed January 2006

"I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells." ~Dr. Seuss

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for the "I have a million things going through my head" it *really* helps to start 'shutting down' at least half an hour, if not more, before bed. do *not* go running through the house picking things up, do not go checking your email or taking care of mail - at most, read a book. also, keeping a pad of paper next to your bed so you can write it down (don't turn on a light, just scribble, it'll be fine) might help in those cases where it's *really* urgent. meditating before bed can help as well. mind racing, it can be a hard habit to get out of, I know.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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I have had insominia for years and years and I tried all those suggestions. I have white noise, fat N fluffy matress topper (but the bed itself is too hard). Sleep # - My husband doesn't want one. I take Ambien for so long that I am immune to it now.

I think too much at night; not only write it down but will call my work #and leave myself a message and I still am awake worrying about things.

I wish I had an answer for you.


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

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I wish I had an answer for you.

So sorry, Deb. This used to be me - until SEROQUEL saved the day. I never, ever become immune to it......it's technically a "mood stabilizer" and before removing gluten, when I was allegedly bipolar, I took about 500 mgs. a night - now down to 100 to 200 - it's very sedating and ALWAYS knocks me out.

I think people who can't sleep might be able to take just 50 mg. and respond to it quite well.....since the Ambien is no longer working for you, might be worth a try?


SUSIE

Diagnosed January 2006

"I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells." ~Dr. Seuss

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