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Open Letter to the many GI sufferers Part 2 still suffering Look Beyond these symptom’s to the Parent Disease Pellagra with these many unruly children like IBS, GERD, UC, etc. up to and including NCGS and Celiac Disease (in Time I believe) Part 2

In Part 1 I mentioned many of the GI issues diseases I think this might help and have seen it help.

But most people only think of an “official diagnosis” and not co-morbidities in the same person.

Treating your Vitamin deficiency lets you treat your co-morbidities.

It is known as a 2ndary diagnosis in Sjorgen’s diesease as Pellagra has also been diagnosed

with SJD for example.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263324686_Pellagra_in_a_patient_with_primary_Sjogren's_syndrome

Despite the conditions responding to Niacin(amide) --- Pellagra was still considered the 2ndary disease.

This is more common than people realize often.

You hear often “you” the average person doesn’t need to take a Vitamin but if you are reading

this blog you are not average. People with Celiac disease and other GI problems are known to be

low in a range of Vitamins.

See this link for appropriate supplementation with a celiac diagnosis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24195595

Niacin(amide) was not mentioned in this study but should be added/studied since

B-Vitamins are known to help Celiac’s.

At 58% co-morbidity of Pellagra in Celiac’s there is better than 50/50 chance your symptom’s

can be in remission in 6 months? If you are ONE of the many Pellagrins being diagnosed as Celiac disease today.

Gluten free works actually summarizes this topic well.

https://glutenfreeworks.com/blog/2017/07/18/niacin-vitamin-b3-deficiency-in-celiac-disease/

But still people are afraid to take a water soluble Vitamin that is known to help digestion problems.

Are you Afraid of a Vitamin? You needn’t bee! Praise bee to God!

I must always say *** This is not medical advice and should not be considered such. Results may vary.

Always consult your doctor before making any changes to your medical regimen but it helped me.

And I think it can help you too and why I share for “Sharing is Caring”.

2 Timothy 2: 7 “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included.

Posterboy by the Grace of God,

 

*****Addendum I mean this to be some kind of “Opus”. My story! Yours might be different.

Now the onus is on you to try?

What you can do is urge your doctor to have you tested for Pellagra (though I doubt very seriously

you will test low). See this posterboy blog post that explains the difference in Primary and 2ndary Pellagra.

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/blogs/entry/2119-a-devastating-delay-celiac-pellagra-and-the-implementation-clinical-gap-in-recognizing-one-forover-the-other-which-twin-to-choosesave/

Anyone who eats a protein rich diet will not test low enough to be diagnosed as a Pellagrin

at least in the Western world.

You have bee near death, an alcoholic or homeless to be diagnosed as a Pellagrin today or

maybe an alcoholic homeless fellow who has severe Psorsias. . . might test positive for Pellagra

if they knew to test for it.

And why it usually shows up in war torn areas today because protein is limited in war. (and Alcoholics)

as seen in this House MD episode on Celiacs called Forever because Alcoholics have poor diets and

thus low in protein in their diets.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=house+season+2+episode+22+forever+daily+motion&view=detail&mid=C2050653028DE02DBDE6C2050653028DE02DBDE6&FORM=VIRE

What needs to be done to change this oft over looked fact is a study with Niacin to see if it helps Celiac’s.

See here where other B-Vitamins were shown to help Celiac’s.

https://www.celiac.com/articles/21783/1/B-Vitamins-Beneficial-for-Celiacs-on-Gluten-Free-Diet/Page1.html

this study was only as to how it (B-Vitamin supplementation) effects homeocysteine levels in people

diagnosed with Celiac disease.

Not if taking a B-complex or specifically the Niacinamide version of Niacin could help treat or

alleviate gluten antibodies in Celiacs with cross contamination.

A double blind study would have to be done but could be effectively tested with some time and effort.

This is only antidotal information with no confirmed medical research unless someone else takes the

ball and runs with it.

Plumbago you come to mind. But it doesn’t matter who it is.

The time has come to test this hypothesis to see if it is a “working theory”. I only know it helped me

and helps other I give the Vitamin B-3 as Niacinamide to . . . up to and including people who have

had an official NCGS diagnosis. Which tells’ me it would help other Celiac’s too if they would try it

(Niaciamide) 3/day for 6 months.

Note: No Follow up is done at two years to see if they are in remission after cross contamination

or if they have adhered strictly to a gluten free diet. But their clinical outcomes (symptom relief) appear

to greatly improve at 6 months including re-introducing problem foods such as dairy which they now

tolerate without GI distress.

I have tried to be a witness to what I have experienced.

(I speak as a man) that no other person Pellagin being diagnosed as Celiac disease instead would be

in the dark about this fact.

Romans 10:13-15 King James Version (KJV)

13 For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.

14 How then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? and how shall they believe in him

of whom they have not heard? and how shall they hear without a preacher?

15 And how shall they preach, except they be sent? as it is written, How beautiful are the feet of them

that preach the gospel of peace, and bring glad tidings of good things!

When you get the right/correct diagnosis (if Pellagra is correct/parent diagnosis) it’s unruly child

Celiac will get better.

See this posterboy celiac.com blog post.

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/blogs/entry/2124-is-non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity-andor-celiac-disease-really-pellagra-in-disguise-in-the-21st-century-a-thoughtful-review-of-whether-to-supplement-or-to-not-supplement-by-the-posterboy-of-both-celiac-and-pellagra-a-fellow-sufferers-journey-to-peace/

I only know it is a devastating delay. To ignore one disease at the expense of the other.

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/blogs/entry/2119-a-devastating-delay-celiac-pellagra-and-the-implementation-clinical-gap-in-recognizing-one-forover-the-other-which-twin-to-choosesave/

quoting the celiac posterboy again

“A differential diagnosis is one of the best standard of medicine rarely practiced today and how

specialists decide between competing diseases like UC or Chron’s or IBS or Celiac Disease and

if I am right Co-Morbid Pellagra now forgotten for 75+ years since the “War on Pellagra” is now over

according to medical professionals’ but sadly the battle rages on for at least for the potential

3 Million American’s who are now being diagnosed as Celiac disease today instead.”

AS someone who has had BOTH Celiac and Pellagra. I can tell you that it can be difficult to tell them

apart sometimes (most times).

What we fail to understand often with any diagnosis there is continuum of disease/symptoms.

Yet we think of them as separate diseases Right?

I have unwittingly become the Celiac and Pellagra Posterboy .

Learn from my mistakes!

I have made too many (mistakes) to count.

Take as much honey (knowledge) as you can from my mistakes so bad (lack of knowledge) health

will not sting your quality of life.

So let’s say. Today they find a miraculous cure for Celiac disease or NCGS. . . it would take on average

17 years for doctor’s in Clinical settings to apply these technique’s to eradicate new Celiac

cases/diagnosis’s from occurring.

Now in this hypothetical case (which doesn’t exist yet or does IT? As a differential diagnosis

the answer is a definite YES) it would take another 17 years on average for doctors if they knew

today that Pellagra (which they don’t) can mimic Celiac disease in a Clinical setting.

But one does exist (it is not hypothetical) – a cure for Pellagra exists today. It has in fact existed

for 100+ years and still doctors don’t recognize it today.

I share/write these posterboy blog post’s so that others might not have to suffer the same things’

I have again in the future someday. . . I pray soon!

Now that you have the knowledge of my experience what will you do with it?

Every hour/patient/person matters.

And why I have tried diligently to educate other Celiac’s of this maddening fact.

All those who have ears to hear may they listen!

Feel free to read all my posterboy blog post’s if this pique’s your curiosity/interest but there

is only so much in a/one blog post than can be explained but it really Is not necessary

or visit the website/blog in my profile where I have told the same story hundreds of time that

ONE fellow sufferer like myself may/might be helped by the same wisdom, I found God being my help,

when I learned Pellagra and Celiac disease are Siamese twins and separating one

(supplementing one to death) will kill the other (cause the other to go into remission).

And I believe you can too! Praise bee to God!

2 Corinthians (KJV) 1:3,4

3) “Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies,

and the God of all comfort;

4) who comforteth us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort them (fellow sufferer)

which are in any trouble,

by the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God.”

Posterboy by the Grace of God,

 

EPILOGUE

A simple self-test is to prove this works for you and your friends.

It is to take Niacin as NIACINAMIDE usually one 300 count bottle is enough for a 3month supply.

I call it the NIACINAMIDE CHALLENGE.

You and a friend/family member begin taking it at the same rate.

Whatever that rate is – is fine.

But it needs to be at the same rate – consistently.

2/day or 3/day works (i.e., with each meal) works for most people.

If so two things will happen for you/them (if Pellagra is indeed Co-Morbid presenting

as Celiac Disease) then you/they will begin BURPING for the first time in years and years

(if at all) and their stool will begin to SINK to the bottom of the bowl.

***Not twenty minutes after eating something with bloating or burping with carbonation/soda

or beer etc. but BURPING 2 hours after a meal without the bloating you used to have.

It will start slowly and then be your new normal. The burping within a month of each other

will match up with your stool beginning to SINK where it did not before (or it did for me).

A witness of two is “true”.

Usually it takes 3 to 4 months taking the Niacinamide 1/day to notice these results

Usually it takes 2 to 3 months taking the Niacinamide 2/day to notice these results

Usually it takes 6 weeks to 2 months taking the Niacinamide 3/day to notice these results

If these are your results then together ya’ll have completed a self-test to confirm Pellagra was

causing your GI problems.

If it is the Vitamin making the difference your GI symptoms’ will improve. It is as simple as that.

I would recommend a 6 months regimen for most people. Two 300 count bottles equal

$50 Dollars worth of a B-Vitamin.

As I called this an open a letter to the many GI sufferers etc.

It doesn’t matter what part phase (spectrum) of the disease you are in it will (should) get better.

GERD, IBS, UC, NCGS or even Celiac disease if (low Niacin(amide) was the cause) you will have a

cause and effect reaction.

If you had Pellagra Co-Morbid and your GI improves with supplementation.

This almost always works if you are not now taking PPI’s like Nexium or Prilosec etc. . . .

If you are taking PPI’s then your “Way Back” may be a little longer but the trip back is the same.

****Again this is not medical advice but it is too cheap not to try and see if it works for you . . .

I have found it work for others.

****Note: I am only reporting what medical journals have concluded. It is just not well understood

today one disease is being diagnosed as the other because it can take a generation for this knowledge

to filter down to the clinical level.

Again a “Witness of Two” – you Both having the same reaction to the Vitamin proves Pellagra

was causing your symptom’s and the doctor’s don’t recognize it today in a Clinical setting.

The Journal of Psychosomatics says its well and I can’t say it better.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S003331821070668X?via%3Dihub

quoting the abstract

Pellagra: An Old Enemy of Timeless Importance Author links open overlay panelThomas M.BrownM.D.

Show more https://doi.org/10.1016/S0033-3182(10)70668-XGet rights and content

Background

“In the United States, pellagra is infrequently reported. Yet this disorder does occur among

malnourished persons.

Objective

The author seeks to clarify diagnosis and treatment.

Method

The author describes various presentations and effects of this disorder.

Results

Knowledge of classic and atypical presentations can assist in making the diagnosis.

The author presents two cases of pellagra that exemplify the classic and atypical presentations.

Conclusion

The typically robust response of the disorder to physiologic doses of niacin

can assist in confirming the diagnosis.”

*** This is not medical advice and should not be considered such. Results may vary.

Always consult your doctor before making any changes to your medical regimen.

But I am your witness people, have and do get better using this technique realizing a mistake

has been made in your/their diagnosis. It is the time honored medical

“Second Opinion” AKA a Differential Diagnosis.

Isn’t it about time to see if supplementing with Niacinamide will help your co-morbid Pellagra

symptom’s to see if your Celiac disease diagnosis was arrived at in error – no matter well intended

has keep you from getting better from Pellagra.

Quoting an old friend J. Dan Gill when he talks about the power of Truth to Free us!

Where/when he (Dan) talks about the difference between Truth and Error.

“The Truth is Always Better

The Truth, whatever it is,

Is always better than error,

Whatever it is.”

By J. Dan Gill

The truth is when an error/mistake is made. Admit it and move on to the correct/better

diagnosis so you can then get better!

And we have known how to treat Pellagra for a 100+ years but this generation having not

seen it in their lifetimes have forgot how to diagnose it! When they see it in its earliest forms. ..

they do not recognize it in a clinical setting anymore!

Those that have ears to hear? Listen! You can get better from Co-morbid Pellagra.

SADLY! Few listen. But some (Celiac’s) have heard (listened to) the good news that

Pellagra is reversible and have gotten better. Don’t be the Last!

****Again this is not medical advice but it is too easy, simple and cheap not too try

and see if it works for you too!. . . I have found it works for others. . . not already taking a

Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPIs) like Nexium or Prilosec etc . . .

Praise bee to God! To those who have listened and got better!

Just trying to help those still suffering (I believe) unnecessarily.

2 Corinthians (KJV) 1:3,4 3) “Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,

the Father of mercies, and the God of all comfort; 4) who comforteth us in all our tribulation,

that we may be able to comfort them which are in any trouble, by the comfort wherewith

we ourselves are comforted of God.”

Posterboy by the Grace of God,

2 Timothy 2:7 “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included.

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    You can also add about ½ cup of this granola to your favorite bran muffins, cookies, or quick breads.  The granola supplies a nice crunch and additional flavor and nutrients.  Depending on your recipe, you may need to add more liquid to compensate for the cereal.  
    Quinoa cereals by Altiplano Gold are packaged in individual serving packets, making them especially easy to incorporate into our baking.  They come in three flavors––Organic Oaxacan Chocolate, Spiced Apple Raisin, and Chai Almond––and just need boiled water to make a hot cereal.  Quinoa is a powerhouse of nutrients so I like to use the cereals in additional ways as well.
    Using the same concept for the fruit crisp above, I just sprinkle the Spiced Apple Raisin or Chai Almond dry cereal on the prepared fruit filling.  Since the cereal is already sweetened and flavored, it only needs a little cooking spray.  Bake at 350°F for 15-20 minutes.  If your fruit needs additional cooking time (such as apples) try the microwave method I discuss above.
    You can add ½ cup of the Chocolate flavor to a batch of chocolate brownies or chocolate cookies for added fiber and nutrients.  Depending on the recipe, you may need to add a little extra liquid to compensate for the cereal which counts as a dry ingredient. 
    Creative Uses of Crackers in Home Cooking
    New crackers by the whimsical name of Mary’s Gone Crackers are chock-full of fiber and nutrients.  They come in Original and Caraway flavors and are a nutritious treat by themselves.  I also take them with me on trips because they travel so well. 
    One creative way to use these crackers and appease your sweet tooth is to dip the whole Original-flavor cracker halfway into melted chocolate.  Ideally, let the chocolate-dipped crackers cool on waxed paper (if you can wait that long) or else just pop them into your mouth as you dip them.  You can also place a few crackers on a microwave-safe plate, top each with a few gluten-free chocolate chips and microwave on low power until the chips soften.  Let them cool slightly so the chocolate doesn’t burn your mouth.  These crackers also work great with dips and spreads. 
    Aside from dipping in chocolate, these crackers have additional uses in baking.  For example, finely crush the Original or Caraway flavor crackers in your food processor and use them as the base for a crumb crust for a quiche or savory tart.  The Original flavor would also work great as a replacement for the pretzels typically used for the crust in a margarita pie.  Just follow your crumb crust recipe and substitute the ground crackers for the crackers or pretzels. 
    The crackers have very little sugar, but the Original flavor will work as a crumb crust for a sweet dessert as well.  Again, just follow your favorite recipe which will probably call for melted butter or margarine plus sugar.  Press the mixture into a pie plate and bake at 350°F for 10 minutes to set the crust.  Fill it with a no-bake pudding, custard, or fresh fruit.
    The crushed crackers can also be added to breads and muffins for a fiber and nutrient boost.  Depending on how much you add (I recommend starting with ½ cup) you may need to add more liquid to the recipe.  
    I’ve just given you some quick ideas for ways to get more grains into your diet and streamline your cooking at the same time.  Here is an easy version of the Apple Crisp I discuss in this article.  I bet you can think of some other opportunities to make our gluten-free diet even healthier with wholesome cereals and crackers. 
    Carol Fenster’s Amazing Apple Crisp
    You may use pears or peaches in place of the apples in this easy home-style dessert. If you prefer more topping, you can double the topping ingredients. This dish is only moderately sweet; you may use additional amounts of sweetener if you wish. Cereals by Enjoy Life Foods and Altiplano Gold work especially well in this recipe. The nutrient content of this dish will vary depending on the type of fruit and cereals used.
    Filling ingredients:
    3 cups sliced apples (Gala, Granny Smith, or your choice) 2 Tablespoons juice (apple, orange)   2 Tablespoons maple syrup  (or more to taste) ½ teaspoon cornstarch  1 teaspoon vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon salt Topping ingredients:
    ¼ cup ready-made cereal ¼ cup gluten-free flour blend of choice ¼ cup finely chopped nuts 2 Tablespoons maple syrup  (or more to taste) 2 Tablespoons soft butter or margarine 1 teaspoon vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon salt Directions:
    1.  Preheat oven to 375F.  Toss all filling ingredients in 8 x 8-inch greased pan. 
    2. In small bowl, combine topping ingredients. Sprinkle over apple mixture. Cover with foil; bake 25 minutes. Uncover; bake another 15 minutes or until topping is crisp. Top with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream, if desired.  Serves 6.

    Jefferson Adams
    Nestlé Debuts Gluten-Free Snack Bar Line Called
    Celiac.com 10/12/2018 - Snack giant Nestlé has announced the debut of a new line of gluten-free snack bars called "Yes!"
    The bars are made with combinations of fruits, vegetables, and nuts, and will contain no artificial sweeteners, flavors, colors or preservatives. Some bars do contain added sugar, but those made with fruits and vegetables do not. 
    The bars come in five flavors: Delicious Beetroot & Apple; Lively Lemon, Quinoa & Chilli; Tempting Sea Salt Dark Choc & Almond; Sumptuous Cranberry & Dark Choc; Delightful Coffee; and Dark Choc & Cherry.
    Yes! bars will be available in UK and Ireland. All Yes! bars are suitable for vegetarians, while the fruit and vegetable versions are vegan-friendly.
    No word yet on whether Nestlé plans to bring Yes! bars to the U.S. any time soon. 

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    • Thank you so much for the Mayo study. I was diagnosed with Mineres over 30 years ago. I had two very frightening episodes of vertigo where I fell straight to the floor. I didn’t believe I had it because it never happened again for years. Never had anything close to vertigo until now. I was complaining for 10 years (2009) that something was wrong with my stomach. Describing attacks and excruciating pain, unlike anything I have ever experienced. Drs dismisses it as my stomach gets full or early satiety. I finally switched drs and my new dr suspected Celiac and did a simple blood test. I tested 100% on all tests including Casein as well. It was like a switch overnight. I started all the gluten free foods but forgot about my sodium problem and now I think the Mineres has reared it’s ugly head in a much milder form if you can believe it. I had several bloood tests done and the dr wants me to do Vestibular testing (spinning).  I’m waiting for the blood tests and want to see the sodium result. I’ve been eating a lot of natural veggies and fruit lately tying to get the sodium out of my system.
    • Gland you are feeling better. I don't know if this is relevant or not but an abnormal immune response and allergies are listed as a cause of Meniere's disease on the mayoclinic website.  https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menieres-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20374910
    • Thank you for reaching out. My Vertigo has finally given me relief. The spinning is less frequent. I started Flonase two days ago and believe it is helping me. I am able to get back to work and not have the fear of Vertigo. I’m still unsteady but manageable. I want to thank everyone for their support, it really means a lot to me! Cindy
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    • Try cooking meals in batches on your days off.  Keep in the frig or freeze small portions.  Planning meals makes it so much easier on a tight schedule.  I know this seems like lame advice, but it is true.   I found  this You Tuber (no personal connection, just selected one with many views).     Of course, modify for gluten free and your other food intolerances.   You can pack some great lunches too.   Happy meal prepping or You Tube surfing!    
    • I have a ton of issues and make nut butters and eat them, it is very dense calorie wise (190-220 calories for 2tbsp). I blend into shakes, mix with coconut and almond flour for nut meal porridge. I do mostly soft foods for ease of digestion. I also use vegan protein powders in my shakes/porridge. I used to use a blendtec or a food processor but invested in a stone mill 4-5 years ago. Some nuts can be made into butters easy like pecan, macadamia, walnuts. Just light roast if raw 270-300F for 18-20 mins then process until smooth in 8-16oz batches and store in a jar. Nuts.com might be good for you. I use other sources as I have issues with peanuts, corn also which they often have CC with.
      Avocados are also a nice source of healthy fats and calorie dense...very versatile from spreads, spoon, shakes, and even make nicecream and mousse out of them.

      I follow a keto based diet myself, but do not eat much meat or egg yolks (issues with breaking them down) so I live on egg whites, nuts, seeds, avocados ,and leafy green veggies.
    • Perfect Advice. 100% agree with cyclinglady
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