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Gluten-Free Flour Alternatives by Karen Robertson

Gluten-Free Flours

Celiac.com 01/11/2005 - Gluten-free flours are generally used in combination with one another. There is not one stand alone gluten-free flour that you can use successfully in baked goods. Be sure to know the procedures your flour manufacturers use, cross contamination at the factory can cause diet compliance issues for the gluten intolerant.

Arrowroot Flour can be used cup for cup in place of cornstarch if you are allergic to corn.

Bean Flour is a light flour made from garbanzo and broad beans. To cut the bitter taste of beans, replace white sugar with brown or maple sugar in the recipe(or replace some of the bean flour with sorghum).

Brown Rice Flour is milled from unpolished brown rice and has a higher nutrient value than white rice flour. Since this flour contains bran it has a shorter shelf life and should be refrigerated. As with white rice flour, it is best to combine brown rice flour with several other flours to avoid the grainy texture. Ener-G Foods and Bobs Red Mill produce a finer, lighter brown rice flour that works well with dense cakes such as pound cake.

Cornstarch is similar in usage to sweet rice flour for thickening sauces. Best when used in combination with other flours.

Guar Gum, a binding agent, can be used in place of xanthan gum for corn sensitive individuals. Use half as much guar gum to replace xanthan gum. Guar gum contains fiber and can irritate very sensitive intestines.

Nut Flours are high in protein and, used in small portions, enhances the taste of homemade pasta, puddings, pizza crust, bread, and cookies. Finely ground nut meal added to a recipe also increases the protein content and allows for a better rise. Ground almond meal can replace dry milk powder in most recipes as a dairy-free alternative.

Potato Flour has a strong potato taste and is rarely used in gluten-free cooking.

Potato Starch Flour is used in combination with other flours, rarely used by itself.

Sorghum Flour a relatively new flour that cuts the bitterness of bean flour and is excellent in bean flour mixes.

Soy Flour is high in protein and fat with a nutty flavor. Best when used in small quantities in combination with other flours. Soy flour has a short shelf life.

Sweet Rice Flour is made from glutinous rice (it does not contain the gluten fraction that is prohibited to the gluten intolerant). Often used as a thickening agent. Sweet rice flour is becoming more common in gluten-free baking for tender pies and cakes. It has the ability to smooth the gritty taste (that is common in gluten-free baked goods) when combined with other flours, see Multi Blend recipe.

Tapicoa Starch Flour is a light, velvety flour from the cassava root. It lightens gluten-free baked goods and gives them a texture more like that of wheat flour baked goods. It is especially good in pizza crusts where it is used in equal parts with either white rice flour or brown rice flour.

White Rice Flour is milled from polished white rice, best to combine with several other flours to avoid the grainy texture rice flour alone imparts. Try to buy the finest texture of white rice flour possible.

Xanthan Gum is our substitute for gluten, it holds things together. See usage information on Multi Blend recipe page. Xanthan gum is derived from bacteria in corn sugar, the corn sensitive person should use guar gum (using half as much guar gum to replace xanthan gum).

Alternative Flours

The national patient support groups agree that the following flours are fine for the gluten intolerant providing you can find a pure source (grown in dedicated fields and processed on dedicated equipment). These flours greatly improve the taste of gluten-free baked goods. To incorporate into your favorite recipe, replace up to 50% of the flour in a recipe with an alternative flour and use the Multi Blend mix for the balance. Pizza crust and bread proportions dont follow this rule.

Amaranth a whole grain from the time of the Aztecs- it is high in protein and contains more calcium, fiber, magnesium, Vitamin A and Vitamin C than most grains. Amaranth has a flavor similar to graham crackers without the sweetness.

Buckwheat is the seed of a plant related to rhubarb, it is high in fiber, protein, magnesium and B vitamins. Dark buckwheat flour turns baked goods purple, I only use light buckwheat flour.

Millet a small, round grain that is a major food source in Asia, North Africa and India.
I havent used millet and dont know much about the grain.

Quinoa (keen-wah) A staple food of the Incas. Quinoa is a complete protein with all 8 amino acids, quinoa contains a fair amount of calcium and iron.

Teff an ancient grain from Ethiopia, now grown in Idaho. Teff is always a whole grain flour since it is difficult to sift or separate. High in protein, B vitamins, calcium, and iron.

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18 Responses:

 
Magda
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said this on
29 Oct 2007 8:02:57 AM PST
Thank you for this site!!!!

 
Kiesy Strauchon
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said this on
03 Nov 2007 9:12:31 PM PST
Very well-written and helpful. I'd love to purchase Karen's book; I've borrowed it from a library but would love to have my own copy. Thank-you for this article.

 
Michelle
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said this on
24 Nov 2007 2:33:15 PM PST
VERY helpful. Thanks

 
j spangler
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said this on
06 Dec 2007 1:21:15 PM PST
Thanks for the great info, it is exactly what I've been looking for!

 
araceli Kudrle
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said this on
08 Dec 2007 7:01:55 PM PST
Very Informative!

 
diane
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said this on
25 Jan 2008 8:43:31 AM PST
This gives me hope! Thanks very much. I'm not alone...

 
Martha H Rudman
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said this on
06 Feb 2008 12:22:28 PM PST
GREAT article--love to bake, recently diagnosed, can really use this info.

 
Toby Schubert
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said this on
11 Mar 2008 6:13:13 PM PST
Would SO appreciate Karen's suggestion on what she would use for a roux for beef burgundy...to thicken sauce.

 
Debbie
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said this on
09 Apr 2008 8:28:54 PM PST
If you are using a gluten free flour such as sweet rice flour, how does this affect diabetes? Does this increase the sugar consumption?

 
barbara odom
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said this on
17 Apr 2008 4:22:37 PM PST
I'm looking forward to the ongoing recipes & new info. THANKS so much!

 
Marzena P
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said this on
18 Jun 2008 4:40:48 PM PST
After many years of ??? I now know what the problem is thanks to a good Polish doctor. Great informative web site on Celiac. Thanks, Marzena

 
Amber Letz
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said this on
10 Sep 2008 7:24:05 AM PST
I needed information on Brown Rice Flour and this was very helpful.

 
Dawn
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said this on
19 Oct 2008 3:22:42 PM PST
I have sensitivities to many things and I have found that you can use just brown rice flour in baked goods successfully if you use yogurt in place of half the wet ingredients. (I use soy yogurt) I cannot use xanthan or guar gums, cornstarch or arrowroot. So I wanted to share that in case there is someone else out there just as frustrated.

 
Karen Robertson
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said this on
16 Jul 2009 3:52:25 PM PST
Debbie,
My box of sweet rice flour shows 0g for sugars but 24g for carbs for an amount of 3 tablespoons.

 
Karen Robertson
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said this on
16 Jul 2009 3:55:26 PM PST
Kiesy,
the book is in its' 3rd revision and will be out on DVD in early August. you can print recipes exactly as they look in the book on your home computer.

 
Karen Robertson
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said this on
16 Jul 2009 4:01:25 PM PST
Toby,
A good thickener is mixing 3 tablespoons of sweet rice flour with 1 1/2 cups red wine. Add just a little wine at first to the sweet rice flour, mix well and slowly add in the rest of the wine. I have also made roux's for gravy that call for a few tablespoons of melted butter mixed with a tablespoon of sweet rice flour.

 
jennifer Lynn
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said this on
26 Sep 2009 1:58:37 AM PST
Very good report

 
Valerie
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said this on
18 Apr 2016 1:37:12 PM PST
How do I use the sweet rice flour for cake? What else would I use with it? Need it before the weekend so I have time to attempt it first.




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