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Alaskaguy

Potential Pitfalls even on Fasano Diet?

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Hello All,

As you may have read in my other recent threads, as of a couple of days ago I have decided to try the Fasano Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet, for at least three or four months, to both try to resolve my recurring dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), and to help me determine which (if any) conventionally-considered gluten-free foods might have been causing me these ongoing problems (suspects are purity protocol oats, teff, corn, eggs, and/or buckwheat).

Given that I am doing this for DH, I apparently also have to avoid any high-iodine foods, so I will be eliminating iodized salt, all dairy products (both the iodized salt and the dairy products I actually already gave up seven months ago), all seafoods, and most eggs (I might use one or two in a meatloaf, that'd be about it).

The guidelines of the diet state that any fresh and whole fruit and vegetable, and all fresh and unprocessed meats, should be OK. 

My question for anyone is this: are there any OTHER potential pitfalls or problem foods that I should avoid on this Fasano Diet, keeping DH in mind?

For example, the guidelines seem to allow potatoes and tomatoes, although I have read that some people have problems with nightshade family vegetables --- potatoes, peppers, tomatoes, eggplant.  Elsewhere, I have read indications that foods high in oxalates might be a problem for others --- chocolate (I was going to avoid anyway), spinach, rhubarb, etc.  And in yet another reference, I have read that for some people, vegetables from the carrot/parsley family ---- carrots, celery, parsnips --- can be problematic.

Obviously, I cannot avoid ALL of these potentially problematic foods, or I'd be left with just water!  So I'm just wondering if anyone has any good advice for what I should watch for on this diet, again taking into account that I am doing it to resolve DH and not any gastrointestinal symptoms (which all cleared up long ago for me).  Thanks as always.

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My advice?

Don't borrow problems. Cross that bridge when you come to it IF you come to it. We are all individuals & as such react individually. Yes, some have huge problems with corn. That doesn't mean everyone does or even 50% do or even 25% do. I will say that corn is probably higher on the suspect list if one is having problems. 

Seriously, we have enough problems with what we have problems with that we don't need to circumvent things we may well be able to eat with abandon. For instance, I never did have any problem with digesting dairy of any sort. However, if you read on here, people are often told as if it is a flat out given, that they should ditch the dairy b/c they won't be able to handle it. Now it is true, many can't at first but many of us can. We shouldn't be afraid of food. We shouldn't be afraid of foods in the nightshade family or the oxalate family or salicylates. IF you find yourself having issues then you can eliminate but I don't think you need to eliminate anything other than the items you named in your first 2 paragraphs above. 

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24 minutes ago, squirmingitch said:

My advice?

Don't borrow problems. Cross that bridge when you come to it IF you come to it. We are all individuals & as such react individually. Yes, some have huge problems with corn. That doesn't mean everyone does or even 50% do or even 25% do. I will say that corn is probably higher on the suspect list if one is having problems. 

Seriously, we have enough problems with what we have problems with that we don't need to circumvent things we may well be able to eat with abandon. For instance, I never did have any problem with digesting dairy of any sort. However, if you read on here, people are often told as if it is a flat out given, that they should ditch the dairy b/c they won't be able to handle it. Now it is true, many can't at first but many of us can. We shouldn't be afraid of food. We shouldn't be afraid of foods in the nightshade family or the oxalate family or salicylates. IF you find yourself having issues then you can eliminate but I don't think you need to eliminate anything other than the items you named in your first 2 paragraphs above. 

SI, to be honest, I was somewhat being a devil's advocate in my first post of this thread when mentioning those other foods.  But I am intending to do just as you say, and not try to worry about oddball potential sensitivities that I MIGHT have in addition to gluten.

I think I will stay away from eating any more asparagus, and spinach also, though.

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In my non-professional experience, most gluten-free individuals are gluten-free, dairy-free and soy-free - what I call the “trifecta”. Wish more food manufacturers and Gluten-free or celiac-friendly restaurants would pay attention to this. Corn is also problematic to many. 

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24 minutes ago, ForwardMotion said:

In my non-professional experience, most gluten-free individuals are gluten-free, dairy-free and soy-free - what I call the “trifecta”. Wish more food manufacturers and Gluten-free or celiac-friendly restaurants would pay attention to this. Corn is also problematic to many. 

Well, I've been dairy-free for six months now, and soy is not really a part of my diet, aside from occasionally using tamari (gluten-free) soy sauce on my rice.  But on the Fasano Diet, I was eliminating even the tamari as a matter of course.

Corn may be problem.  I don't eat or use it much either, but I did have recent problem with the DH that MAY have more-or-less coincided with consuming hominy.  But I won't know that for sure until I can start reintroducing foods down the road.

I seem to have a bit more of a flare-up today, and in the last three days I have eaten both rice and potatoes each day.  I do know that some people have complained about the nightshade family members (potatoes, peppers, eggplant, tomatoes), but just what exactly those foods did to them I am not clear.  Mimicking signs of gluten ingestion?

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Corn would not make DH flare unless it was either CC'd in processing or was contaminated through your prep and cooking process. For example grilling the corn on a grill that had gluten prepared on it previously or washing it in a colander that had pasta drained previously.  IMHO Squirmy is spot on. Give yourself some time to heal on the gluten free diet and avoid HIGH iodine sources like iodized salt, seaweed and seafood. The bit of natural iodine in veggies and fruits shouldn't be an issue. If your other celiac issues like D or C etc have resolved then you are healing. DH is a bear for many and you may flare for a while but there will be a lessening in time. Hang in there it will get better.

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1 hour ago, Alaskaguy said:

Well, I've been dairy-free for six months now, and soy is not really a part of my diet, aside from occasionally using tamari (gluten-free) soy sauce on my rice.  But on the Fasano Diet, I was eliminating even the tamari as a matter of course.

Corn may be problem.  I don't eat or use it much either, but I did have recent problem with the DH that MAY have more-or-less coincided with consuming hominy.  But I won't know that for sure until I can start reintroducing foods down the road.

I seem to have a bit more of a flare-up today, and in the last three days I have eaten both rice and potatoes each day.  I do know that some people have complained about the nightshade family members (potatoes, peppers, eggplant, tomatoes), but just what exactly those foods did to them I am not clear.  Mimicking signs of gluten ingestion?

Alaskaguy,

Here is the research you are looking for they are entitled "Maize prolamins resistant to peptic-tryptic digestion maintain immune-recognition by IgA from some celiac disease patients." and "Maize prolamins could induce a gluten-like cellular immune response in some celiac disease patients." respectively.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22298027

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24152750

It is like Oats ...Corn can bother a subset of celiac's. ...reintroducing  it after a month off all corn products could confirm it is bothering you. ... if you have trouble with Xanthan gum ...it is probably corn bothering you.  This research is only a little over 5 years old so it might be another 10 or 15 years (and more studies) before medical science accepts corn can trigger an auto-immune response in some celiac's.

Corn is about 10 years behind where Oats is in this recognition.

Trust your body ....it knows better than doctor's do!

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice.

Posterboy,

 

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2 hours ago, Alaskaguy said:

I do know that some people have complained about the nightshade family members (potatoes, peppers, eggplant, tomatoes), but just what exactly those foods did to them I am not clear.  Mimicking signs of gluten ingestion?

Alaskaguy, the thing with the nightshades is inflammation. I've never heard of nightshades making anyone's dh flare or anything else. Seems like ppl avoid nightshades to stop their body from hurting.

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1 hour ago, squirmingitch said:

Alaskaguy, the thing with the nightshades is inflammation. I've never heard of nightshades making anyone's dh flare or anything else. Seems like ppl avoid nightshades to stop their body from hurting.

Ah, thank you so much for clarifying that, Squirmingitch!  I had actually tried searching threads in this forum to figure out just what nightshade family veggies were doing to people with celiac disease, but the answer was not clear to me.  I'll rest a bit easier now when I eat my breakfast potatoes tomorrow morning.

You know, I kind of like potatoes for breakfast!  I had them, peeled and boiled, with some olive oil, salt (non-iodized), freshly ground black pepper (my one spice concession on the Fasano Diet), and fresh dill.  I topped it off with some cubed-up avocado.  It was a damn good breakfast, if I say so myself.

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2 hours ago, Posterboy said:

Alaskaguy,

Here is the research you are looking for they are entitled "Maize prolamins resistant to peptic-tryptic digestion maintain immune-recognition by IgA from some celiac disease patients." and "Maize prolamins could induce a gluten-like cellular immune response in some celiac disease patients." respectively.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22298027

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24152750

It is like Oats ...Corn can bother a subset of celiac's. ...reintroducing  it after a month off all corn products could confirm it is bothering you. ... if you have trouble with Xanthan gum ...it is probably corn bothering you.  This research is only a little over 5 years old so it might be another 10 or 15 years (and more studies) before medical science accepts corn can trigger an auto-immune response in some celiac's.

Corn is about 10 years behind where Oats is in this recognition.

Trust your body ....it knows better than doctor's do!

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice.

Posterboy,

 

Posterboy, thank you for passing along those links to that information about corn and celiac disease.  It makes total sense to me that corn could, in at least some rarer cases, aggravate the condition in the same way as oats, as corn (maize) is a grain, after all.  That is why I still am not sure about the teff that I had used a number of times, either --- not that I'm using any teff, or corn, or oats right now, as of a few days ago.

And I did not know about the link between Xanthan Gum and corn!  I will certainly keep that in mind.  There is something just kind of ..... creepy about xanthan gum, I could just NEVER stand the weird, slimy, snot-like texture that it gives to anything that it is put into.  I once bought a rather expensive bottle of what was sold as "vanilla bean paste", thinking it would be just ground-up vanilla beans with maybe a small amount of something liquid to make it pastelike, and instead it was what seemed like a modest amount of vanilla beans in an incredibly thick, goopy, almost gumlike mass of xanthan gum!  It totally revolted me --- it was like something that a dinosaur with a head cold would have blown out its nose after waking up in the morning.

Again, though, I really appreciate you bringing this information on corn to my attention.  There are some truly wonderful people in this forum, and I am tremendously thankful to have found it, and them.

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21 hours ago, Alaskaguy said:

Ah, thank you so much for clarifying that, Squirmingitch!  I had actually tried searching threads in this forum to figure out just what nightshade family veggies were doing to people with celiac disease, but the answer was not clear to me.  I'll rest a bit easier now when I eat my breakfast potatoes tomorrow morning.

You know, I kind of like potatoes for breakfast!  I had them, peeled and boiled, with some olive oil, salt (non-iodized), freshly ground black pepper (my one spice concession on the Fasano Diet), and fresh dill.  I topped it off with some cubed-up avocado.  It was a damn good breakfast, if I say so myself.

Potatoes are good for breakfast! Your concoction sounds pretty good. K, how about this? Peel & dice potatoes, fry them in just enough olive oil to keep them from sticking in a skillet until they begin getting crispy. Toss in diced sweet peppers or maybe chili peppers, onions to soften. I know you're not doing egg yolks b/c of iodine but you can do the whites. Pour egg white on top until the white is done. If you have a steak or some leftover steak, you can heat that on the side. YUM!

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16 hours ago, squirmingitch said:

Potatoes are good for breakfast! Your concoction sounds pretty good. K, how about this? Peel & dice potatoes, fry them in just enough olive oil to keep them from sticking in a skillet until they begin getting crispy. Toss in diced sweet peppers or maybe chili peppers, onions to soften. I know you're not doing egg yolks b/c of iodine but you can do the whites. Pour egg white on top until the white is done. If you have a steak or some leftover steak, you can heat that on the side. YUM!

Oh yes, that does sound good!  I've always been fine with potatoes, but just haven't eaten them all that frequently, and usually in a recipe that specifically needed or called for them.  But for the next few months, at least, I think I'll be using them much more.

Not that I want to try to subsist mostly on carbs here, but I am also going to be using more sweet pototoes, and also trying to incorporate both plantains (cooking bananas) and yuca (cassava root) into my diet as well.  Both of the latter are readily available at some ethnic food stores in Anchorage, as that city has large Hispanic, Samoan and Phillipino communities  (I know, who would have thought?).  Fresh Taro root is also available, but for some reason taro is MUCH more expensive than those others, like $5.00/lb.  Sorry, but I'm not paying meat prices for a root vegetable!

I've already noticed, on this whole-grain, fish, dairy and legume-free Fasano Diet, that I am going to need to watch and supplement both my calcium/magnesium/Vitamin D intakes, as well as fiber.  I know that the Fasano Diet does allow dried beans, but I am very wary of them right now, somewhat for their moderate iodine content, but mainly because of  the potential for cross-contamination with gluten grains and/or dust.  Maybe I'll reconsider that down the road, as they would be good for adding both non-animal protein (which my version of the Fasano Diet mostly now lacks), as well as for adding fiber to the diet, as Alaska in the winter is not exactly a mecca for fresh green vegetables, particularly leafy vegetables, which in the stores are both expensive and often rather old and sad.

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On 3/16/2019 at 12:43 PM, Alaskaguy said:

Hello All,

As you may have read in my other recent threads, as of a couple of days ago I have decided to try the Fasano Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet, for at least three or four months, to both try to resolve my recurring dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), and to help me determine which (if any) conventionally-considered gluten-free foods might have been causing me these ongoing problems (suspects are purity protocol oats, teff, corn, eggs, and/or buckwheat).

Given that I am doing this for DH, I apparently also have to avoid any high-iodine foods, so I will be eliminating iodized salt, all dairy products (both the iodized salt and the dairy products I actually already gave up seven months ago), all seafoods, and most eggs (I might use one or two in a meatloaf, that'd be about it).

The guidelines of the diet state that any fresh and whole fruit and vegetable, and all fresh and unprocessed meats, should be OK. 

My question for anyone is this: are there any OTHER potential pitfalls or problem foods that I should avoid on this Fasano Diet, keeping DH in mind?

For example, the guidelines seem to allow potatoes and tomatoes, although I have read that some people have problems with nightshade family vegetables --- potatoes, peppers, tomatoes, eggplant.  Elsewhere, I have read indications that foods high in oxalates might be a problem for others --- chocolate (I was going to avoid anyway), spinach, rhubarb, etc.  And in yet another reference, I have read that for some people, vegetables from the carrot/parsley family ---- carrots, celery, parsnips --- can be problematic.

Obviously, I cannot avoid ALL of these potentially problematic foods, or I'd be left with just water!  So I'm just wondering if anyone has any good advice for what I should watch for on this diet, again taking into account that I am doing it to resolve DH and not any gastrointestinal symptoms (which all cleared up long ago for me).  Thanks as always.

 

On 3/20/2019 at 12:13 PM, Alaskaguy said:

Oh yes, that does sound good!  I've always been fine with potatoes, but just haven't eaten them all that frequently, and usually in a recipe that specifically needed or called for them.  But for the next few months, at least, I think I'll be using them much more.

Not that I want to try to subsist mostly on carbs here, but I am also going to be using more sweet pototoes, and also trying to incorporate both plantains (cooking bananas) and yuca (cassava root) into my diet as well.  Both of the latter are readily available at some ethnic food stores in Anchorage, as that city has large Hispanic, Samoan and Phillipino communities  (I know, who would have thought?).  Fresh Taro root is also available, but for some reason taro is MUCH more expensive than those others, like $5.00/lb.  Sorry, but I'm not paying meat prices for a root vegetable!

I've already noticed, on this whole-grain, fish, dairy and legume-free Fasano Diet, that I am going to need to watch and supplement both my calcium/magnesium/Vitamin D intakes, as well as fiber.  I know that the Fasano Diet does allow dried beans, but I am very wary of them right now, somewhat for their moderate iodine content, but mainly because of  the potential for cross-contamination with gluten grains and/or dust.  Maybe I'll reconsider that down the road, as they would be good for adding both non-animal protein (which my version of the Fasano Diet mostly now lacks), as well as for adding fiber to the diet, as Alaska in the winter is not exactly a mecca for fresh green vegetables, particularly leafy vegetables, which in the stores are both expensive and often rather old and sad.

Alaskaguy, 

Sorry to interrupt, but I wanted to put in my two cents.

I prefer the Autoimmune Protocol diet because it helps heal the gut so quickly.  It's a bit more strict than the Fasano diet but the results are striking.

  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5647120/#!po=43.7500

People with Celiac and DH have a problem with leaky guts.  The AIP diet helps heal this problem.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3934051

Nightshade vegetables are not allowed on the AIP diet because they contain glycoalkyloids that contribute to permeable guts.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12479649

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3386601/

Mast Cell Activation Syndrome is also involved in celiac disease and DH.  Mast Cells are triggered into releasing histamine when stuff gets through that leaky gut. That histamine is what aggravates DH.

https://www.celiac.com/blogs/entry/1931-mast-cell-activation-syndrome-madness/

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/mi/2014/936545/

A Low Histamine Diet is also helpful because it helps the mast cells not to trigger.

https://www.histamineintolerance.org.uk/about/the-food-diary/the-food-list/

So, the Autoimmune Protocol diet crossed with the Low Histamine Diet may sound really strict, but you can see results within weeks and you won't need to stay on it forever.  Once your symptoms disappear, you can start adding more options into your diet.  

Make sure your vitamin levels are not deficient. (Get them checked before starting supplementation to get correct levels.)  People with celiac disease and DH are often low in Vitamin D and B12.  I'm a big fan of having vitamin D level above the usually accepted level of 30 ng/ml.  70ng/ml or above is better and allows vitamin D to work as it should.  And nicotinamide (vitamin B3) helps mast cells not to release histamine.  The nine B vitamins all work together, so discuss with your doctor the benefits of taking a good B Complex supplement.

Hope this helps! 

P.S. Himalayan salt may have less iodine than sea salt.  Sea salt may contain plastic waste particles because of pollution in our oceans. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Alaskaguy,

Like Knitty Kitty I am one of the researchers on this forum.  she has provide you good links.

So I wanted to chime in and share some research I found recently that might help you....entitled "Two Cases of Dermatitis Herpetiformis Successfully Treated with Tetracycline and Niacinamide."

This is recent research too which can be hard to come by to find something directly that might help you.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30390734

Also see this thread about how this fact has been long forgotten and while I study/research a lot for my own health problems I was intrigued and surprised to find the issue of Niacin to treat DH had been studied before but now mostly forgotten.

https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/123806-old-research-on-dh-is-it-time-for-it-be-rediscovered/

New(er) research(ers) are now rediscovering this fact including as recently as 2018 as shown above.

I like to say it takes a generation to pass this knowledge on to the next.  It is amazing how many times something has been studied and no one knows anything about it. ...I was actually very surprised this research is being applied today....the last research I found before this current 2018 research was circa 2000 yet here 18+ years later (which is a typical time to reach clinical practice) .. new researchers are now discovering this old fact that Niacinamide can be used to treat DH.  And the old research on this topic is 50+ years old and still doctors/researchers are not aware of it. ...I actually came across it by accident studying for some one else and my own curiosity when DH became associated with celiac disease. ..to my surprise DH as a distinct disease predates it association with Celiac disease by 20+ years. ..a fact long forgotten.

Again, I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice.

Glad to hear you are already showing improvement on the Fasano diet.

I was going to post something else but this response thread is getting too long and I don't have more time right now so I wanted to post something kinda quick tonight.

2 Tim 2:7 “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included.

Posterboy by the grace of God,

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Knitty Kitty,

Here is the link to the Old research.

I think you will find it interesting. ..I know you used Niacin to treat your itching with your DH.

https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/82674034.pdf

see Case IV but read them all when you get the chance. they review 12 case studies.

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advise.

Posterboy,

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Thanks Posterboy, that was interesting information.  I believe that I had read something elsewhere about tetracycline, at least, being used instead of, or along with, Dapsone for severe or refractory cases of DH.

Unfortunately, even if I had medical insurance (which I do not), and had a regular doctor who was even willing to recognize and accept my condition for what it is, I don't know what kind of luck I would have in persuading that hypothetical doctor to give me a particular and non-standard treatment for the DH. 

Thankfully, due to the (conventional) gluten-free diet I've been on for the last almost 14 months, I have had significant improvement with the DH that to that point had only been getting worse with each passing year .  And now being on the Fasano Elimination  Diet for the next few months, I remain quite hopeful that I will see a complete or near-complete remission of my symptoms by the end of this year, if not sooner. 

I am just enormously thankful that I was finally able to figure out, on my own (and after a great deal of research), just what my slowly-worsening condition actually is.  I have very little expectation that had I gone the traditional, medical-industry route, and tried to get a diagnosis and treatment from doctors, I would now just be thousands of dollars lighter, vastly frustrated and depressed, and much itchier and rashier than ever, after having been told that I have scabies, or bedbug bites, or "atopic dermatitis", or any number of other incorrect and snap diagnoses from medical practitioners who really don't give a damn or can't be bothered to consider every angle or every possibility.  I've already been down that road, twice, in my much-younger days, and to say that I little respect for most doctors is a significant understatement.

My one big fear now is that, in the future, should I ever have to be admitted to a hospital, or become unable to cook and care for myself, I will be utterly unable to convince the functionaries and staff who will be responsible for providing my food that I DO suffer from the condition which I do (Celiac disease with dermatitis herpetiformis), and will be refused the necessary strictly gluten-free diet that my health and sanity demands.  I'm not sure what I'd do in such a case.

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No worries about the hospital.  My hubby is not officially diagnosed with celiac disease.  He went gluten-free per the advice of two medical doctors some 20 years ago.  He recently had surgery and the hospital managed to keep him gluten free, but I had to advocate hard (drug verification was awkward and difficult as I did much of the legwork).  Now prisons?  All bets are off!  Even with a diagnosis, I am not sure they could keep you safe.  

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1 hour ago, cyclinglady said:

No worries about the hospital.  My hubby is not officially diagnosed with celiac disease.  He went gluten-free per the advice of two medical doctors some 20 years ago.  He recently had surgery and the hospital managed to keep him gluten free, but I had to advocate hard (drug verification was awkward and difficult as I did much of the legwork).  Now prisons?  All bets are off!  Even with a diagnosis, I am not sure they could keep you safe.  

Interesting about your husband's experience in the hospital, CyclingLady.  The one thing that I REALLY do not understand, from reading so many posts of many other people both here and elsewhere on the internet, is this apparent almost criminal indifference, kneejerk denial and/or outright hostility towards the very POSSIBILITY of a patient having Celiac Disease among so many in the medical industry.  I have not experienced it myself, as explained above, but it seems that having to fight with multiple doctors over multiple years just to get a diagnosis is the norm for people with Celiac Disease in the USA.  Why is this the case?

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I think it is because celiac disease was not “discovered” until after WWI when in Europe the fields were destroyed and there were wheat shortages.  Little malnourished kids became well for the first time.  Then the doctor began experimenting on his patients (good luck with that today) feeding those sick children a banana diet and they flourished.    Doctors still think that celiac disease is found just in malnourished children who have extended bellies.  Even when Dr. Fasano came to the US over 20 years ago, it was thought that celiac disease was rare, in children only, and was found mostly in Europe.  Indentifying the genes changed everything.  Unfortunately, awareness has been slow.  When my hubby went gluten free, no mention of celiac disease was made despite the autoimmune that ran in his family.  I personally think my GI that caught my diagnosis had just attended a celiac disease seminar.  I never asked because I never went back as we changed insurance.  

My new GI knows about celiac disease, but my new (just this week), PCP knows little about it.  Rumor has it that medical students get an hour lecture (if that).  

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On 3/18/2019 at 8:44 PM, squirmingitch said:

Alaskaguy, the thing with the nightshades is inflammation. I've never heard of nightshades making anyone's dh flare or anything else. Seems like ppl avoid nightshades to stop their body from hurting.

Just wanted to chime in. During my 2 plus years of healing I had joint pain and muscle pain with some of the nightshade mainly peppers and tomato. I stopped them. I can now eat them again. My theory is when my gut gets cc my holey gut dumps some of my food in my blood stream and my already ticked off immune system let's me know what is allowed. Apparently for a time nightshades  of potato, tomatos, and peppers were an issue. I was able to gradually introduce potatoes first and then tomatos, then peppers. It didn't manifest in me as a DH skin or rash issue. I also had an early time I stopped rice as I got itching, but not DH. My body was quite twitchy and sensitive 13 intolerance s then 8 etc over time. My chiropractor (also a celiac also told me to avoid soy at that early time)

As many know now-I am gluten, corn, and milk free. I too am sensitive to xanthum gum. Edit i have never liked oats - as a kid I rarely ate them and I don't eat them now. gluten-free oats are in the house as My daughter likes them.

Although my medical records officially state NCGS, my spouse and I have found I am likely a DH celiac upon cc it's very apparent now. Sadly 😠 Also my former Puppp rash diagnosis (visual diagnosis only) 14 years ago and the 2016 U of I celiac info about the DH /Puppp connection puts a bow on the issue on connect the dots for me. As I say on here all you DH folks have Puppp or My Puppp is DH. Lol 👍

My spouse and I decided to accept I'm a DH celiac as this post challenge life and the occasional dreaded cc has revealed/spoken. We are in no hurry to attempt my undergoing another (incomplete challenge) to prove it. I can't finish 2 weeks now can I give them 12. The cost was too high physically, emotionally, financially, the first time and it's possible my endoscope won't be gold standard ever. My cousin a good standard celiac. So NCGS stays in the medical record, but I very much live as a DH celiac now.

I recently stopped eating in the shared work lunchroom (despite my best efforts) as I was cc 3 times over 5 months. It was the only time I ate away from my gluten-free home.  I now eat in my car at work and no longer use the employee restrooms within the lunchroom area . I only use restroom outside of the lunchroom area.

Hoping this works as I re-entered the work force after having left employment during  my 2 plus years healing. 

Good luck on Fasano I hope with the help from those on here you get well soon.

Good luck.

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