Jump to content
  • Sign Up
0
TriciaW

Hidden Valley Ranch Reply

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I was so disappointed with the response I received from Hidden Valley Ranch regarding the source of the maltodextrin in their ranch seasoning and dip mix. I thought I would share for those who might be interested:

"Dear Mrs. W------,

Thank you for contacting us about our Hidden Valley Salad Dressing Mix.

As is the case with many companies, the specific ingredients of our formula are proprietary.

I am sorry I couldn't be more helpful. Again, thank you for contacting us.

Sincerely,

Jewel Santana

Consumer Response Representative

Consumer Services

Did you know: Kids eat more vegetables when they come with Ranch Dressing. "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While the reply is not helpful, I can add to it. If it is maltodextrin that you are concerned about, maltodextrin is so highly refined that even if it was from wheat, there would be no detectable gluten in the maltodextrin, which is a very small part of the dressing. If it WAS wheat-derived, in the USA that fact would have to be clearly disclosed on the label using the exact word "wheat."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was so disappointed with the response I received from Hidden Valley Ranch regarding the source of the maltodextrin in their ranch seasoning and dip mix. I thought I would share for those who might be interested:

"Dear Mrs. W------,

Thank you for contacting us about our Hidden Valley Salad Dressing Mix.

As is the case with many companies, the specific ingredients of our formula are proprietary.

I am sorry I couldn't be more helpful. Again, thank you for contacting us.

Sincerely,

Jewel Santana

Consumer Response Representative

Consumer Services

Did you know: Kids eat more vegetables when they come with Ranch Dressing. "

Take another approach, when contacting companies. Ask if their Hidden Valley Ranch Dressing is gluten free, and what is there allergen policy. I expect their answers will be a bit more fluid.

I buy it all the time, after I read the label. :)

I Googled Hidden Valley Ranch Dressing

http://www.hiddenvalley.com/faq/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sure hope that it is safe. I eat it all the time. It was in a book I bought that tells grocery store items and if they are safe. My nutritionist recommended it. Anyway, it said it was safe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got some in a gift box from the Univ of Chicago Celiac Center. If its not gluten-free, the Celiac Center just made many people sick! What a way to drum up business! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe I read recently that Hidden Valley is about to add "gluten free" to their labels. They said the newly labeled bottles would be out sometime in June, I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got some in a gift box from the Univ of Chicago Celiac Center. If its not gluten-free, the Celiac Center just made many people sick! What a way to drum up business! :D

B) I guess we will see. Karen, keep us updated. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How can Hidden Valley Ranch be gluten-free if it contains modified food starch and MSG?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How can Hidden Valley Ranch be gluten-free if it contains modified food starch and MSG?

Modified food starch is gluten free unless it says wheat. MSG is gluten free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe I read recently that Hidden Valley is about to add "gluten free" to their labels. They said the newly labeled bottles would be out sometime in June, I think.

I also recall reading that article. I almost posted that I had read it but then didn't find it on a quicky google search and was afraid I was imagining things or mistaken. I guess my memory isn't as bad as I feared!

I eat Hidden Valley all the time, if it had gluten I'd know within half an hour.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Modified food starch is gluten free unless it says wheat. MSG is gluten free.

Some people say modified food starch is safe and some do not. This website has it on the unsafe list. If it truly is safe, we could eat more products more cheaply. Where can I find more information?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some people say modified food starch is safe and some do not. This website has it on the unsafe list. If it truly is safe, we could eat more products more cheaply. Where can I find more information?

In the US, if it's made from wheat, it will, legally, have to say so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been on the diet for twelve years now. When I started, MFS was on the warning lists because it could be made from wheat. In my time, I have never found a case where it actually WAS wheat.

During that time, label rules have changed in both Canada and the US. The presence of wheat must now be clearly disclosed using the word "wheat." So MFS is safe unless you see the word "wheat" on the label.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Knowing they were suppose to be updating labels this month to say gluten free I e-mailed them and received this reply this afternoon (I am currently back home in Newfoundland, Canada)...

"Thank you for contacting us.

The FDA requires that we list the following allergens on our ingredient labels:

1. Egg

2. Soybean (excluding high refined oil)

3. Dairy

4. Peanut

5. Wheat (barley, rye, oats, or any source of gluten)

6. Fish

7. Crustacean

8. Tree Nut

For the most accurate source of information, please check the back of the ingredient panel for every purchase as ingredients may change. Additionally, the term "Natural Flavor" is proprietary to our formula however, if any of the allergens listed above were present in the natural flavors it would be called out specifically on the ingredient panel. Further, none of our products are manufactured on dedicated lines.

Again, thank you for contacting us.

Sincerely,

Mayra Linares

Consumer Response Representative

Consumer Services"

How are they claiming gluten free without dedicated lines or at least telling us that they clean them? I'm very confused after that...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How are they claiming gluten free without dedicated lines or at least telling us that they clean them? I'm very confused after that...

I am not up-to-date of the Canadian criteria, but Peter posted it clearly.

But, in the US, the term "gluten free" is voluntary on labels, as no legal definition is standardized at this point. Close, but we're not there yet.

Nothing in life is guaranteed to be gluten free. It's an improbability. So we do our best.

Reading labels works for me, although I know that there is a small group of others that might need to take that extra step regarding shared equipment. I'm not one of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How are they claiming gluten free without dedicated lines or at least telling us that they clean them? I'm very confused after that...

In the US, there is currently no regulated definition of gluten-free, although there is a proposed one from a few years ago. In Canada, there is a clear one.

Good Manufacturing Processes (GMP) are required in both countries. That includes proper washing of equipment between batches. That applies to all products, not just ones claimed as gluten-free.

The regulations in Canada, and federal law (FALCPA) in the US, require the disclosure of top allergens, one of which is wheat. Your post above contains the FALCPA list. Canada currently adds sesame seeds and sulphites to that list. In August, 2012, Canada will add mustard seeds, rye, barley and oats to the list. HOWEVER, in both countries, the rule applies only to ingredients intentionally in the food, and does not address cross-contact issues.

But that is where GMP comes in. GMP make cross-contact much less likely.

Disclosure of shared equipment and/or facilities is completely voluntary in both countries.

In Canada, a "may contain" statement may be on the label if there is sharing, and, despite GMP, there is a risk. An example would be a baked product with no intentional gluten content, baked in the same kitchen as regular wheat-based goods. The possibility of airborne flour can not be controlled. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency explicitly states that such a warning can not be used as a substitute for GMP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Peter for your informative reply. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

×