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I thought maybe my intestines were healing since i gained about 20 pounds since I have been on a gluten-free diet for 2 years. However, tests show that I have inflammation in my body. Can your intestines still heal or can you gain weight if there is still inflammation in your intestines?

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Have you had follow-up testing since your celiac disease diagnosis?

Here is a link to the University of Chicago's celiac website regarding follow-up care:

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/CDCFactSheets7_PostDiagnosis.pdf

You stated that tests show inflammation in the body. Are you assuming that inflammation would be in your intestinal tract? What about other parts of your body? Many of us go on to develop other autoimmune diseases, diabetes or heart disease. What did your doctor say?


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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On August 10, 2015 at 6:08 PM, sella said:

I thought maybe my intestines were healing since i gained about 20 pounds since I have been on a gluten-free diet for 2 years. However, tests show that I have inflammation in my body. Can your intestines still heal or can you gain weight if there is still inflammation in your intestines?

I would like to know if you have found out the source of your inflammation yet. I'm gluten free three years but my inflammation test was high.

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1 hour ago, katesyl said:

I would like to know if you have found out the source of your inflammation yet. I'm gluten free three years but my inflammation test was high.

katesyl.........this is an older topic so the OP most likely won't answer.  I can, however, offer a piece of advice for you. Just going gluten free will probably not drive your inflammation markers down into normal.  It does depend on how high they were to begin with but with all autoimmune diseases, there will be inflammation going on forever.  Get used to wonky blood work because most of us will have that issue.

I have 4 autoimmune diseases in total and, although I have driven certain inflammatory markers way down, my recent sed rate number was elevated.  The normal is supposed to be 30 and under in a woman my age but mine is 50.  With 4 AI diseases, I doubt it will ever be normal and I don't let it bother me. I am not willing to take major meds at all and use more natural anti-inflammatory supplements.  You can do whatever you feel comfortable with in regards to treatment but don't expect normal numbers with Celiac Disease. Inflammation will improve but normal?  Most people never get there completely.

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21 hours ago, Gemini said:

katesyl.........this is an older topic so the OP most likely won't answer.  I can, however, offer a piece of advice for you. Just going gluten free will probably not drive your inflammation markers down into normal.  It does depend on how high they were to begin with but with all autoimmune diseases, there will be inflammation going on forever.  Get used to wonky blood work because most of us will have that issue.

I have 4 autoimmune diseases in total and, although I have driven certain inflammatory markers way down, my recent sed rate number was elevated.  The normal is supposed to be 30 and under in a woman my age but mine is 50.  With 4 AI diseases, I doubt it will ever be normal and I don't let it bother me. I am not willing to take major meds at all and use more natural anti-inflammatory supplements.  You can do whatever you feel comfortable with in regards to treatment but don't expect normal numbers with Celiac Disease. Inflammation will improve but normal?  Most people never get there completely.

Thank you for this response! You are right, I'm sure.

My sed rate was normal. My c reactive protein was 6, which is high. My platelets were a bit elevated and I was slightly anemic.

I am going tomorrow for another endoscopy. I know that these things could be related to other things... but I'm thinking there is a change they are all still related to celiac (I'm hoping).

What other autoimmune disease do you have, if you don't mind me asking?

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If you are going for an endoscopy, then please ask for a celiac antibodies COMPLETE panel.  This will help you determine if you have been diet compliant (zapped by hidden sources of gluten or accidental cross contamination) and if your doctor misses the (possible) damaged areas during the procedure.    That way you can rule out celiac disease and THEN worry about the possibility of other AI issues.  

I did this last summer.  I got really sick.  My GI thought SIBO right off the bat.  But I asked just to be tested for celiac disease.  Sure enough, I had elevated antibodies.  No need to test for SIBO or anything else at that point.  I just waited a few months for symptoms to subside.  

Good Luck to you!  


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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22 hours ago, Gemini said:

katesyl.........this is an older topic so the OP most likely won't answer.  I can, however, offer a piece of advice for you. Just going gluten free will probably not drive your inflammation markers down into normal.  It does depend on how high they were to begin with but with all autoimmune diseases, there will be inflammation going on forever.  Get used to wonky blood work because most of us will have that issue.

I have 4 autoimmune diseases in total and, although I have driven certain inflammatory markers way down, my recent sed rate number was elevated.  The normal is supposed to be 30 and under in a woman my age but mine is 50.  With 4 AI diseases, I doubt it will ever be normal and I don't let it bother me. I am not willing to take major meds at all and use more natural anti-inflammatory supplements.  You can do whatever you feel comfortable with in regards to treatment but don't expect normal numbers with Celiac Disease. Inflammation will improve but normal?  Most people never get there completely.

Couldn't have said it better!  


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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1 hour ago, katesyl said:

Thank you for this response! You are right, I'm sure.

My sed rate was normal. My c reactive protein was 6, which is high. My platelets were a bit elevated and I was slightly anemic.

I am going tomorrow for another endoscopy. I know that these things could be related to other things... but I'm thinking there is a change they are all still related to celiac (I'm hoping).

What other autoimmune disease do you have, if you don't mind me asking?

I have Celiac, Hashi's thyroid disease, Sjogren's Syndrome and Reynaud's Syndrome.  All have gotten better, inflammation wise, after 11 years gluten free.  I am very strict with my diet, never take chances if I feel the food is not really gluten free and limit the number of times I go out to eat.  I am not saying I never go out but it is normal for my husband and I to not see the inside of a restaurant for 3-4 months at a time and then I only eat at the places that have never glutened me.  I am lucky in that the state I live in has 3 restaurant chains that are run/owned by Celiac's, so they get it right every time.

You have not been gluten free for very long, in reality.  It took me three years to completely rid myself of all symptoms related to the disease.  I was 46 at the time of diagnosis.  I know it is hard to accept that healing can take that long but you have to measure it differently.  Looking back, you should feel better than you did a year ago.  As time goes on, healing slowly takes place until you realize that certain problems have disappeared.  It is not as cut and dried as taking an antibiotic for an infection.

http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART03424/Elevated-Creactive-Protein-CRP.html  Read this article on elevated c reactive protein. It is by Dr. Weil, who is a Harvard trained physician who chose to go the more natural route to healing people.  All his stuff is interesting.  Yes, your elevated level will most likely come down, as you heal better.  Pay attention to it but don't let it freak you out too much!  :)

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23 minutes ago, cyclinglady said:

If you are going for an endoscopy, then please ask for a celiac antibodies COMPLETE panel.  This will help you determine if you have been diet compliant (zapped by hidden sources of gluten or accidental cross contamination) and if your doctor misses the (possible) damaged areas during the procedure.    That way you can rule out celiac disease and THEN worry about the possibility of other AI issues.  

I did this last summer.  I got really sick.  My GI thought SIBO right off the bat.  But I asked just to be tested for celiac disease.  Sure enough, I had elevated antibodies.  No need to test for SIBO or anything else at that point.  I just waited a few months for symptoms to subside.  

Good Luck to you!  

What she said!   ;)  The antibody panel is an important part of follow-up!

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