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Can't Afford To... Can't Afford Not To

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New Pots  

16 members have voted

  1. 1. What would you do?

    • Buy good quality stainless steel for everything and toss your old pots
      9
    • Buy a second set of nonstick and have seperate gluten and gluten free pots
      6
    • Buy an iPad and go ahead and keep using the old pots, the contamination will cookout of them eventually
      1
  2. 2. Frying pan options

    • Buy a cast iron pan for pancakes and such
      5
    • Buy another nonstick pancake pan and hide it from the gluten cookers
      11


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So I'm heading out today to buy new pots. I've been gluten free for almost 6 weeks now and I felt amazing for the first 4 weeks but the last 2 I've been slowly sliding backwards with my symptoms. My husband and I think it might just be my system becoming more sensitive so now I'm reacting to the trace contamination from our 10 year old non-stick pots.

So today I go to spend my Mother's Day money on new pots. (I'm pouting because I wanted an iPad or a new summer wardrobe)

Any thoughts on stainless steel vs. new nonstick? I love cooking on nonstick but I'm thinking that stainless steel has the added benefit of not carrying contamination if someone else in the house uses it to heat up some gluteny soup or pasta. I've never cooked on steel so I'm nervous about that but world class chefs use it so obviously it doesn't suck.

This weekend sucks. I'm having a hard time feeling good about life right now. :(

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So I'm heading out today to buy new pots. I've been gluten free for almost 6 weeks now and I felt amazing for the first 4 weeks but the last 2 I've been slowly sliding backwards with my symptoms. My husband and I think it might just be my system becoming more sensitive so now I'm reacting to the trace contamination from our 10 year old non-stick pots.

So today I go to spend my Mother's Day money on new pots. (I'm pouting because I wanted an iPad or a new summer wardrobe)

Any thoughts on stainless steel vs. new nonstick? I love cooking on nonstick but I'm thinking that stainless steel has the added benefit of not carrying contamination if someone else in the house uses it to heat up some gluteny soup or pasta. I've never cooked on steel so I'm nervous about that but world class chefs use it so obviously it doesn't suck.

This weekend sucks. I'm having a hard time feeling good about life right now. :(

feeling well and being able to enjoy life is SOOOOO much better than a iPad or new summer wardrobe, :D

the new pans will DIFFIDENTLY be worth it, I love my new stainless steel ones but I do have a nonstick frying pan(putting that off limit to gluteney things would be a good idea)

*just a note: shared strainers for reg pasta and gluten free pasta is NOT GOOD,,maybe invest in different styles or colors so there is no chance of a mix up

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While I love my iPad, if I were you, I'd buy some pots. Maybe buy a couple at a time? A 4-quart sauce pan and a 12-inch skillet will make a LOT of different things.

I'd prefer to spend $$$ on stainless steel pots since they last forever and $ on non-stick since they get scratched and lose their stick so quickly. I LOVE my All Clad stainless steel, and I buy it from a place that sells irregulars: http://www.cookwarenmore.com/display.php?cat=48&zid=1&lid=1&cartid=201105141371468 (They have 20% off sales twice a year, so getting on their mailing list can be worth it.)

This non-stick skillet got the highest ratings at Cooks Illustrated: T-Fal Professional Total Nonstick Fry Pan. Calphalon is good, too.

Stainless cookware is really good for browning meat, and it's great for going from stovetop to oven. It's also good for making pan sauces. Nonstick just doesn't do as good a job for these applications. I use my nonstick (two skillets and one griddle) mostly for eggs, pancakes, and a few recipes that specifically call for it. I use stainless much more than nonstick.

Oh, Bar Keeper's friend does a great job of cleaning stainless when it needs an extra cleaning boost.

Good luck! (I'm not looking forward to replacing some cutting boards, bakeware, toaster, and a few other things I've been able to work around so far, so I feel you on this one! I was fortunate that all my cookware was fine.)

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I'm home with a nice 12 piece set of stainless steel pots from Costco. Kirkland Brand but they meet all the requirements I had: thick, multi layer bottoms (in this case steel, aluminum and copper), rivetted handles, at least 10 pieces and under $250 ($189.99).

I also got a cast iron pan.

If this makes a difference then I'll add on a few extra pieces that I don't have like a big wok and a bigger stock/stew pot.

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I got all my new kitchen junk for presents!!!! Iknow I would have loved to do something fun with the money I receive for birthdays, holidays & these gifts were all so NOT personal! But my health was way more important .... I got better so my family had their MOM back ( not sick & cranky) & I was able to cook & bake & everyone was happy.. A win win for my family.....

I have always used stainless steel & love it... Coated pans get scratched through time, I even purchased a skillet from Germany once , it costs $300.00 for one skillet it took all my birthday, holiday money& to buy it guarenteed not toscratch.. Man, I loved that pan but after about five years it too became scratched... I contacted the company for a replacement which they said was lifetime, yea right! They were so willing to send a replacementfor$150.00 ...... I reported them but never received a new pan...

Sometimes we want for things we really didn't need in the first place....enjoy your new cookware..........

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I'm home with a nice 12 piece set of stainless steel pots from Costco. Kirkland Brand but they meet all the requirements I had: thick, multi layer bottoms (in this case steel, aluminum and copper), rivetted handles, at least 10 pieces and under $250 ($189.99).

I also got a cast iron pan.

Cast iron is awesome and we have both a frying pan and a grill pan. Its ability to hold heat is amazing. If you ever find you've got stubborn stuff stuck in it just heat it up scorching hot, throw in 1/3 cup of water and (while wearing a glove) scrape with a spatula. Nothin' survives that steam treatment. As it cools then just scrub out with some kosher salt, lightly oil it, and it's good as new.

If you find you like it then seek out some carbon steel pans for pan frying or cooking sticky stuff like eggs. Once you've gotten used to the (easy!) maintenance of the seasoning you'll never want to use teflon pans again.

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I won't cook on non stick on the stove top. That stuff, when overheated, gives off fumes that can kill pet birds ! :blink: I wish I could more easily find not coated with non- stick cake and bread tins, etc, I've got some cheap - *** ones from China, that the coating CAME OFF ON THE LOAVES OF BREAD when I took them out of the pan - disgusting !

Plus non stick requires wooden or plastic spatulas that are just another potential source of cross contamination if they get into gluten ingredients.

I am a big fan of cast iron pans, and keep several small skillets on the stovetop burner in the back (they're heavy!) and cook on them daily. Keep in mind, tho, you'll have to decontaminate them if they get glutened, also. I use olive oil a lot as I am relatively 'white carbohydrates' intolerant, so any bread- like items like flatbreads tend to be the whole grain, heavier heartier types or things made out of almond meal. If I try to eat low fat it doesn't work for me. Most Americans on a so -called "normal" diet are eating a great deal more of grain servings a day.

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I also don't do non-stick stuff. It's just not needed and it doesn't last even if you are cautious. I mean chefs don't use it and people cooked without fine before it came along. It can be really convenient though. Stuff tends to stick to stainless steel if you aren't used to using it. There is a learning curve when it comes to the heat setting on your stove and what you're cooking. Cast iron can be the same way. It just depends on what you're cooking.

I just have a single medium quality stainless steel "saucepan" with a glass lid I got at Target for around $10.00 but, I don't cook often. I got it on the off chance I want to make a stock/soup, need to cook buffalo/bison, cook/steam oysters, toast some sunflower seeds, or do something else I may ever only do ever so often. It's also just me though so, I understand why other people would need multiple sizes and a higher quality item.

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It's also just me though so, I understand why other people would need multiple sizes and a higher quality item.

Yeah, I cook 3 meals a day for a family of 7 plus I host all the large family gatherings so once a month or so I am cooking for 15-20 people. Good cookware is important.

So far I'm happy with my new pans. Cooking eggs is going to take some practice but maybe I'll just buy a single non stick pancake pan and hide it for eggs and gluten-free pancakes.

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Yeah, I cook 3 meals a day for a family of 7 plus I host all the large family gatherings so once a month or so I am cooking for 15-20 people. Good cookware is important.

So far I'm happy with my new pans. Cooking eggs is going to take some practice but maybe I'll just buy a single non stick pancake pan and hide it for eggs and gluten-free pancakes.

Oh wow lol. Yea, in that situation I would get the highest quality I could find and the largest selection.

I never really got eggs down outside of scrambling or frying them. I could almost get an "omlette" started but then it would just go the scrambled egg route. I rotated them out of my diet before I got to mess around with them to much. It wasn't a big deal though as I always preferred boiled eggs over any other form.

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I never really got eggs down outside of scrambling or frying them. I could almost get an "omlette" started but then it would just go the scrambled egg route. I rotated them out of my diet before I got to mess around with them to much. It wasn't a big deal though as I always preferred boiled eggs over any other form.

I find that (if you don't use nonstick) the only reliable way for omelettes is to have a dedicated omelette pan and do not let anybody :ph34r: use it for anything else.

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I'm not much of a cook and have always had just odds & ends of cookware. Going gluten-free I threw out all of the old stuff and have slowly been adding new everything - pots, pans, glassware, strainer. I even threw away the under the sink bread board. Sort of left a long skinny hole in the cabinet but I feel better. :)

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