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Amooliakin

Confused

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I read two things that seem to contradict each other. I'm wondering if they are both true but for different people.

One said that it is common to go gluten-free for a few years as a kid, then let gluten back in the diet with no symptoms. The book was explaining that no symptoms does NOT mean no Celiac disease. But I had not heard before of symptoms disappearing with age.

On the other hand, I hear a LOT from people who had less symptoms BEFORE going gluten-free and who find that after they have gotten all gluten out of their bodies they have a much STRONGER reaction to even tiny amounts.

So which is true?

Or can it be both?


Mother of 2 kids (one with Celiac) and 23 pet mice :)

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I believe it is both.

It makes sense because they describe celiac as a medical chameleon. Some people are 100% asymptomatic, others are debilitated and have every symptom, and most fall somewhere in between.

So yes, it is possible to have reactions sometimes, and others not. But, like you said, the lack of symptoms does not mean celiac is not there (proof: Asymptomatic celiacs with completely blutned villi)

And yes, some people who get gluten out get increasingly sensitive (I am a lucky one of those people).

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Both are true.

In the old days, they thought children outgrew Celiac because the symptoms lesson.

Since going gluten free my symptoms of accidental glutening have been worse in my opinion. (To explain all of that would be TMI.)

L.


Michigan

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isn't it interesting what docs "used" to know...

Are you suggesting that leeches AREN'T gluten-free??? :lol:

I'm going to have to rethink my HMO...

B)

But seriously folks...

I think I read the same book. They said that during adolescence that the symptoms can lessen. I think at this point they're not sure if it's a true remission, where no celiac or intolerance is present and no damage is being done at all, or if it's still damaging you, but just not showing outward symptoms.

Nancy


The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person who is doing it.

~Chinese Proverb

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I've never been somone to get sick on just a piece bread, however even I have always had my limits.

When I was younger my limit was a lot less than what was since I was prolly about 14, howver even I have been able to eat more gluten in my teens, I most def still have limits.

From what I have read tho, this doesn't mean its not hurting you - I think it is much like a smoker, Just because it doesnt effect you immediately doesn't mean that it is not doing any damage.

I have heard of people who are allergic to gluten but after following a gluten free diet for a year or so can eat it again and they don't have problems.

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Both are true.

In the old days, they thought children outgrew Celiac because the symptoms lesson.

Since going gluten free my symptoms of accidental glutening have been worse in my opinion. (To explain all of that would be TMI.)

L.

I had a clinical intstructor in nursing school try to tell me that this was the case with her. How do you correct your professor and the keeper of your clinical grade?! I tried to test the waters and she wouldn't hear of it...there was no way she could be wrong and her student was right. I let it go quickly, lol. Although that does explain a lot of her mental instabilities! :P


Amy

Diagnosed by biopsy with DH August 2005

Diagnosed with hypo-thyroidism December 2005

Diagnosed by biopsy with Celiac July 2006

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Danna Korn has mentioned "the honeymoon phase" in her book Kid's with celiac disease. There are other documented sources out there.

Wait until your grade is in, set in stone, and then drop off an information packet to this "teacher". ;)

L.


Michigan

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I know I am going off the topic now... but you bring up an interesting phenomenon. Now that I know about celiac, and we are taking care of our daughter in the right way, I find there are SO MANY adults who I meet who think they outrgrew celiac years ago, or their adult kids did, etc. They do not want to hear differntly - and I don't know them well enough to tell them the truth. I wish there was one simple booklet that I could hand out instead of trying to explain it or refer them to books they don't want to read or web sites they don't think they need....


Mother of 2 kids (one with Celiac) and 23 pet mice :)

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Doesn't some of the confusion come from the fact that you can outgrow an allergy and a wheat allergy could have very similar outward symptoms to celiac?

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Doesn't some of the confusion come from the fact that you can outgrow an allergy and a wheat allergy could have very similar outward symptoms to celiac?

Yes, most likely. Some many out grow an allergy, but an intolerance, never. <_<


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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I was a celiac baby and thought I outgrew it until this year. I don't understand why symptoms are hidden. I have heard that smoking hides the symptoms.


Lee

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